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A well-designed small house makes life much simpler!

 
pollinator
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Location: Finland, Scandinavia
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Denise, yes, it id birch. Ground freezes 1,5 feet deep here. Normally we have a couple of feet of snow, which isolates the ground so it does not freeze more than rhat.

For 8 months a year, outside temps are low enough to have the foyer as a refridgerator. I am building a root cellar this summer.
 
Kaarina Kreus
pollinator
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Planting has been pretty laborious, since first I have to build the beds before being able to sprinkle a single seed. I am almost finished with the root garden.
20230512_172708.jpg
A raised bed garden under construction
 
pollinator
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The photos show a lot of very well-thought-out uses of space. Use and efficiency is the key, rather than absolute size.

I raised 3 kids in a 16 x 20 ft log cabin. We slept up in the attic, under the peak of the roof, reached by a ladder and a trap door. We had no plumbing or electricity. We were also 15 miles from the nearest road and could only get to our home by boat or float plane.  It was wonderful and I loved it, particularly the part about having no electric lights. Song and story flourish when you can't keep your daytime activities going until bedtime.

As an older person, who lives in a very tiny space, I would caution that extremely small size can be very limiting and counterproductive for a homesteader. There was a reason that traditional farmhouses had some size to them--not McMansion size, but enough space to get work done and keep essential tools and stored food under cover. In our current space, we mostly just read when we aren't outside, because there is no space for projects. Skills and projects require tools, and a place to use and store them. Food preservation and storage take equipment and space. Even if you sun-dry your produce rather than, say, canning it, you'll need racks, and rodent-proof storage and lots of it. I'm not saying you need the kind of big house that has become the norm--you don't., But I do know from experience that a homesteader needs more space than an urban tiny-home dweller does.

You also need to plan for more space as you age, because of mobility issues and the equipment needs that age might bring. At 45, I slept on the floor and folded my bed up in the morning. 72, I prefer a bed, and not to climb a ladder to it. I don't want to have to move if I need a walker or a wheelchair, so there need to be clear spaces.

So yes, keep it small and simple. But plan for all the things you will need to do, want to do, and may have to do.
 
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Kaarina Kreus wrote:As I have no electricity, wood storage is important.

Last spring, I got a huge amount of firewood when an area of the farm was cleared. However, the firewood was dumped in a pile and I had nowhere to store it.

We just finished the wood hut yeasterday. I will be carrying wood to the hut for the next two weeks!



That is the most beautiful AND clever wood shed I've ever seen.  I'd love to know how the notches are made to nest each "log" together.
 
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Location: Cache Valley, Northern Utah (zone 6a, 4,900 elevation)
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There are some threads on permies that I find myself revisiting again and again.
This is one of them. I never tire of seeing Kaarina's lovely and well organized tiny house.
Anyone else here for a 2nd, 3rd, 4th or 11th look?
 
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Location: Bulgaria
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Perfect. I just stumbled upon this thread and it's the kind of thing I'm building, semi underground.
I've just posted it up on here.
Thanks for sharing
 
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Location: Tampa, Florida
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Jane Mulberry wrote:It's amazing how fast expectations of what is enough have changed!

 
Who among you feels worthy enough to be my best friend? Test 1 is to read this tiny ad:
Boost Egg Nutrition With This Organic Algae Poultry Supplement
https://permies.com/t/153700/Organic-Astaxanthin-Algae-Poultry-Supplement
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