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DaVinci Resolve - for video editing?

 
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Someone suggested I try DaVinci Resolve for video editing because it's free.

I have no idea what it is.  So far I've been using Movie Maker and struggling.  At first, I thought it was the user failing, but after doing some more reading and research, it might be the tool.  

Anyone here use DaVinci?  Tips, tricks, help?  Where does a n00b like me get started?
 
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Bump...  I hope someone with actual experience will reply here...

In the mean time, I always expect beginner intros to products live on youtube.   So I did a quick search.   I found this video, which shows a quick runthru of using DaVinci Resolve.  



It looks very good, but has a disclaimer at the end that it needs a very beefy, late-model PC to run.   This opinion seems to be borne out by further search hits on other sites, though I cannot vouch for these.

The same youtuber is recommending (he's an affiliate for) Filmora which specifically advertises itself as running on older, lower-end hardware.  It looks like it costs 60 USD and has a free trial version (I didn't try it.)
Same youtuber has a beginner tutorial for Filmora:


Hope this helps.... just some searches...
 
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I found another free video editor called Shotcut.  (Be a little careful what you are clicking on there:  google is advertising their competitors on the Shotcut site!)

This one actually says it is open source, and is avail for Win, Mac, and Linux!.  Here's a review channel giving a demo/tutorial of it:



This is just searching at this point.   However, this one looks compelling enough that I might try it.
 
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I did use DaVinci Resolve a while back. It is a super professional software. Their idea is, that they give the software away for free and make money selling the hardware. I like it, and I like that they're alternative to the giants who dominate the multimedia market.
Your computer should work with DaVinci on a smaller project, but remember that it's designed for much more powerful machines. So it will overheat, and crash, and you won't be able to use any other apps at the same time.
You need to learn the basics and spend some time on it before you start to work with your project. But, then it's a pleasure because it's really a professional working environment, so you can make a high quality project.
 
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DaVinci is definitely a professional software, but it does require a professional-level computer to run, meaning it simply does not install on a simpler machine.
I try to use only open source software, and I truly believe this is as relevant a topic for humankind as it is permaculture or avoiding huge corporations products.
Of course, the most used video editors are commercial, and you'll have a hard time searching professional people and companies working with open source software. On the other hand, the open source community is usually friendly and helpful - like-minded, I'd say.
Some (free) open source video editors:

Shotcut
https://shotcut.org/

Openshot
https://www.openshot.org/

Flowblade
https://jliljebl.github.io/flowblade

Kdenlive
https://kdenlive.org/

I haven't tried neither Shotcut nor Openshot. They seem to be simple and effective.
I've tried Flowblade (it's linux-only), and liked it, but I use Kdenlive.
Editing video is probably the most demanding stuff you can do in your computer. If you're willing to use an average-spec computer to edit video, you'll need to use proxies - a way to replace the original video with low resolution versions. The final video will be rendered with your original clips, so there'll be no quality loss.
Both Flowblade and Kdenlive work with proxies - I don't know about the former two.
Flowblade states it was developed with stability in mind. This is the biggest issue you will have, regardless the editor you choose: the software crashing. I've been using Kdenlive for a few years, and have no problems, but I use Linux (I'm guessing you use Windows). Many people complain of Kdenlive crashes in Windows, even in Linux. The ideal would be having a dedicated computer only for editing, but it may not be a realistic option for most of us.
So, my suggestion is to install one or some of the editors mentioned, add one or two clips, generate proxies and apply some effects. Render it and see if it works. If you need help, have a look at the forums - they may be somewhat buried, like kdenlive's:

https://forum.kde.org/viewforum.php?f=263

Of course, there are many other communities for these softwares (aside the 'official' ones), for instance on reddit and facebook.
And if you want me to go into details, I'd be glad to help.
 
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Today I finally gave up.
Now, it's not the fault of the software.  The DaVinci software is amazing!  It does so much.
And... that is the problem.  I'm not ready yet.  My skill set isn't far enough along to make it do what I want.  After almost 6 weeks of trying to learn this, I decided I need a stepping stone.  

I downloaded the free version of Filmora today and learned how to use it in the morning.  This is an excellent stepping stone.  I can already see that I'll outgrow it in a few years, but by then, I'll have enough skill to use DaVinci.  
I'll start a new thread about Filmora once I get to know it better.  
 
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