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Experienced Gardner with special circumstances this year

 
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So I broke my leg, had surgery and now I am wondering about my garden. Typically by this time of year I have already covered my garden with cardboard and mulch to let rest for 6 weeks before planting. This isn't an option this year. What is the best quick method for a garden? Just plant as usual and fight weeds all season? Straw bales?, raised beds? Just because of my current struggles with mobility, I hate to lose a whole season.
 
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Location: N. California
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So sorry for your injury.  It is such a bummer not to be able to do what you feel you need to do.  If you have been having good luck with your method I say you could stick with it.  When you are ready put your cardboard down, cover it with mulch, and cut holes where you put the plant.  You will get some weeds, but not as many as using nothing.
Or you could put the cardboard down, use wood or cement blocks to create a raised bed. Fill it with organic soil and or compost, and plant in that.
You could plant in large pots, or 5 gallon buckets with holes in the bottom.
I personally like my hugel beets.  It's a ton of work to put it in, but after it's built all I do is add a bit of compost each planting season.  I have been slowly replacing my raised beds with hugel beets.  To build a hugel beet you dig into the ground a couple of feet, what ever works for you.  Then line the bottom with wood, the largest you have, then a layer of soil, then smaller wood like branches, twigs, etc. Then soil,   then maybe compost or leave, grass clippings, or wood chips, then soil. It doesn't have to be just like this, it's just layers, getting smaller as you get closer to the top. I like to put finished compost on top.  I used cement blocks around two high.  It's easy to use, very few weeds, and grows veggies better than anything I have ever tried.  
What ever you decide good luck to you, hope you recover soon. Happy growing.
 
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There are many unknowns in your post. If you do not see the problem extending into next year, I would go with business as usual.  If you feel you need to prepare for the long term, I suggest raised beds ...2 ft high min.
 
master pollinator
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Location: Canadian Prairies - Zone 3b
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That's a difficult situation.

I'm not sure if you simply want to garden (I get that), or need the garden to produce your food. That changes things.

There is nothing wrong with leaving a garden fallow for a season, as long as you chop the weeds before they set seed. If you can plant some things (I would) the same rule applies.

I can't see how you could create raised beds with limited mobility. They are a ton of work. Do what you can with what you have IMO.

Luck!
 
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I am sorry to hear that you broke your leg. I would suggest doing the best you can do without exerting too much energy.

If you usually use transplants continue with that.  

If you usually plant seed indoors the that works or plant them outside, which is my method.

Cardboard to prevent weeds sounds good but you could forgo cardboard and just chop and drop the weeds.  Your choice!
 
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