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The Shed Thread  RSS feed

 
Burra Maluca
Mother Tree
Posts: 10014
Location: Portugal
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Leila complained that there weren't enough photos of sheds on permies. So I thought I'd start putting that to rights. Please feel free to add any interesting shed photos you have.

Here are some sheds from my village. I have reason to suspect that some of them were originally houses but they were never 'done up' and have fallen into disuse as the village has depopulated



We borrowed this one to store hay in one year.





This one was modernised last year!





 
Jeanine Gurley Jacildone
pollinator
Posts: 1426
Location: Midlands, South Carolina Zone 7b/8a
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Wow, I want to visit there. I will try to remember to post pics to our sheds. Not as picturesque as yours though. Our couple of small sheds are made from scraps of stuff.
 
Leila Rich
steward
Posts: 3999
Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
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Thanks Burra, nothing like a good-lookin' shed to cheer a girl up
Well mine consist of a leaky ply number and a rather warped galvanised prefab. Yip, I'm one of those tragic fantasists, with crappy sheds of my own...
But people with cool sheds...more, more!
 
gani et se
Posts: 215
Location: Douglas County OR
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Serious brick envy here -- look at those bricks in the shed (part of a now not so functional wall?) in the first pic!
 
Burra Maluca
Mother Tree
Posts: 10014
Location: Portugal
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Yeah - those bricks have always been a bit of a mystery to us. I don't think they are a wall, I think it's just that at some point the whole shed was filled with bricks and now the woodwork is starting to give way they are becoming an integral part of the structure. It's been like that ever since we first visited the village nearly ten years ago.

So does anyone else have some shed photos to share?

I have a few of our own sheds somewhere, which are significantly less attractive than the ones in the rest of the village, but just as interesting! I'll go dig them out when I get a chance...
 
Irene Kightley
pollinator
Posts: 387
Location: South West France
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Tom Painemaru asked me a while ago about our sheds, so if you want photos of shed's - here are some of ours.

All of them are basically the same, built to optimise solar gain in the winter and shade in the summer, add a solar panel if there's an electric fence or we want lights, built from wood cut where we made the shed, covered with whatever we had, add a gutter to capture water then plant climbers and other plants around them.

Goat shed









Goose shed





Sheep shed - the straw bale walls are 40 years old





Chicken shed











Pig sheds





















 
John Polk
steward
Posts: 8019
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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Irene, please stop posting photos. Every time you do, I turn green with envy! Just kidding.

 
Irene Kightley
pollinator
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Location: South West France
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John, all these sheds are made quickly from things close to hand - it's the compost inside them, the water they can collect and the planting around them that makes all the difference.
 
John Polk
steward
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Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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I get envious looking at all of your photos because everything looks so practical. Form follows function.
You are not wasting time/materials/money just so the neighbors can all say "Oh, how pretty". "Oh, si jolie."
It gets the job done, and that is the 'bottom line'.

 
Jeanine Gurley Jacildone
pollinator
Posts: 1426
Location: Midlands, South Carolina Zone 7b/8a
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These are like paintings!!
 
Dale Hodgins
gardener
Posts: 6795
Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
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To me a shed is a small storage building, usually un-heated with a simple roof to shed the rain.

I guess pigs can live in a shed. A cat moved into my shed and it shed hair everywhere.

If much work gets done in a shed, it has become a workshop. If one particular type of work gets done in there, the shed takes on the name of the activity or stored item.(potting shed,wood shed, tool shed) Oddly, if you drill a well inside, it becomes a well house even if it's smaller than your other sheds. Rent it out to an artist and you have a studio.

If you move in with far too much stuff, it's a hovel. If you are a very dirty housekeeper, it's a pig sty. If there are lots of little hovels on one property, you have a shanty town. A larger grouping on the edge of a city is a slum.

Thank you for shedding light on this subject.
 
Devon Olsen
Posts: 1067
Location: SE Wyoming -zone 4
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Irene Kightley
pollinator
Posts: 387
Location: South West France
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Thanks - but I'd like to see other people's sheds too !

Ps. I can't believe I really typed "...so if you want photos of shed's..." that apostrophe shouldn't be there - sorry !

I have lots of shed photos in a set here : http://flickriver.com/photos/hardworkinghippy/sets/72157602677271273/

You can tell I don't get out much eh ? lol



 
Leila Rich
steward
Posts: 3999
Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
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Mine aren't worthy of publication; maybe I'll scrounge among friends and family for some NZ sheds. They'll definitely be of the old packing-cases, bits of old corrugated iron and rusty bed bases variety...
I refuse to be intimidated by you Europeans and your careless, yet breathtaking shed glamour!
 
Jeanine Gurley Jacildone
pollinator
Posts: 1426
Location: Midlands, South Carolina Zone 7b/8a
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Well, here is my shed - I don't know if this counts. It was a screened in shed made of scrap lumber for my gardening stuff. Then I needed another coop since the turkeys took over the original one. So I slapped on some plastic lattice to help keep critters from tearing through the screen to get at the birds at night. I posted this in my 'projects' thread. http://www.permies.com/forums/posts/list/14906#132752
 
Eric Thomas
Posts: 108
Location: Northeast Oklahoma, Formerly Zone 6b, Now Officially Zone 7
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Irene, love your blogsite. I have an abundance here of, aptly named, post oak which we're harvesting. A lot of it is 15 -18 cm diameter and we're inspired by your constructions. What doesn't show clearly is your joining method. Can you elaborate?

Thanks..
 
Rion Mather
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Beautiful place, Irene.
 
Irene Kightley
pollinator
Posts: 387
Location: South West France
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Thanks Rion.

Eric, sorry it's taken so long for me to reply but I've been really busy in the garden and we had a concert here last week and I had to clean the place up a bit, then we had a load of visitors...

When you you say joining methods do you mean how we get the shed to stay up - I mean joining the posts to support the roof ?

We use large sections of wood then either use screws or use large nails to connect smaller sections of wood. We've loads of sweet chestnut poles because, sadly, the trees here are dying with canker.

I'll take photos if you need them.

 
Eric Thomas
Posts: 108
Location: Northeast Oklahoma, Formerly Zone 6b, Now Officially Zone 7
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No problem! We're up to our necks in tomatoes right now too. I'm interested in the joinery that you use to mend the individual pieces together; spikes, screws, wooden pegs, etc. Do you take the time to cut the mating pieces to fit? It's hard to see all the detail from your photos. We have an abundance of post oak that's all about 6 mt long and mostly straight as a string and only slightly tapered. My wife loves your stuff so I've got my marching orders...

Thanks
 
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