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Log slabs as pathways... bad or good idea?

 
gardener
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The mobile sawmill has come to my village and left loads of sawdust and log slabs nobody seems to care for.
I immediately offered to help.
So now i am looking for things to do with them.
One of them i did, was creating a hard pathway between the new mint beds. The mint was creeping into the woodchips path i had previously made and i am afraid i will step on the mint all the time, damaging it. So now with the hard slab on there i got room to walk while maintenaning and harvesting.
It will be a while before they push through the slabs.
Has anybody who has done this any comment about this system? Do they make for great snale shelter for instance. Stuff like that i am curious about.
Or is this just a waste of perfect fencing material?
Tell me, tell me, tell me all.
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Posts: 61
Location: nw ohio
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chicken bee
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I find them to be slimy at times.  I do use two foot sections of boards from pallets to sprout seeds.  Is a great way to germinate seeds and works like a charm in the dry summer months.
 
pollinator
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They will make wonderful snail and slug daytime habitat. which you can use to your advantage, go out every few days, flip the boards and destroy the slugs/snails you find under them.
 
master gardener
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I've certainly used them as pathways and slug traps in the past. I figure that eventually they get a bit rotted, and then I'll bury them on edge to hold moisture in the soil.

At times we've used similar as fire wood, but it needs drying. It's bigger than kindling but smaller than chunks of wood.

The most important thing is to find uses on your land rather than it getting dumped in the land-fill or open burned with no benefit. If it's not burned as actual firewood, consider using a TLUD or trench to burn it for biochar if there's too much to deal with in more useful ways. For example, I'm using shavings from a portable sawmill for making char in a pot in our wood-stove. It had a year to dry though.
 
pollinator
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It's a wonderful problem to have. Bravo for seizing the opportunity! What kind of wood is it?

Slab lumber makes wonderful small, rustic sheds using the board-and-batten method. If constructed with an eye toward art and aesthetics, people will pay good money for them because they are unique.
 
gardener
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I would pay to have a load if these dropped off, so getting them for free seems great.
I also imagine these will create slug/snail habitat.
My own place is crawing with garter snakes  and lizards who love to live under slabs of wood, rock.or even cardboard, so snails and slugs have been well controled.
 
master gardener
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I wouldn’t hesitate to use them in my garden.   Elsewhere I have found they break down pretty fast.
 
pollinator
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They make great sides and ends for raised beds or planter boxes.
 
Hugo Morvan
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I’ve used them everywhere and they’re great. They shelter snails like crazy. Some are favorits some attract few. My chickens love snails for some reason so they were happy. They sheltered panthersnails which eat normal ones so they got spared.
I saw hazelworms and killed one young by stepping on it. Yuck.
They harbored the larvea of many bugs including rare giant rhinobugs. I don’t know their scientific name.
They are awkward by being slippery which keeps unwanted old people out.
They harbour the mycelium of the red winecap mushroom which florishes and devours whatever unfortunate plant lived there before i dumped the slab on it.
They kept the dutch white clover in check which attempted a gigantic take-over this year.
Simply i love them!
 
Doody calls. I would really rather that it didn't. Comfort me wise and sterile tiny ad:
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