• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Please reassure me - bindweed and thistles

 
Alison Thomas
pollinator
Posts: 933
Location: France
9
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Now I should love the thistle being my national Scottish emblem BUT it's totally invading the grass areas here in France making the grass almost no-go areas for our children.  The geese ain't keen on it either.  Nor are they keen on bindweed and that keeps on popping up in the veg patch as well.

I'm now trying to follow Paul Wheaton's lawn care regime for the cheap and lazy but I need some reassurance that by chopping off all the green bits by hand the plant will vanish ( I realise that other seeds may drift in).  I'm not scared of hard work but I just don't want to waste my time endlessly going round chopping off the tops (there are hundreds of them).

And what about hoeing in the veg patch?  Does it just chop up the root of the bindweed such that it laughs and goes on to make yet another plant.  It's choking everything in the way of good food.
 
                          
Posts: 37
Location: Western Washington
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Where I used to live, I had a hell of a problem with Canadian thistle.

Then I got goats.  And those goats had more goats.   

Anyway, the goat ate the thistle.  They ate it before it could go to seed and then they ate it down to the ground, eventually killing the plant itself.

It wasn't an overnight fix; in fact, the whole process took several years.  But by the time I moved from there, there was no thistle.  Not much else, either, including my fruit trees and rose bushes they managed to get into.   
 
paul wheaton
master steward
Posts: 20470
Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
bee chicken hugelkultur trees wofati woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Two bonus tips:


1)  You have kids!  Good!  If they get in trouble, tell them "you owe be a can full of thistles!  Get picking!"

2)  The tips in the article will help a lot, but not 100%.  So this will beat them 100%.  Break your lawn into ten zones, numbered 1 to 10.  One day, go an pull all the bindweed and thistle from zone 1.  You might think that on the second day you will go and pull the bindweed and thistles from zone 2, but you would be wrong.  Go and pull them from zone 1 again.  It should go much faster because you did such a thorough job yesterday.  THEN go to zone 2.  On day three, pull the thistle and bindweed from zone 1, then zone 2 and then zone 3.  ..... I've done this and it does work.  100%.

 
Alison Thomas
pollinator
Posts: 933
Location: France
9
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Ok Cinebar, I was thinking about goats anyway and this makes me even more keen.  But I think they'll wreck the orchard so...

Ok Paul, I hear what you're saying and my gloves are at the ready for the orchard.  One question - does this go on forever? Like every single day having to go out and pull thistles and bindweed, or do they give up in the end?

And the other unanswered question in my original post - what about hoe-ing in the veg patch?  Ok, I'm taking off the green top growth but am I just spreading the plant even further?
 
Leah Sattler
Posts: 2603
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I tried getting a few thistles thistles out of my yard (I also wanted to eliminate them for barefoot playing).  I initially tried the 'chop them off' method and they just reappeared in great numbers nearby. After a bit of asking around I was informed that they are rhizomatous and that when you chop the top off it just sends a rhizome off a ways to try somewhere else. this appeared to fit what I was seeing in my yard.....  chop one.....3 more appear a few feet away. It was suggested to me that when I find a thistle to dig the whole bugger out of the ground making sure to get every bit of root so there was nothing left. that is the only thing that worked for me.
 
paul wheaton
master steward
Posts: 20470
Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
bee chicken hugelkultur trees wofati woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
They give up in the end.

And I'll second:  goats and pigs will eat thistle.  I'm not sure about chickens.

And don't worry about the other weeds.  They are very easy to deal with.  Focus on bindweed and thistle.

Hoe-ing:  I haven't fired up a hoe since I was a kid.  If you use lots of mulch (and if you are not, we should talk) then very few weeds will pop up.  And most of those weeds will probably be beneficial to your garden and I would leave them.  But bindweed and thistle, I would pull.  And the pull easy in a well mulched garden.

As for Leah's method for digging it out:  When I pull from the garden, I usually get a fair bit of root too.  It just comes out when I pull.  But when I pull from the yard, I don't worry about the roots.



 
Alison Thomas
pollinator
Posts: 933
Location: France
9
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Ok I'll persevere.  There's someone in the background that wants wants to Glyphosate them 

The hoe-ing/mulch bit.  Well currently we don't have much to mulch with other than going out and buying stuff which is not where we want to be in this trying-to-be-as-self-sufficient-as-possible sort of situation.  We do have grass mowings but someone said they rob so much nitrogen out of the soil whilst they're breaking down that they're not such a great idea for the veg patch.  The soil is in crap condition anyway.  The old guy who lived in seemed keen on 'inputs' in the chemical form.  There's been none of those for 2 years now since we bought the place but it takes time to build up mulching materials.
 
jeremiah bailey
Posts: 343
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm under the impression that grass clippings return nitrogen back to the soil (and air) while breaking down. The problems lies in that they tend to mat down and inhibit the flow of water and oxygen into the soil. They also tend to get hot from decomp if layered too thickly. Another thing about using your grass clippings in your garden, is that you're robbing your lawn of mulch and nutrients. While I'll occasionally harvest some grass to heat up the compost pile, I do so sparingly and rotate the areas that I utilize for this. I have a patch of cowpea and buckwheat mixed. I plan on using the straw for mulch and reseeding with the harvested seeds. Another idea is planting a winter wheat in your veggie beds. Mow it down prior to planting your veggies in the spring. If you let it go to seed, you can thresh it and have seed for next year. Or you can just spend more money on new seed. I have a 1/4 acre lot, so I have room for several beds. I can grow a grain/legume mix in one during the summer and rotate through the beds each year. Over winter I'm going to try growing winter varieties and see how that works. I don't know how much room you have, so you may need to modify that a bit. You can use the remains of any of your garden plants as mulch. Just make sure that a particular plant doesn't have properties that hinder the growth of seed or plants. Hope it helps.
 
Alison Thomas
pollinator
Posts: 933
Location: France
9
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
That's brilliant info Jeremiah.  I was going to start doing some green manures this winter so that has just boosted my enthusiasm.
 
paul wheaton
master steward
Posts: 20470
Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
bee chicken hugelkultur trees wofati woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
heninfrance wrote:
Ok I'll persevere.  There's someone in the background that wants wants to Glyphosate them 



Glyphosate will not kill these two.    Since glyphosate is generally so effective at killing all vegetation, a beginner would think that glyphosate would work - but the trick that glyphosate does will kill the plant back a little - but not kill it outright.

The technique I have described will be more effective than glyphosate.



 
Joel Hollingsworth
pollinator
Posts: 2103
Location: Oakland, CA
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I wonder if it would do any good to drive a digging bar or similar into their rhizomes.  Even if it didn't completely kill the plant, it might be easier on the back than bending over.

Apparently, bindweed doesn't like acid soil (http://westernfarmpress.com/mag/farming_product_drops_ph/).  Has anyone tried using biodegradeable acid, like vinegar or lactic acid?  I bet the kids would enjoy pouring the hooch from sourdough starter on the plants to see what it does to them.  Might it be worthwhile to try soil-acidifying plants nearby, especially ones that exude natural herbicides?

Lastly, have you considered growing something like alder to enrich your garden soil and produce mulch?
 
Alison Thomas
pollinator
Posts: 933
Location: France
9
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
OK polyparadigm, enlighten me.  Alders? Do they enrich the soil just by being there?  Their mulch comes from coppicing

We have LOADS of laurels and they grow like stink - blasted things.  The annoying thing is that the laurel hedge has got lots of small trees in it - things like oak and hornbeam - and I'm wondering if their progress is being hampered by the laurel??
 
Joel Hollingsworth
pollinator
Posts: 2103
Location: Oakland, CA
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Alders are not legumes, but have evolved root nodules that function similarly, to host nitrogen-fixing bacteria (alders use Frankia, legumes use Rhizobia, among other differences).  These are big nodules, up to fist-sized, and keep exuding nitrogen long after the tree dies.

Like other pioneers, they produce lots of seeds and grow quickly; like other plants with unusual access to nitrogen, they are unusually careless about dropping nutrient-rich tissue.  The male catkins are reputedly edible (not palatable, but edible...) to humans, and high in protein; these fall off yearly, as do the leaves, so you would get mulch even if you didn't coppice or prune.  Birds and mice also eat their seeds, bringing more soil enrichment to the table.  It might make sense to coppice with an extractive mindset, killing them off gradually as the soil improves.

I didn't realize you already had "LOADS of laurels [that] grow like stink - blasted things".  That sounds like a ready source of mulch to me!  Especially if you think thinning them would help your oak and hornbeam trees.   My suggestion to plant more weedy woody things seems silly now.

Do you suppose the laurel branches in question are narrow enough to go on your garden beds directly, or would the thick stuff need to spend some time rotting on garden paths first?  I sometimes run a knife down a branch a few times before cutting it off, as a more ergonomical way of separating the fine mulch from the coarse mulch.  And as regards very coarse mulch, I'd suggest Paul's article on hugelkultur if you haven't read it already.
 
paul wheaton
master steward
Posts: 20470
Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
bee chicken hugelkultur trees wofati woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
polyparadigm wrote:
I wonder if it would do any good to drive a digging bar or similar into their rhizomes.  Even if it didn't completely kill the plant, it might be easier on the back than bending over.


Rhizomes are underground.  Hard to hit without being able to see them.  Plus, their rhizomes can run mighty deep.

Apparently, bindweed doesn't like acid soil


Bindweed runs rampant around here and the typical ph is less than 6! 




 
Joel Hollingsworth
pollinator
Posts: 2103
Location: Oakland, CA
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
paul wheaton wrote:

Bindweed runs rampant around here and the typical ph is less than 6!



Yowza.  The article I linked to doesn't say how far the pH was lowered, and it does talk about a bare patch afterward, so maybe it needs to be unreasonably low (I bet pH of 1 would do the trick!), or maybe acid just helps roundup to penetrate this particular plant.

Good to know, in any event.
 
Kathleen Sanderson
Posts: 985
Location: Near Klamath Falls, Oregon
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Vinegar will probably work to kill bindweed, as we use it for a weed-killer in the driveway (gravel driveway).  But in my experience, bindweed, once established, covers so much territory that you'd probably have to soak the entire yard to get rid of it (and then it would probably still come back in a year or so!).  Bindweed is a much worse pest than thistle, IMO, at least as far as gardening is concerned.  My goats will eat it, and so will the chickens, but only small quantities, so that's only a partial solution.  And we have an entire acre heavily infested with bindweed, so pulling it is going to be a very slow solution!

Kathleen
 
paul wheaton
master steward
Posts: 20470
Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
bee chicken hugelkultur trees wofati woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I suspect that vinegar might defoliate some of the bindweed, but it won't kill the whole plant. 

And while vinegar might work against most plants, I think for bindweed, pulling will be far more effective. 

And ... I would like to say that I think vinegar is something I would generally avoid.  It seems like it is a good stepping stone for folks to move away from glyphosate.  I think the next stepping stone is to keep in mind that pouring acid on your soil (which is what vinegar is) isn't really good for the rest of the soil organisms.  Better ways would be to plant things that would outcompete the problem plants - or bring in something that would graze the problem plants. 

 
nancy sutton
gardener
Posts: 626
Location: Federal Way, WA - Western Washington (Zone 8 - temperate maritime)
13
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Here's one person's solution, from GardenWeb, and using the devil glysophate ... but it an apparently very contained application.  I like the idea of a dilute solution being able to get the heart of the beast .-- (Nancy PNW)

•Posted by Bry84 England
Sun, Feb 13, 05 at 10:24

I had trouble with bindweed for years, the whole garden was infested with it and nothing would stop it. I pulled it out the first year, but a week later the stuff had grown several foot of new plant. I tried weed killer the next year which slowed it down somewhat, but only for a matter of two weeks rather than one... Gardening is close to impossible when it gets this well established, the massive root system of the plant goes about 15 foot deep and can throw out endless meters of plant growth all summer. I've seen it scale to the top of a 5 foot fence in just three days. Of all the weeds I've had in my garden, this one is the weed from Hell.
Well, I tried just about everything and looked in to how professional gardeners, farmers and various other industries dealt with the stuff. Disappointingly they accepted in most cases that it could never be fully eradicated. Not the news I wanted so I set out to find my own solution. The main problem with bindweed is the massive deep root network, so if you kill that the result should be good. Glyphosate weed killers (like roundup) are taken in to the roots of weeds and kill them, so I tried them first and discovered that they didn't have lasting effects on such a large plant. The quantity absorbed by the foliage isn't enough to kill the main root system, it's just too big, and increasing the concentration of glyphosate would cause the foliage to die faster and quickly cut off the absorption. What you need is slow poisoning, that way the plant and it's vast roots will absorb as much glyphosate as possible before it becomes terminal.

I collected the long strands of bindweed and wrapped them up in balls that I placed inside old jars and tin cans. These I filled with a glyphosate based weed killer, but I mixed it with about 1/3 more water than the instructions suggested, then I covered them over with plastic which I taped down firmly to keep animals and rain out. Do be aware that if these are knocked over and spilt on to plants you want they will die, so it's advisable to keep them at a distance and partly bury them in the ground for stability. It takes time, but I could clearly see the level in the containers reducing as the plant absorbed it. This seemed to work faster in the hot weather as the plant would be drawing more water, and also not removing the new bindweed shoots as they emerge since their growing is causing the plant to soak up more weedkiller, and also these shoots will be your next place to attach another can of solution when the old ones die off. For the first couple of months I saw no effect, although the bindweed had sucked in several pints of weed killer, but then it started to slow down, and after a while I noticed the new growth was an unhealthy yellow colour with holes in the misshapen leaves. About four months after starting this the main root system must have collapsed as the plant just withered away, even the bindweed across the road died (must have been one huge plant under the garden/road). It did continue to sprout the very occasional sickly yellow shoot, but a quick spray of weedkiller dealt with them nicely.

I dreaded the next year as I thought it would come back just as bad, but actually I only found three or four small clumps of bindweed and they were quickly eradicated with a few more pots of weed killer. The third year I found none. Of course seedlings will be a problem if you have neighbours with it in their garden, but they're a million times easier to deal with than the mature plant. More often than not I've just pulled them out and they never came back.

 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
Posts: 4434
Location: North Central Michigan
10
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
there is a really great tool called a weedhound that you might be able to locate and buy online..it has 4 nails sticking out of the bottom and you can use it to easily pull out any plant that has a taproot..like thistle, dandilion..etc.

it won't damage the rest of the property..and works like a charm..i love mine.

as for the bindweed..you gotta get ALL of the root..and really keep after it..it will come back from the slightests bit of root left in the soil
 
nancy sutton
gardener
Posts: 626
Location: Federal Way, WA - Western Washington (Zone 8 - temperate maritime)
13
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Unfortunately, my bindweed is in many beds, and even if digging deep enough to get every piece of root were feasible, it is coming in from privage property beyond my borders.  I'll continue to pry it up, but am going to try this technique, using the wads of roots to carry the diluted glysophate as far into the plant as possible.... maybe to crown of the plant?  I can dream!   But, I hope at least to knock it back farther and farther from year to year.

 
Jeff Hodgins
Posts: 193
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
paul wheaton wrote:
  Better ways would be to plant things that would outcompete the problem plants. 



I actually took some photos today to demonstrate how this works but it seems I'm too dumb to get them on here. The pictures show the effectivnes of garlic and curants as weed control in a large raspberry patch. Some areas growing with garlic are virtualy weed free and I havent pulled a weed or mulched in over 3 years.
 
Alison Thomas
pollinator
Posts: 933
Location: France
9
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
BDAFJeff wrote:
I actually took some photos today to demonstrate how this works but it seems I'm too dumb to get them on here. The pictures show the effectivnes of garlic and curants as weed control in a large raspberry patch. Some areas growing with garlic are virtualy weed free and I havent pulled a weed or mulched in over 3 years.

Ohhh how exciting, garlic as a weed deterrent.  Tell me more. 

And hey, I know what you mean about the photos - I've not had the time to learn how to do it either.
 
Leila Rich
steward
Posts: 3999
Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
88
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Jeff, do/did you have bindweed? It seems to be in a different catagory from 'normal' weeds, and the probably the only thing I'd poison.
My neighbours have it on the far side of their place and it makes me very nervous. I've asked if I may go over and poison it.
People think I'm nuts wanting to manage someone else's weeds, but the stuff has no respect for fences!
 
Kathleen Sanderson
Posts: 985
Location: Near Klamath Falls, Oregon
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm glad this thread got resurrected, because I hadn't seen the idea about putting the bindweed vines into pots of glyphosate!  That might POSSIBLY work!!!  It has been nearly impossible to garden here for the last few years because the bindweed has taken the garden area over.  I'm trying some earthboxes, but would sure like to have the use of the whole garden again (at least until this place sells!).

Kathleen
 
Jeff Hodgins
Posts: 193
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Leila wrote:
Jeff, do/did you have bindweed? It seems to be in a different catagory from 'normal' weeds, and the probably the only thing I'd poison.
My neighbours have it on the far side of their place and it makes me very nervous. I've asked if I may go over and poison it.
People think I'm nuts wanting to manage someone else's weeds, but the stuff has no respect for fences!

Yes I did have bind weed and I still do in paches but the paches with garlic have no weeds. Just raspberries and garlic. In the garden I'm talking about here I  curantly have currants, raspberries, chives, leeks, garlic, jeruselem artichoke, mint, potatos, rhubarb, comfrey and some annuals. The main problem is that there's a patch of this and a patch of that, what I need to do is mix it all up a bit more and then I'm sure my weed problem will be gone. What is a weed any way why can't scarlet runner beans be weeds they're just like bind weed only you can eat them. I plant alot of them in my raspberries they're the new bind weed if you ask me. Don't be afraid to work up a small patch but when you do don't just plant 1 plant, plant like 10 different ones. Here's what I do . I plant pots with anuals and perennials mixed up, so next year rather than having weeds where the annual was I have leeks or mint ect. Oh I almost forgot "Pig weed" (chenapodium) is easy to pull and you can eat it boiled or raw. I recomend letting it go to seed so that next year it will be the main weed. When its about a foot high you can pull up tons of it and eat it or just throw it right there not as good as no weeds but better than bindweed. IMO "chenopodium guasuntle" is'nt a weed at all it's one of my favorit crops as fodder and for people too. It also holds up beans.
 
Leila Rich
steward
Posts: 3999
Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
88
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Excuse me for hijacking Alison, but Jeff's bindweed experiences look really useful to me as well.
I've got tons of walking onions I could plant along my fence to try and put the bindweed off from coming under.
The area's already my permanent insect patch, and it would be great if it also acted as a bindweed barrier!
 
Jeff Hodgins
Posts: 193
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Onions are shade tolorent so if you put larger plants with onions under them the onions will get a head start on the larger plants in the spring. Onions alone will not compete with weeds, but if you plant a thickly spaced mixed pach of scarlet runner beans currants and onions or something along thoughs lines then you will have better weed control. 
 
Alison Thomas
pollinator
Posts: 933
Location: France
9
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
So the 'currants' bit is like red currant, black currant bushes etc?  And they are perennial.  Do the runner beans use the currants as frames?  If so, don't they swamp the currant bush?
 
Jeff Hodgins
Posts: 193
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Yes they will pull the branches down a bit but the currant will survive also when the currants are ripe the beans probably woult be too big yet. My gardens are not very asteticly pleasing, if that's what your trying to get at. Growing a garden like mine in the city is not likely to sit well with the "working class heros" next door, unless you have a tall fence.
 
Leila Rich
steward
Posts: 3999
Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
88
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
To me, 'swamp' refers to  plant 'b' overwhelming plant 'a' to plant 'a''s detriment.
I made the mistake of planting runner beans up a too-young plum tree. Seemed like a nice trellis at the time!
In the future, scrambling things will only get to scramble over relatively mature plants!
 
Lisa Allen
Posts: 223
Location: San Diego, CA USA
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Guess what Ayurvedic practitioner Todd Caldecott says about Bindweed (Convolvulus arvensis)??

In the "Himalayan" Tradition of Ayurveda, this is the plant that they also call Ashwagandha!!  If you look up this herb in Ayurvedic texts, you will discover it is an amazing healing herb!!  It is especially helpful for what Ayurveda calls "Vata" Dashas, and many who live in MT could suffer those conditions, since it is cold and dry here.  Use the ROOT medicinally.

http://www.toddcaldecott.com/index.php/herbs/learning-herbs/395-ashwagandha
 
Hugh Hawk
Posts: 225
Location: Adelaide, South Australia (Mediterranean climate)
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Anything to report back on your attempts, Nancy?

I am considering using glyphosate on my bindweed after a lot of reading about the alternatives.
 
                            
Posts: 79
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
if you have problems with thistle means usualy land is degraded by grazing of sheep and goats. with years they eat good plants and avoid bad, this helps plants like thistle to grow and spread without being bothered. i take them out with root whenever i see them. guess it works in the end.
for convolvulus - same case, its poisonous, animals avoid it, but i dont see it as problem, its not big plant and doesnt take much from soil. also covers soil so better this than nothing on top and soil goes dry in few days.
 
Kathleen Sanderson
Posts: 985
Location: Near Klamath Falls, Oregon
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
You know, I've heard before that bindweed is poisonous, but my goats like it, and I've never seen any sign of ill effects from them eating it?  They were starting to eat thistle, too, when I had to go back to dry-lotting because our other forage was gone. 

But as for bindweed being harmless in the garden, I disagree, at least here.  It's fairly harmless in the areas that I don't water, but any ground that gets watered gets absolutely drowned in bindweed.  It's hard to keep up with it (short kudzu, lol!).

Kathleen
 
                            
Posts: 79
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
goats can eat pretty much anything. plants that can easily kill us like belladona goats eat without problem.
thistle i didnt notice goats eat, probably they dont if they have enough of better food.
you can extinguish bindweed after harvest. cut off roots and cover with something like cardboard untill spring. after 2 or 3 years will probably work.
 
nancy sutton
gardener
Posts: 626
Location: Federal Way, WA - Western Washington (Zone 8 - temperate maritime)
13
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hugh, I'm busy right now putting bunches of bindweed strands in bottle of 3/4 strength Roundup.  I'll probably have a dozen or so bottles stuffed.  They are 12 to 16 oz  beverage bottles, and I'm figuring the top is small enough that I don't need to cover with plastic... although..?  I glue heavy wire to the side, so I can hook over a branch, or skewer into the ground, so they're secure, and spray paint orange so I don't lose or knock them over.

I'm doing it now because their white flowers are taunting me and supposedly fall is best time for RoundUp as plant is sending everything to it's roots in preparation for a spring takeover.  I don't see any immediate wilting in nearby vines (did I say it is everywhere?), but it has a 2 week effect lag when used full strength.

Reading over my original contribution, I'm thinking the amount of foliage submerged might be critical.

I've found cardboard is helpful only in encouraging the upper roots to run right below, and are easily pulled.... leaving the deep ones, however.

Holy cow...I'll have to check out the herbal link... I thought ashwagandha was a completely different plant.

I did run across a brief mention of a bindweed extract possibly having potential in cancer treatment... I posted a link... somewhere on this forum

Looking forward the convolvulus offensive next year....I think it will require persistence. 
 
Kathleen Sanderson
Posts: 985
Location: Near Klamath Falls, Oregon
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Bindweed in bottles of roundup sounds like a good idea, except that we have over an acre covered with the stuff.  That would take forever!

I'm HOPING that this place will sell, so someone else can deal with the bindweed.  Of course I'm sure our new home will have something to deal with, but doubt that it will be as persistent as bindweed!

Kathleen
 
ellen rosner
Posts: 135
3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Ashwagandha is not bindweed.

I have both in my garden. Unfortunately, the ashwagandha, while surviving, is not thriving.
Wish I could say the same about bindweed.

Here is a pic of ashwagandha
http://www.mskcc.org/mskcc/_assets/content-image/304764.gif

http://www.helpfulhealthtips.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/ashwagandha.jpg


astroherbalist wrote:
Guess what Ayurvedic practitioner Todd Caldecott says about Bindweed (Convolvulus arvensis)??

In the "Himalayan" Tradition of Ayurveda, this is the plant that they also call Ashwagandha!!  If you look up this herb in Ayurvedic texts, you will discover it is an amazing healing herb!!  It is especially helpful for what Ayurveda calls "Vata" Dashas, and many who live in MT could suffer those conditions, since it is cold and dry here.  Use the ROOT medicinally.

http://www.toddcaldecott.com/index.php/herbs/learning-herbs/395-ashwagandha
 
Lisa Allen
Posts: 223
Location: San Diego, CA USA
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
You are right, they are different plants.  Field Bindweed is the Ashwaganda of the Himalayan tradition of Ayurveda, not the usual (Southern India) tradition.  I am sorry that wasn't clear from either my post or from Todd Caldecott's website entry on this topic.
 
Hugh Hawk
Posts: 225
Location: Adelaide, South Australia (Mediterranean climate)
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Maybe those who think bindweed is not that bad have a different variety to me, or else different conditions where it does not thrive.  Unfortunately here it strangles every other plant, and even if you pull it all out, it will be doing the same thing by the next week, and this seems to do nothing to set the plant back.

Kathleen: I think the received wisdom is that your field of bindweed is probably only a few separate plants or even just one big interlinked plant.  Anecdotal reports say that getting glyphosate into the root system generally takes out the whole thing in one go, some even say that the bindweed across the street died as well.

Nancy: Thanks for the update.  I am about to start this process.  Wish me luck!!
 
2017 Permaculture Design Course at Wheaton Labs
http://richsoil.com/pdc
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!