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woodland care
instruction, regulation, insurance, safety, etc

Demonstrate the ability to develop a relationship with a woodland.   A healthy woodland is diverse and provides building materials, food, fuel and something that builds your soul.  Conventional forestry takes what makes the most cash and transforms the soil into lifeless dirt.  

Otis has met too many people that can’t put up even a single cord of firewood.  For many Otises, this is the very first metric they consider - can a person put up three cords of firewood in a day?  Experience with a sawmill or cleaving shakes is a bonus.  What more can you do?  

I think that woodland care is often about prepping materials. To be a sort of permaculture "home depot" for other projects.

sand badge
drop 6” to 8” dead standing tree with a bow saw
drop 6" to 8" dead standing tree with a chainsaw
drop 6” to 8” live tree with a bow saw
drop 6" to 8" live tree with a chainsaw
limb 4 trees
peel 2 live trees and put up off the ground to dry
split and stack dead standing wood as firewood
prep 10 junkpoles
cleave 6 shakes with a froe
Choose 1:
   - build 12 feet of junkpole fence
   - repair 24 feet of junkpole fence

straw badge
drop at least 12 trees 8” or larger in diameter:
one cord of firewood: cut and stacked properly under a roof (completion pic)
lumber
      o  a dozen 2x4s, 1x4s and ⅜x4s
twig construction
      o five foot tall tomato cage and eight foot tall pole bean trellis
36 feet of junkpole fence plus one mediocre gate with a mediocre latch
plant the tree seeds for 100 feet of living fence - show that 30% have sprouted
plant black locust tree seeds
plant 100 cleavers - show that 20 have sprouted
plant 100 nettles - show that 20 have sprouted
plant 20 willows - show that 10 have grown
innoculate two four foot logs with mushroom spawn and harvest at least a half pound of mushrooms
cleave 40 shakes with a fro

wood badge
put up three cords of firewood
more lumber
      o  8 dozen 2x4s, 1x4s and ⅜x4s
build six rock jacks out of split logs
120 feet of junkpole fence with one good gate and a good latch
plant 300 black locust seeds with 50% germination
plant 300 cleavers  with 50% germination
plant 300 nettles  with 50% germination
plant 60 willows with 50% growth
plant 40 sweet sap silver maples
plant 10 cedar trees
twig construction
      o six five foot tall tomato cages and three eight foot tall pole bean trellises
plant the tree seeds for 800 feet of living fence
lay 50 feet of living fence (aka laying a hedge)
berm shed
      o 8x8x8 with a five foot eave
gin pole
      o lift a 10 foot long, 12 inch diameter log 15 feet off the ground and place it on a structure
outdoor mushrooms
      o produce at least one pound each of oyster and shiitake mushrooms
indoor mushrooms
      o produce at least one pound each of enokitake, oyster and shiitake mushrooms
enhance garden beds with mycelium
skiddable firewood shed
cleave 200 shakes with a fro

iron badge
put up six cords of firewood
even more lumber
      o  two hundred 2x4s, 1x4s and ⅜x4s
build 24 rock jacks out of split logs
plant the tree seeds for 2000 feet of living fence
“lay the hedge” for 200 feet of living fence
humus well
junkpole fence around one acre (total of at least 836 feet) with four good gates and good latches
plant the seeds to restore a creek bed from a dry gully
      o 100 feet wide and 800 feet long
berm shed
      o 3 cells with five foot eaves, each cell is 12x12x12
build two skiddable structures
bigger gin pole
      o lift a 20 foot long, 18 inch diameter log 20 feet off the ground and place it on a structure
produce at least ten pounds each of oyster and shiitake mushrooms
COMMENTS:
 
pollinator
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I commented on the Gardening Badge about how some requirements are impossible for people. Some points in regard to the Woodland Care badge as applied to my own location.....

... There are no dead standing trees in my district that aren't on State or County land, or that aren't Ohia which we have been ordered not to cut down or use as firewood. The chances of finding one is extremely low, and getting landowner's permission without my being licensed and fully insured is as close to zero as one could get.  
... junkpoles may be abundant in Montana, but there is nothing but twisted & contorted Christmasberry and wild guava here that would remotely be classified as junkpole. While I specifically grow strawberry guava for pole use, they are seldom over 1 1/4" diameter, and not abundant since the State release a predatory insect to control them.
... black locust doesn't grow here
... I don't know what cleavers are
... Nettles don't exist here
... Willows don't grow here
... maples don't grow here
... cedars don't grow in my area
... no creeks exist in my area
... don't grow here or won't survive: apple, walnut, oak, peach, chestnut, rhubarb, hickory, pecan

Badge requirements might be better tweeted to specific circumstances. Flexible substitutions might be an answer.
 
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Su,

PEP stuff is optimized for my property in montana.   I suspect that there will be people in the US, Canada and several other countries that will be able to do PEP stuff without a problem.

For hawaii, I think somebody might explore the idea of making a PES program (permaculture experience according to Su Ba).  

 
Su Ba
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ok Paul, I've caught on. It's for your place. Just call me a bit dense because I had assumed it was some sort of "Boy Scout Badge" permies program. But I like the overall idea and will be presenting it to our little local Ka'u Farm School.
 
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If there's going to be a natural building badge, might the berm shed and gin pole fit better in there?  

What's a cleaver?  Other than a cool knife...

Was the last item on the iron badge supposed to be verify 6 wood badges (instead of sand)?

Is there anything for knowing which trees to leave and which to cut on a broader scale?  Identifying existing support trees or nest cavities or the like.  Maybe it's a given for how you run the place but those kinds of topics may align with "woodland care".
 
paul wheaton
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Mike Jay wrote:If there's going to be a natural building badge, might the berm shed and gin pole fit better in there?  



I did a lot of back and forth and, in the end, decided it should be here.


What's a cleaver?  Other than a cool knife...



Also known as "bed straw"


Was the last item on the iron badge supposed to be verify 6 wood badges (instead of sand)?



people working on their iron badge validate straw badges.  After people have completed their iron badge, they might help validate people working on their wood badges.


Is there anything for knowing which trees to leave and which to cut on a broader scale?  Identifying existing support trees or nest cavities or the like.  Maybe it's a given for how you run the place but those kinds of topics may align with "woodland care".



Soon we will create the BB threads and we will describe it in more detail there.




 
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The following is understanding that PEP=Permaculture Experiences (according to) Paul, the idea is generalizing some tasks. I wonder if instead of having specific species like black locust or willow, the plants listed should be based on function. There might also be a list of plants (surely some lists already exist out on them interwebs) which fulfill each category, including the growing range like USDA zones, as well as water needs once established (arid - dry - moderate - wet - rainforest).

So instead of saying black locust, perhaps you use "nitrogen fixing tree" or "silvopasture leaf fodder" or "rot resistant wood". Then a person looks at a list like "Nitrogen Fixer Trees: Black Locust, Mimosa, Alder, Redbud, Autumn Olive, Kentucky Coffee Tree, Golden Chain Tree, Acacia, Mesquite, etc etc" and they can find something which will adapt to their existing environment?
 
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Shawn Klassen-Koop wrote:

sand badge
drop 6” to 8” dead standing tree with a bow saw (action pic)
drop 6” to 8” dead standing tree with a chainsaw (action pic)
drop 6” to 8” live tree with a bow saw (action pic)
drop 6” to 8” live tree with a chainsaw (action pic)
limb 4 trees (4 completion pics)
peel live trees and put up off the ground to dry (2 completion pics)
split and stack dead standing wood as firewood
      o at least one half of a face cord
      o stacked to stay dry
      o completion pic
prep 10 junkpoles
      o cut, limb and stack off of the ground
      o completion pic
repair 24 feet of junkpole fence
cleave 6 shakes with a fro



Can this all really get done in the 5 hours that a sand badge is supposed to take?
 
paul wheaton
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Nicole Alderman wrote:Can this all really get done in the 5 hours that a sand badge is supposed to take?



First, it doesn't matter how long it takes, because it is the same tasks for everybody to get this badge.

Next, as we were sizing this up, we put some thought into how long it would take a pro just trying to whip through the badges.   And we put some time into thinking how long it would take a newbie who has all the tools in front of them and has now watched a bunch of youtube videos.   And we put some time into how long it would take a newbie in a formal class after hearing from the instructor and watching the instructor do it.  We wish to measure the time for the experience.   Not the youtube time, not the "gotta root around the shop and find my tools because I am more disorganized than other people" time, not the "gotta clean and sterilize my workspace afterward, because i think a shop should be sterile" time.    

So as shawn and I poured through these badges, we were focused on the time it would take to have the experience.  

Yesterday I peeled a dry stick to be my dry pegs in green wood.   The green wood is ready for holes.  But how big of holes do I need?  I couldn't find my calipers.   I could just use a tape measure and eyeball it, but I want a good solid fit.  And my eyeballs with a tape measure measuring a round thing like this has been off by a pinch before.   I want my calipers.   After a fair bit of search I decided to order some (chalk this up to "tool burn").  In the meantime I am going to move on to the next project.

I've put dry pegs in green wood before.   It is a freaky quick thing.   Do I count the hunt for calipers?

I could move on without the calipers, but that changes the task from "this is simple, elegant and magnificent" to "gotta get it it done - cutting a few corners is fine".   I just want to do it with calipers.  With calipers it is a soul building experience.  Without calipers, it is a soul draining experience.



 
Nicole Alderman
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THANK YOU!

I was honestly wondering, because as someone with absolutely no skill in this, the list seemed really overwhelming and impossible, but that's because I honestly had no idea how long it would take.

I totally understand determining the time by how much time it would take a person to do the task if they had had everything prepared and did everything right.

Like when I carved my spoon. It probably took 3-4 hours, but's that's because I didn't split the wood like tutorial shows, and also used seasoned wood. I imagine if I'd done everything the way the video showed, it probably would have taken less than an hour.
 
paul wheaton
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green wood and sharp tools will make your first spoon go pretty quick.
 
paul wheaton
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I want to add in here somewhere something about creating slab wood using the swing blade sawmill.
 
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paul wheaton wrote:I want to add in here somewhere something about creating slab wood using the swing blade sawmill.



Could you elaborate on this? I assume you mean making something useful from the slab wood off a sawmill so it does not go to waste?

I mean know what a swing sawmill is, and they are cool, but I only know of one person in my community that has one. :-(
 
paul wheaton
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I think that woodland care is often about prepping materials.   To be a sort of permaculture "home depot" for other projects.  

With a swingblade, you carve a bunch of lumber off the top of a log, then flip the log over and carve some lumber off the other side.   The result is a slab.

 
Mike Haasl
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I hadn't heard of a swing blade sawmill.  Here's a youtube video for it (skip to 1/2 way through it).  At first I thought you were talking about a chainsaw mill...
 
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Travis Johnson
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paul wheaton wrote:I think that woodland care is often about prepping materials.   To be a sort of permaculture "home depot" for other projects.  

With a swingblade, you carve a bunch of lumber off the top of a log, then flip the log over and carve some lumber off the other side.   The result is a slab.



That is true, however they have a few deficiencies as well.

The biggest is that they use a sawblade, so the kerf is much thicker then a bandsaw blade. This does not seem like much, but really adds up. A bandsaw mill has a kerf of less than 1/16 of an inch, so for every 16 boards I saw, I lose one board to sawdust. With my rotary mill I lose a board to sawdust for every 3 boards I cut. That is why you always see swing mills with big logs on them, they do not do so well with small logs.

The other aspect is that they have a lot of moving parts. On a sawmill, if it moves, it breaks. It also wears, and everything that wears gets transferred directly to the sawcut.

I have about every kind of sawmill there is, but for these reasons, not a swing blade sawmill. I had a chainsaw sawmill but converted it over to a bandsaw mill, so now I have (2) band sawmills, a rotary sawmill, and even a shingle mill for making cedar shingles.

Myself, and this is just my opinion, I would have the requirement to be; someone fabricating their own sawmill. I have built two, and there is nothing easy about it. I will never be without a sawmill, so I know their value, but I am not sure the reason for the requirement for a Swing Sawmill. They have some great attributes, like amazing production, but that I not what homesteaders need.
 
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I had never heard of a swingblade. I spent time on youtube watching. Omg! Those are bad ass!

It's like prime rib. You slice off what you want and sit down to eat. The rest can be eaten later. Except with logs....and you don't eat it.
 
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Yeah, I hadn't either.  Looks a bit fancier than a circular saw so it's probably hard to DIY...
 
wayne fajkus
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I saw plenty of diy. I think electric motor is the key. Makes pivoting easier cause of direct shaft. With gas, the motor would have to turn sideways to pivot blade unless you added complications of belts and cogs.  Unless its based off of a chainsaw, which can cut sideways or straight up . Concrete cutters are chainsaw based and they take a decent blade.

Heck. A big grinder could do it. Just need an extension to move blade further away from tool. Easily milled out at machine shop.
 
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I'm not seeing anything about coppicing--did you want that to be a part of this badge? It was mentioned on the aspects page. Did I just miss it?
 
paul wheaton
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Daron Williams wrote:I'm not seeing anything about coppicing--did you want that to be a part of this badge? It was mentioned on the aspects page. Did I just miss it?



Good one.  

For there to be coppicing, I would need to have coppicing species growing here that are big enough to coppice.

 
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I would change "bow saw" to hand saw.  I believe the intention is human powered and for those fortunate enough to have a cross-cut saw they should be able to use it.
 
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Mark Tudor wrote:The following is understanding that PEP=Permaculture Experiences (according to) Paul, the idea is generalizing some tasks. I wonder if instead of having specific species like black locust or willow, the plants listed should be based on function. There might also be a list of plants (surely some lists already exist out on them interwebs) which fulfill each category, including the growing range like USDA zones, as well as water needs once established (arid - dry - moderate - wet - rainforest).

So instead of saying black locust, perhaps you use "nitrogen fixing tree" or "silvopasture leaf fodder" or "rot resistant wood". Then a person looks at a list like "Nitrogen Fixer Trees: Black Locust, Mimosa, Alder, Redbud, Autumn Olive, Kentucky Coffee Tree, Golden Chain Tree, Acacia, Mesquite, etc etc" and they can find something which will adapt to their existing environment?



Mark I like your suggestion for adapting to different locales/growing zones.  I always learn a lot from reading these threads...like for example that the Mimosa and Redbuds are nitrogen fixing.  They are both growing on my property - I planted them over the years.  Nice to know they are beneficial for the perennials added to the primarily late succession land.
 
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Jerry Ward wrote:I would change "bow saw" to hand saw.  I believe the intention is human powered and for those fortunate enough to have a cross-cut saw they should be able to use it.



Agreed!
 
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In the text of the BB (follow the links at the top) it does say that any hand tools are allowed.
 
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Nicole Alderman
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Congratulations! You are now the proud owner of your sixth super shiny sand badge!
 
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paul wheaton wrote:Su,

PEP stuff is optimized for my property in montana.   I suspect that there will be people in the US, Canada and several other countries that will be able to do PEP stuff without a problem.

For hawaii, I think somebody might explore the idea of making a PES program (permaculture experience according to Su Ba).  



Would there be corresponding badges?

There are so many possibilities for regional variations. For people in deforested areas, it would not be a question of converting forest to woodland, but of converting open land to woodland. In my part of the Dominican Republic, there are riparian woodland corridors along streams, and shade-grown cacao, but other than that, it is all deforested, mostly open pasture. The original rainforest cover has been gone a long time.
 
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Jason Hernandez wrote:
Would there be corresponding badges?



I think there will be, yes!

This thread talks about PEX badges and you can see what they will look like.
https://permies.com/t/128957/skills-inherit-property/PEXes-PEXs-Support-PEX-badges

 
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What is the purpose of the lumber sawn to the dimensions of ⅜ inch x 4 inch x 8'? I am having a conceptual failing to understand what green wood sawn to those dimensions could be used for.

Once it is milled half the thickness or more will be gone, so it will be used in a rough sawn state. Kindling (why mill it, waste of tooth life). Shakes are tapered, siding board and bat should be 0.75-1" shiplap 0.5"-0.75".
Don't think you are making homemade plywood or glue laminated chair rails.
It is almost as thin as a saw kerf. Then there is air drying how stable will ⅜ inch be?

I can come up with reasons to have wood that thick after it has seasoned to a sub 15% moisture content.
The thinnest wood that is reasonable to me seems to be 5/8" lumber; and that is limited to getting a high volume of boards for pallet wood out of junkie timber.

 
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I'm with you Brewer.  I think they mill a lot of lumber that size at Paul's place and use it for rustic interior siding like in this picture from a cabin there:

 
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So left rough and put up green in lieu of drywall. Might work well as lathe to plaster over as well if ripped into 1-2" strips. I'd want to add a 1/16th to 3/16th to ship lap it and get a tighter wall.

Thank you for the picture of the red cabin, first I've seen of the interior.

Getting those dimensions with the equipment I have (and have access to) is going to pose some interesting challenges. Drop the trees in the the winter when the sap has receded and the log has a lower moisture content.  Several layers will be gang straight line ripped.  The circular saw mill wanders a bit too much for a consistent depth of cut. Doable but less margin for error.  Would have preferred not to be constrained by the four inch width, and have the siding/cladding/boxing given as a surface area and thickness to minimize waste. But if I cut enough to spec maybe.

While I can cut and mill to a spec; understand it's purpose prevents it from becoming a pollutant or expensive kindling.

Thank you Mike and pardon the ramblings.

 
Mike Haasl
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No problem, I'm getting ready to cut my wood as well in a week or two.  I have no need for that size other than to satisfy the BB.  But I will probably let it dry and then trim the edges nice and square and use them for some low grade siding somewhere.
 
Mike Haasl
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Hey, it looks like the requirements for the "make lumber" BBs just got adjusted to allow you to make the pieces bigger than specified!  Yay!
 
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Here is my submission for the Woodland Care Sand Badge.  You can check out my profile page here.

  Drop 6” to 8” Live Tree with a Hand Saw
  Drop 6" to 8" Live Tree with a Chainsaw
  Drop 6" to 8" Dead Standing Tree with a Chainsaw
  Drop 6” To 8” Dead Standing Tree with a Hand Saw
  Limb 4 Trees
  Peel 2 Live Trees and Put Up Off the Ground to Dry
  Split and Stack Dead Standing Wood as Firewood - 1/2 Facing Cord
  Prep 10 Junkpoles
  Build 12 Feet of Junkpole Fence
  Cleave 6 Shakes with a Froe
Staff note (Nicole Alderman) :

I hereby certify that you are now the owner of a shiny Woodland Care Sand Badge. Congratulations!

 
A lot of people cry when they cut onions. The trick is not to form an emotional bond. This tiny ad told me:
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