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permies ideas on seed catalogs

 
pollinator
Posts: 4437
Location: North Central Michigan
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Seed catalogs have just begun to arrive here in Michgan USA and I'm wondering if people would be willing to share their favorites on this thread. I am trying to find more and more perennial edibles than what I have..and I got a seed catalog yesterday from Pinetree Garden Seeds and was very pleased with the selections of open pollinated seeds that they had available at quite fair prices. There were a few of the items I have been seeking seeds for in there, but most of the ones mentioned on this site were not listed. A lot of the individual threads have links to where to find the odd things, but if you have the time please list the ones you particularly LOVE here.

Also if you find good forms of and resources for some of the more difficult to find items like skirret, groundnut, cammass, good king henery, perennial greens like kales and collards, etc. Thanks
 
pollinator
Posts: 1528
Location: zone 7
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id like to know a north American source of chinese artichokes if anyone knows of one.

for seed companies i like J.L. Hudson seeds for seeds that permies love.
 
steward
Posts: 7926
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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Absolutely. J. L. Hudsons belongs on every permaculturist's book shelf. Many hard to find seeds are included. Pricing is more than reasonable.

http://jlhudsonseeds.net/

Another good source of hard to find seeds is

http://www.treeshrubseeds.com/default.htm

Their pricing actually often beats JL Hudson, especially if you want bulk.

 
John Polk
steward
Posts: 7926
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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Chinese artichokes are readily available in Europe, but quite hard to find here in the US.

You might try http://companionplants.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=373

They are not cheap, but perhaps once you have them established, you can propagate as many as you need.

EDITED to delete a dead link. JP
 
master pollinator
Posts: 11276
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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Brush up on your Latin! http://jlhudsonseeds.net/

Traditional varieties of vegetables from the Southwest US: http://www.nativeseeds.org/

Inexpensive heirloom and open-pollinated interesting vegetables, herbs, flowers: https://www.superseeds.com/

Edible prairie plants: http://www.prairiemoon.com/seeds/

 
John Polk
steward
Posts: 7926
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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Although JLHudson lists varieties by their latin name, if you search the online catalog by common name, it will take you to the page where it is listed. You may have to scan the page to find where the common name appears.
 
Posts: 95
Location: Central Texas, it is dry here.
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Here are my all time favorites:

Bountiful Gardens: http://www.bountifulgardens.org/

Seed Savers Exchange: http://www.seedsavers.org/

Georgia Vines: http://georgiavines.com/

For those in the Northern Climates, I will add my Grandmothers two favorites.

Jung Seed: http://www.jungseed.com/

R.H. Shumway: http://www.rhshumway.com/
 
gardener
Posts: 213
Location: Clarkston, MI
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Here's a link to a nursery that is permaculturally minded in S.W. MI. They sell mostly native MI plants and true breeding heirloom varieties. There is also a very cool article about them from mother earth news. I am planning on getting a large bulk of my trees from them in the spring.

Website

http://oikostreecrops.com

Article

http://www.motherearthnews.com/sustainable-farming/permaculture-farm-oikos-tree-crops-zw0z11zsto.aspx
 
Posts: 228
Location: San Diego, CA USA
medical herbs writing
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For Herb Seeds in USA: http://horizonherbs.com
 
Posts: 183
Location: Vashon WA, near Seattle and Tacoma
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@John Polk: Omigod, that treeshrubseeds.com site is awesome! Bookmarked, you bet! Thanks.
 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
Posts: 4437
Location: North Central Michigan
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wow, so exciting, I just clicked on and bookmarked or ordered catalogs of all of the links..one was actually to the pinetree garden catalog that I mentioned in the first thread.

I was so thrilled to find the oikos site, and hope to be able to visit there next spring..not sure what town it is in in Michigan but I'll find out somehow...thanks..
 
Tyler Ludens
master pollinator
Posts: 11276
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
711
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I have to say something nice about Oikos - they were the only nursery (in the world, apparently) who had plants of a particular kind I wanted, but when I placed my order, their website got hacked. The owner called me and explained the situation and even offered to send me the plants for free to make up for the trouble I would have to go through to cancel my credit card and get another (I did not take him up on the offer because the hacking was not his fault). I got the plants eventually - but I don't know if they will grow for me (they seem dormant).

I also like http://www.onegreenworld.com/
 
Ivan Weiss
Posts: 183
Location: Vashon WA, near Seattle and Tacoma
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@ astroherbalist mccoy: I second the endorsement for Horizon Herbs, but couldn't do without Richters.
 
gardener
Posts: 1383
Location: Cascades of Oregon
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Okios had the largest selection of Jerusalem artichokes.
One Green World is pretty close to me and I have used them quite often.
Territorial Seeds has been great
Bakers Creek Heirloom Seeds, is also great, beautiful catalog.
I got some great stuff from the USDA for free, Black currant and lingonberries.
 
Posts: 166
Location: Yucatan Puebla Ontario BC
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This is my seed company. there is also a free booklet about economics on the home page http://www.wisdomfarms.org
 
Tyler Ludens
master pollinator
Posts: 11276
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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Here's a good source for edible bulbs such as camassia and Tiger Lily: http://www.vanengelen.com/catview.cgi?_fn=Bulbs
 
Posts: 17
Location: Northern Mich. Zone 5
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Brenda Groth wrote:wow, so exciting, I just clicked on and bookmarked or ordered catalogs of all of the links..one was actually to the pinetree garden catalog that I mentioned in the first thread.

I was so thrilled to find the oikos site, and hope to be able to visit there next spring..not sure what town it is in in Michigan but I'll find out somehow...thanks..



Brenda, let us know if you arrange a visit. I tried to visit this fall and was turned down. I had hopes of looking at all the interesting plants they sell.
 
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Loving these links everybody, thank you!

We get most of our veggie seeds from High Mowing Seeds: http://www.highmowingseeds.com/
 
Posts: 25
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Here is a list of resources:

http://www.off-grid.info/food-independence/heirloom-seed-suppliers.html

Some other resources:

Rio Guaycuyacu http://www.guaycuyacu.net/

Kitazawa Seed Company http://www.kitazawaseed.com

Adopt-A-Mirliton Project http://mirlitons.org/

Evergreen Seeds Company http://www.evergreenseeds.com

Territorial Seed Company http://www.territorialseed.com/

Silverhill Seeds http://www.silverhillseeds.co.za

Helton Josue http://www.colecionandofrutas.org/

High Mowing Seeds http://www.highmowingseeds.com/

Sand Hill Preservation http://www.sandhillpreservation.com

Sacred Succulents http://sacredsucculents.com

Desert Survivors http://www.desertsurvivors.org

Some of these resources have seeds or plants that are wild food species in their native regions. Some are from difficlt climate e.g. the Brazilian Cerrado, the South African veld etc.... lot of things that should be tried in many places. Also some of these species are rare, local endemics, or under pressure in the wild, so it is good to move them around.

Seed Savers Exchange http://www.seedsavers.org

A special word about Seed Savers -- I was very unhappy to learn from an online posting by Kent Whealy that the organization has evidently been hijacked and the collection given over to multinational GMO breeders. Still, as of the 2014 Catalog they are a valuable source for gardeners and organic growers, but it not known how long things will go on the way they have been.


 
Posts: 68
Location: West Michigan Zone 5
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I get a lot of my seeds from Annie' s Heirlooms , they are on Beaver Island here in Michigan and pretty reasonable http://www.anniesheirloomseeds.com/
 
Posts: 1444
Location: Fennville MI
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With regard to Seed Savers - looking at discussion on their board, this appears to be roughly five year old "news" and not at all clear. People with excellent credentials are still supporting Seed Savers Exchange. Looking over the make up of their Board of Directors I see nothing to suggest a hijacking.

I did not see anything that gave me cause for concern.
 
Michael Martin
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Here is the link to the speech Kent gave at an address to The Land Institute:

http://farmwars.info/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/Land-Inst.-Complete-speech.pdf

 
Peter Ellis
Posts: 1444
Location: Fennville MI
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Michael Martin wrote:Here is the link to the speech Kent gave at an address to The Land Institute:

http://farmwars.info/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/Land-Inst.-Complete-speech.pdf



And the forum discussion over there at Seed Savers presents more than Kent's view.
 
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