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(note:  this document is still under construction - feel free to comment!)

general

transition from forest to woodland.  Less conifers, more deciduous trees.  

sand badge
drop 6” to 8” dead standing tree with a bow saw
drop 6" to 8" dead standing tree with a chainsaw
drop 6” to 8” live tree with a bow saw
drop 6" to 8" live tree with a chainsaw
limb 4 trees
peel 2 live trees and put up off the ground to dry
split and stack dead standing wood as firewood
prep 10 junkpoles
repair 24 feet of junkpole fence
cleave 6 shakes with a froe

straw badge
drop at least 12 trees 8” to 14” in diameter:
      o at least one 14” tree
      o at least one with a bow saw (action pic)
      o all with the timber tool
      o take pics to prove proper tree harvest selection
      o one cord of firewood: cut and stacked properly under a roof (completion pic)
      o lumber
            - a dozen 2x4s eight feet long
            - a dozen 1x5s eight feet long
            - a dozen ⅜ inch by 4 inch eight feet long
            - properly stickered and covered for air drying
            - completion pic(s)
      o set aside at least three logs
            - full tree length
            - peeled
            - up off the ground for proper air drying
                   o does not need to be under a roof
            - completion pic
      o all dropped trees are properly cared for
            - each tree is used in some way or is preserved for future use
            - no trees are left on the ground to rot
      o document proper tree selection
twig construction
      o jute lashing, no metal
      o one five foot tall tomato cage (completion pic)
      o one eight foot tall pole bean trellis (completion pic)
36 feet of junkpole fence plus one mediocre gate with a mediocre latch
      o 12 foot long segments, so 3 to 4 posts for the fence (completion pic)
      o gate will be 3 feet wide or wider and will require an additional post
            - pic of gate
            - pic of latch
            - pic of other side of latch
      o pic of proper tree harvest selection
plant the tree seeds for 100 feet of living fence
      o verify a 30% (or better) germination rate
      o quick video moving over the row
plant black locust tree seeds
      o 40 with scarification
      o 40 with another type of scarification
      o 40 without scarification
      o all seeds are planted in a row, each seed is planted two feet apart, quick video over each row showing germination
plant 100 cleavers
      o plant in a row, twelve inches apart
      o quick video over row showing that at least 20 have germinated
plant 100 nettles - show that 20 have sprouted
      o plant in a row, twelve inches apart
      o quick video over row showing that at least 20 have germinated
plant 20 willows - show that 10 have grown
      o plant in a row, 2 feet apart
      o quick video over row showing freshly planted
      o quick video over row showing that at least half have grown
innoculate two four foot logs with mushroom spawn and harvest at least a half pound of mushrooms (completion of logs pic and action shot of harvest)
cleave 40 shakes with a fro

wood badge
put up three cords of firewood (completion pics)
lumber
      o 8 dozen 2x4s eight feet long
      o 8 dozen 1x4s eight feet long
      o 8 dozen ⅜ inch by 4 inch eight feet long
      o completion pic(s)
build six rock jacks out of split logs (completion pics)
120 feet of junkpole fence with one good gate and a good latch (completion pics)
plant 300 black locust seeds with 50% germination
plant 300 cleavers  with 50% germination
plant 300 nettles  with 50% germination
plant 60 willows with 50% growth
plant 40 sweet sap silver maples
plant 10 cedar trees
twig construction
      o jute lashing, no metal
      o six five foot tall tomato cages
      o three eight foot tall pole bean trellises
plant the tree seeds for 800 feet of living fence
lay 50 feet of living fence (aka laying a hedge)
berm shed
      o 8x8x8
      o five foot eave
gin pole
      o lift a 10 foot long, 12 inch diameter log 15 feet off the ground and place it on a structure
outdoor mushrooms
      o produce at least one pound of each
            - oyster mushrooms
            - shitake mushrooms
indoor mushrooms
      o produce at least one pound of each
            - enokitake mushrooms
            - oyster mushrooms
            - shitake mushrooms
mycelium
      o enhance garden beds with mycelium
            - photo evidence that it helped in 3 scenarios
skiddable firewood shed
      o holds one cord
cleave 200 shakes with a fro
validate the sand badge of six others

iron badge
put up six cords of firewood (completion pics)
lumber
      o 200 2x4s eight feet long
      o 200 1x4s eight feet long
      o 200 ⅜ inch by 4 inch eight feet long
      o completion pic(s)
build 24 rock jacks out of split logs (completion pics)
plant the tree seeds for 2000 feet of living fence
“lay the hedge” for 200 feet of living fence
humus well
      o pics of many stages of construction
junkpole fence around one acre (total of at least 836 feet) with four good gates and good latches (completion pics)
plant the seeds to restore a creek bed from a dry gully
      o 100 feet wide and 800 feet long
      o seeds are planted in diagonal rows, 3 feet apart (each planting row will then be 141 feet long - 47 seeds, 267 rows. 12,500 seeds)
      o each row is 3 feet apart
      o apple, walnut, oak, peach, chestnut, butternut, rhubarb, alfalfa, hickory, pecan (others?)
      o pics of the plot and the row markers when planting
      o video of growth verification at a foot tall (or more, average) for each row
      o take out all conifers
berm shed
      o each cell is 12x12x12
      o 3 cells
      o 5 foot eave
build two skiddable structures
gin pole
      o lift a 20 foot long, 18 inch diameter log 20 feet off the ground and place it on a structure
produce at least ten pounds of each
      o oyster mushrooms
      o shitake mushrooms
validate the straw badge of six others
COMMENTS:
 
pollinator
Posts: 1318
Location: Big Island, Hawaii (2300' elevation, 60" avg. annual rainfall, temp range 55-80 degrees F)
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I commented on the Gardening Badge about how some requirements are impossible for people. Some points in regard to the Woodland Care badge as applied to my own location.....

... There are no dead standing trees in my district that aren't on State or County land, or that aren't Ohia which we have been ordered not to cut down or use as firewood. The chances of finding one is extremely low, and getting landowner's permission without my being licensed and fully insured is as close to zero as one could get.  
... junkpoles may be abundant in Montana, but there is nothing but twisted & contorted Christmasberry and wild guava here that would remotely be classified as junkpole. While I specifically grow strawberry guava for pole use, they are seldom over 1 1/4" diameter, and not abundant since the State release a predatory insect to control them.
... black locust doesn't grow here
... I don't know what cleavers are
... Nettles don't exist here
... Willows don't grow here
... maples don't grow here
... cedars don't grow in my area
... no creeks exist in my area
... don't grow here or won't survive: apple, walnut, oak, peach, chestnut, rhubarb, hickory, pecan

Badge requirements might be better tweeted to specific circumstances. Flexible substitutions might be an answer.
 
master steward
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Su,

PEP stuff is optimized for my property in montana.   I suspect that there will be people in the US, Canada and several other countries that will be able to do PEP stuff without a problem.

For hawaii, I think somebody might explore the idea of making a PES program (permaculture experience according to Su Ba).  

 
Su Ba
pollinator
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ok Paul, I've caught on. It's for your place. Just call me a bit dense because I had assumed it was some sort of "Boy Scout Badge" permies program. But I like the overall idea and will be presenting it to our little local Ka'u Farm School.
 
master steward
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If there's going to be a natural building badge, might the berm shed and gin pole fit better in there?  

What's a cleaver?  Other than a cool knife...

Was the last item on the iron badge supposed to be verify 6 wood badges (instead of sand)?

Is there anything for knowing which trees to leave and which to cut on a broader scale?  Identifying existing support trees or nest cavities or the like.  Maybe it's a given for how you run the place but those kinds of topics may align with "woodland care".
 
paul wheaton
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Mike Jay wrote:If there's going to be a natural building badge, might the berm shed and gin pole fit better in there?  



I did a lot of back and forth and, in the end, decided it should be here.


What's a cleaver?  Other than a cool knife...



Also known as "bed straw"


Was the last item on the iron badge supposed to be verify 6 wood badges (instead of sand)?



people working on their iron badge validate straw badges.  After people have completed their iron badge, they might help validate people working on their wood badges.


Is there anything for knowing which trees to leave and which to cut on a broader scale?  Identifying existing support trees or nest cavities or the like.  Maybe it's a given for how you run the place but those kinds of topics may align with "woodland care".



Soon we will create the BB threads and we will describe it in more detail there.




 
gardener
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The following is understanding that PEP=Permaculture Experiences (according to) Paul, the idea is generalizing some tasks. I wonder if instead of having specific species like black locust or willow, the plants listed should be based on function. There might also be a list of plants (surely some lists already exist out on them interwebs) which fulfill each category, including the growing range like USDA zones, as well as water needs once established (arid - dry - moderate - wet - rainforest).

So instead of saying black locust, perhaps you use "nitrogen fixing tree" or "silvopasture leaf fodder" or "rot resistant wood". Then a person looks at a list like "Nitrogen Fixer Trees: Black Locust, Mimosa, Alder, Redbud, Autumn Olive, Kentucky Coffee Tree, Golden Chain Tree, Acacia, Mesquite, etc etc" and they can find something which will adapt to their existing environment?
 
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Shawn Klassen-Koop wrote:

sand badge
drop 6” to 8” dead standing tree with a bow saw (action pic)
drop 6” to 8” dead standing tree with a chainsaw (action pic)
drop 6” to 8” live tree with a bow saw (action pic)
drop 6” to 8” live tree with a chainsaw (action pic)
limb 4 trees (4 completion pics)
peel live trees and put up off the ground to dry (2 completion pics)
split and stack dead standing wood as firewood
      o at least one half of a face cord
      o stacked to stay dry
      o completion pic
prep 10 junkpoles
      o cut, limb and stack off of the ground
      o completion pic
repair 24 feet of junkpole fence
cleave 6 shakes with a fro



Can this all really get done in the 5 hours that a sand badge is supposed to take?
 
paul wheaton
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Nicole Alderman wrote:Can this all really get done in the 5 hours that a sand badge is supposed to take?



First, it doesn't matter how long it takes, because it is the same tasks for everybody to get this badge.

Next, as we were sizing this up, we put some thought into how long it would take a pro just trying to whip through the badges.   And we put some time into thinking how long it would take a newbie who has all the tools in front of them and has now watched a bunch of youtube videos.   And we put some time into how long it would take a newbie in a formal class after hearing from the instructor and watching the instructor do it.  We wish to measure the time for the experience.   Not the youtube time, not the "gotta root around the shop and find my tools because I am more disorganized than other people" time, not the "gotta clean and sterilize my workspace afterward, because i think a shop should be sterile" time.    

So as shawn and I poured through these badges, we were focused on the time it would take to have the experience.  

Yesterday I peeled a dry stick to be my dry pegs in green wood.   The green wood is ready for holes.  But how big of holes do I need?  I couldn't find my calipers.   I could just use a tape measure and eyeball it, but I want a good solid fit.  And my eyeballs with a tape measure measuring a round thing like this has been off by a pinch before.   I want my calipers.   After a fair bit of search I decided to order some (chalk this up to "tool burn").  In the meantime I am going to move on to the next project.

I've put dry pegs in green wood before.   It is a freaky quick thing.   Do I count the hunt for calipers?

I could move on without the calipers, but that changes the task from "this is simple, elegant and magnificent" to "gotta get it it done - cutting a few corners is fine".   I just want to do it with calipers.  With calipers it is a soul building experience.  Without calipers, it is a soul draining experience.



 
Nicole Alderman
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THANK YOU!

I was honestly wondering, because as someone with absolutely no skill in this, the list seemed really overwhelming and impossible, but that's because I honestly had no idea how long it would take.

I totally understand determining the time by how much time it would take a person to do the task if they had had everything prepared and did everything right.

Like when I carved my spoon. It probably took 3-4 hours, but's that's because I didn't split the wood like tutorial shows, and also used seasoned wood. I imagine if I'd done everything the way the video showed, it probably would have taken less than an hour.
 
paul wheaton
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green wood and sharp tools will make your first spoon go pretty quick.
 
paul wheaton
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I want to add in here somewhere something about creating slab wood using the swing blade sawmill.
 
pollinator
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paul wheaton wrote:I want to add in here somewhere something about creating slab wood using the swing blade sawmill.



Could you elaborate on this? I assume you mean making something useful from the slab wood off a sawmill so it does not go to waste?

I mean know what a swing sawmill is, and they are cool, but I only know of one person in my community that has one. :-(
 
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I think that woodland care is often about prepping materials.   To be a sort of permaculture "home depot" for other projects.  

With a swingblade, you carve a bunch of lumber off the top of a log, then flip the log over and carve some lumber off the other side.   The result is a slab.

 
Mike Jay
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I hadn't heard of a swing blade sawmill.  Here's a youtube video for it (skip to 1/2 way through it).  At first I thought you were talking about a chainsaw mill...
 
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Travis Johnson
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paul wheaton wrote:I think that woodland care is often about prepping materials.   To be a sort of permaculture "home depot" for other projects.  

With a swingblade, you carve a bunch of lumber off the top of a log, then flip the log over and carve some lumber off the other side.   The result is a slab.



That is true, however they have a few deficiencies as well.

The biggest is that they use a sawblade, so the kerf is much thicker then a bandsaw blade. This does not seem like much, but really adds up. A bandsaw mill has a kerf of less than 1/16 of an inch, so for every 16 boards I saw, I lose one board to sawdust. With my rotary mill I lose a board to sawdust for every 3 boards I cut. That is why you always see swing mills with big logs on them, they do not do so well with small logs.

The other aspect is that they have a lot of moving parts. On a sawmill, if it moves, it breaks. It also wears, and everything that wears gets transferred directly to the sawcut.

I have about every kind of sawmill there is, but for these reasons, not a swing blade sawmill. I had a chainsaw sawmill but converted it over to a bandsaw mill, so now I have (2) band sawmills, a rotary sawmill, and even a shingle mill for making cedar shingles.

Myself, and this is just my opinion, I would have the requirement to be; someone fabricating their own sawmill. I have built two, and there is nothing easy about it. I will never be without a sawmill, so I know their value, but I am not sure the reason for the requirement for a Swing Sawmill. They have some great attributes, like amazing production, but that I not what homesteaders need.
 
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I had never heard of a swingblade. I spent time on youtube watching. Omg! Those are bad ass!

It's like prime rib. You slice off what you want and sit down to eat. The rest can be eaten later. Except with logs....and you don't eat it.
 
Mike Jay
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Yeah, I hadn't either.  Looks a bit fancier than a circular saw so it's probably hard to DIY...
 
wayne fajkus
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I saw plenty of diy. I think electric motor is the key. Makes pivoting easier cause of direct shaft. With gas, the motor would have to turn sideways to pivot blade unless you added complications of belts and cogs.  Unless its based off of a chainsaw, which can cut sideways or straight up . Concrete cutters are chainsaw based and they take a decent blade.

Heck. A big grinder could do it. Just need an extension to move blade further away from tool. Easily milled out at machine shop.
 
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I'm not seeing anything about coppicing--did you want that to be a part of this badge? It was mentioned on the aspects page. Did I just miss it?
 
paul wheaton
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Daron Williams wrote:I'm not seeing anything about coppicing--did you want that to be a part of this badge? It was mentioned on the aspects page. Did I just miss it?



Good one.  

For there to be coppicing, I would need to have coppicing species growing here that are big enough to coppice.

 
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I would change "bow saw" to hand saw.  I believe the intention is human powered and for those fortunate enough to have a cross-cut saw they should be able to use it.
 
We've gotta get close enough to that helmet to pull the choke on it's engine and flood his mind! Or, we could just read this tiny ad:
Permaculture Design Course in Divinya - a yogic community in Sweden
https://permies.com/t/106159/permaculture-design/Permaculture-Design-Divinya-yogic-community
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