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Recommendations for how to use a 19th century hand hewn log cabin

 
Jim Aldridge
Posts: 16
Location: Cumberland Plateau, Tennessee
3
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We bought property in 2018 that had an old structure on it. After examining the structure further, we discovered that, under the siding, it was a hand hewn log cabin built in the lare 1800's. Currently, I am leaning towards taking it down  moving it to another part of the property, and setting it up as a "pioneer cabin," restored to its original state with an outhouse (composting toilet), wood burning stove, rope beds, etc.  I don't want it to just deteriorate, so I want to find some sort of use for it, even if it just guest quarters for folks who want to experience a pioneer lifestyle or homage to the history of the area.

Can you think of other uses it might better have on a permaculture homestead?
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Anne Miller
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Posts: 5075
Location: USDA Zone 8a
1554
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Jim, that is a beautiful piece of history.

I like your idea to:

taking it down  moving it to another part of the property, and setting it up as a "pioneer cabin," restored to its original state with an outhouse (composting toilet), wood burning stove, rope beds, etc.



Sounds to me like it would make a great Airbnb!
 
Jay Angler
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Posts: 4492
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
1668
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My in-laws had something similar and it was their "get-away" place every summer until they were well over 80 y.o.

The key thing to keeping the building much longer is to pay attention to the foundation. The in-laws spent the money to shore up and repair their foundation when the bought it. Some neighbors either didn't have the money, or didn't care, and by the time they did care, it was too late and that house was irretrievable.

I think saving the history is a great thing - either for renting, or as a studio/workshop for something like fabric arts. I could think of a hundred uses for it, but that's my nature. The questions I'd contemplate are: what are your interests, what would interest those in your community, what sort of square footage is this cabin, etc.
 
Glenn Herbert
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Posts: 3478
Location: Upstate NY, zone 5
210
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Great resource, lovely structure. Why are you thinking of moving it? Is the current location bad or in the way of other plans? Could you consider incorporating it into your building plans? I know I would love to have something like that to work around/with. As a young architectural designer, I designed my house on the family property from scratch, but if the 1892 barn had been in an acceptable location, I would have used that as a structural base.
 
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