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Is there a way to create negative air pressure on a standard toilet?

 
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In Orin's Boot Camp Thread he make this post about one issue with a standard porcelain toilet.    

Orin Raichart wrote:As a reminder, Paul isn't content with the current potty solution. He also reminded me we do have squeeze bottle bidets available after daily freezing stops.

We'll look into experiments later when the weather is warmer  -but for now, this is how the toilets are used.

Why???

Because, infact, your flush toilet is really nasty....you just think it's normal (just like the parts of Mexico which have bad plumbing and cannot throw the toilet paper in the toilet ).

How is your flush toilet nasty you ask???

If you only knew!!!

....well, okay, I'll tell you, just don't be mad cause every time you use that nasty thing, you'll remember this and get a little queasy.

Have you ever noticed when you take a dump in your toilet how bad that smells???     aaaaahhhh, that's the part that's nasty.

Because the reason you're smelling anything is because little particles of that item is inside your nose, brought there by the air you breathe.

That means when someone makes a stinky doo doo in your porcelain throne, you smell it cause you have their shit up your nose!  Yep. Like that.     feeling superior now???

okay then, do you smell pee when you pee in your nice porcelain throne???   Yep. Same thing. Pee in your nose.

Now you know you want your toilet to be negative pressure so the air from your butt (and everyone who uses your toilet) never gets near your nose!

Aaahhhh, but guess what? you aint' gonna get a nice porcelain throne with negative pressure!  

So whatcha gonna do with all that poo, all that doo in your nose???

Build a good willow bank like ours, silly!

Anyways, tomorrow I'll talk about food at Wheaton Labs.



This brings up an idea I had (or stole).  Would there be a way to easily modify a standard toilet to put negative pressure on the area of the bowl where the little holes are?  And then put a tiny fan on it that runs at the same time as the bath vent fan or the lights to exhaust the stink?  I'm kind of wondering if those holes are connected (and open to) the tank even when there's water in the tank and the flush flapper is seated.

Just throwing the idea out there for others to run with...
 
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I think those are open to the tank through the overflow tube beside the flap. A foam seal around the lid and you should be able to pull air out but you need a way to vent air in during the flush or the flush may stall...
 
Mike Haasl
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Ahh, that's right, I forgot about the overflow tube.  So all you'd need to do is make a new top or poke a hole near the rim of the tank for a vacuum line.  

I'm assuming the vent air for the flush comes in below the loose fitting lid on the tank.  So if the vacuum line was sucking air from the tank, I wonder if it would all come from that same gap or if it would actually come from the overflow and suck away the poop smell...
 
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Only thing i can think of is to add an extension, like those made to turn a low boy commode into a tall boy. It goes on the commode opening, lifting it a few inches. The seat now mounts to it.

A ducted fan could be installed on this adapter piece.
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I wonder what the dilution of fecal matter is in a public swiming pool as compared to the gaseous particulate matter from a bathroom. That's a lot of bungholios in that there pool. This comes from a test done on well water near septic tanks and a public pool. Nitrates present but no fecal matter detected in the well but fecal matter did appear in pool water.
 
Mike Haasl
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Good point.  If I smell baked bread, am I getting bread chunks in my nose or is it something different that travels through the air into my face holes?
 
Robert Ray
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Why are bathroom vents in the ceiling?  If they were lower in the wall would that reduce the olifactory assault? Sorry the attachment just had to be included.
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Mike Haasl
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I'm thinking they're in the ceiling for a couple reasons.  Ease of install being one.  Proximity to hot shower humidity being an even better one.  Maybe a second one by the pooper could be an option as well.
 
R Scott
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Mike Haasl wrote:I'm thinking they're in the ceiling for a couple reasons.  Ease of install being one.  Proximity to hot shower humidity being an even better one.  Maybe a second one by the pooper could be an option as well.



The trend in upper end homes is to have a throne room with a door and exhaust fan on a timer so it runs for a couple air changes after you leave. One we built included soundproofing measures...
 
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Interesting thought.  My memory may be faulty, but I seem to remember the vent fans of the late 50s being in the wall .....when there were any fans at all.
 
Robert Ray
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I just assumed that we were just talking about a pooper room and no need to vent humidity. Positive pressure into the room and  lower vents to outside of room?
 
R Scott
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John F Dean wrote:Interesting thought.  My memory may be faulty, but I seem to remember the vent fans of the late 50s being in the wall .....when there were any fans at all.



Yup, easier to install.  If they were in the top third of the wall, they were efficient enough for venting humidity.  Especially when you weren't worried about sticking out all the AC
 
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What I did was place a vacuum cleaner in my storage room on the other side of the wall behind my toilet  and I ran the vacuum hose plus some extensions through the wall into a special flattened  vacuum hose attachmment
that fits under the back of my toilet seat.   Whenever you sit down on the toilet you pull the boat horn switch sticking out of the bath cabinet behind the toilet.   This activates said vacuum cleaner
in next room  and creates a nice suction that you can barely hear due to vacuum on the other side of the wall.     WHEN DONE..... push on boat horn switch.

THERE   Negative pressure solved !    Zero offensive smells.
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