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Growing Squash with Natural Plant Nursery

 
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I wanted to make this thread to help me keep track of and document my squash.

Hopefully it can be helpful to others also!
 
Steve Thorn
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Big little baby squash plant!

These squash were planted by simply scattering the seed on the soil and doing a light mixing of the seeds into a thin mulch layer on top.

They won't be watered at all this year except by the rain.

I time the planting of the seeds right before a rain, so that they get watered in naturally soon after being planted.
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Big little baby squash plant! :)
 
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Looks like a baby Seminole type with the white veins.
 
Steve Thorn
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Dan Allen wrote:Looks like a baby Seminole type with the white veins.



Yeah, I think it's some type of c. Moschata, but not sure what type.
 
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The first time I ever grew squash it was by accident.

I had just made my first hugelbeet, and my second-last layer (right under the woodchip mulch) was "finished" compost.

So one day I went out to check on the progress of the cucumbers I planted along the fence. I had been watching them, picking and pickling them as they got to finger-size. I noticed a cucumber vine without any cucumbers on it, with leaves closer to the size of healthy rhubarb than plantain, and whose flowers weren't tiny, but enormous.

It turns out it was a volunteer Butternut squash from the compost. The first, and not the last, that I found off that single plant, held cupped in one hand, comfortably reached halfway up my bicep. I think I got almost thirty more or less the same size off that single squash plant.

-CK
 
Steve Thorn
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That's awesome Chris!

It seems like a lot of plant volunteers can be vigorous growers and really productive a lot of the time!
 
Steve Thorn
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I planted this group of squash really thickly with some cucumbers and some lettuce if I remember right.

I haven't planted squash in a while so I planted a lot together here. Usually I like to spread out the plants more, but if it's something new or haven't planted in a while, I try to grow a group together so I can monitor it easier.

Do you grow a new variety or plant differently or in another spot than ones you are more familiar with?
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Little squash coming up with a few other plants
 
Steve Thorn
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The squash plants are really growing fast this year, and the flower buds are starting to form near the base of the plant.

We've had two weeks in the 90s with only one super quick rain shower, and these squash are chugging right along!

They have a very small amount of mulch, but they are growing extremely close together which provides a little shade which I think helps a lot!
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The squash are growing quickly! :)
 
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Thanks so much for posting these, Steve. It's astounding to see the progress from the may shot of the fledgling plants making first true leaves. Your growth rate is incredible. A testament to your soil and how happy they are shading/helping each other. Looking forward to trying this intensive method!
 
Steve Thorn
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Cj Jones wrote:Thanks so much for posting these, Steve. It's astounding to see the progress from the may shot of the fledgling plants making first true leaves. Your growth rate is incredible. A testament to your soil and how happy they are shading/helping each other. Looking forward to trying this intensive method!



Thanks Cj, it's worked really well for me so far. No watering, weeding, or major pest or disease problems so far, just planting, observing, and harvesting. It makes gardening so much more enjoyable to me!

Wish you the best!
 
Steve Thorn
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Lots of baby summer squash showing up!
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Baby squash! :)
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Close up
 
Steve Thorn
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This is one productive summer squash plant!
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Lots of flowers too!
 
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