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Cutting wood

 
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Location: Milwaukee, Wisconsin
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 I am never sure where too post my questions.

But  I am trying too make a cold frame.     I  live in a Urban setting.  So not trying to build an entire log cabin from scratch.  
What  tools would you suggest I use to be able to cut the wood  to the correct length  as wel  as to be able to cut the wood at the right angles.  
Most of the wood I am using is Pallet wood.  

currently the only power tool that I have is a Jig-Saw and a Drill.    I am new to this so not looking to use anything that is very complicated.  

Thank you
 
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Hi Marc,
I would say the simplest thing is to use what you have. A jigsaw can work. The lines might not be perfect and it will take a little while, but you could do it.

To step it up, I would highly suggest a miter saw (the electric ones are more commonly called a chop saw). You can buy a manual miter saw. Which is just a hand saw with a frame where you can line up for different angles. The electric miter saw cuts much faster and easier, but are heavier to move around and obviously you have to have an extension cord or plug. Those are made for exactly what you are talking about. Cutting boards straight or at angles.

Don't forget that the plants won't care how it looks :) Good luck with your project!

**edit, just fixed a typo
 
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Something like this: https://www.dewalt.com/product/dcs781x1/dewalt-60v-max-brushless-12in-double-bevel-sliding-miter-saw will do what you need and be helpful for many more projects over the saw's lifetime, without taking up too much space. You can find a similar tool in whatever brand you prefer.
 
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You could absolutely do this using just a handsaw, hammer and nails. Angled cuts can have some advantages, but for something as simple and utilitarian as a cold frame it is probably overkill.
 
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I'd use a hand saw or jig saw for the first project.  Upgrade to a chop saw if you think you'll do more woodworking.

Be wary of nails in the pallet wood.  Hitting a nail with a saw will dull it significantly.  So either get all the nails out first, or be careful that for every cut you check both sides of the board to make sure you won't hit a nail.
 
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Hi,  Welcome to woodcutting.  Thoughts from an old timer. Starting in life, learning new ways of doing things, and aquiring tools to help get tasks done is exciting, fun, and dauntig.  My advice is to look to the future when aquiring tools.  

The saws I have used most in life for projects:

1. A circular saw with a speed square (also known as a skill saw). The square is used as a guide and the cut is straight on the board no matter what angle.  I also use clamps to hold the board in place. (as a side note you can cut right on the pallet and not have to take it apart. Less work and more time for something else.) This has been my go to saw for many projects.

2. A compound miter saw.  Mostly I use it as a chop saw, but there are times that the compound bevel and angle cut in one step has been a life saver. If buying an electric miter saw, go for the coumpound option with it for future needs.

3. A hand miter saw used mostly for 1 or 2 pieces of wood. Simple, quick and lightweight.

4. A Sawzall. Like a big jigsaw. I used it mostly for destruction at first but learned to make decent cuts for construction. Can be used on metal and wood.

5. For ripping wood in the field I made a jig and used a circular saw. In the shop the table saw.

You will need sawhorses and sturdy 2x4 flat boards to make a movable workbench which can be made from pallets.

Have fun with the project.
 
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Arthur Angaran wrote:4. A Sawzall. Like a big jigsaw. I used it mostly for destruction at first but learned to make decent cuts for construction. Can be used on metal and wood.


I have one, but I’ve found that I mostly use a little oscillating saw where someone might normally use the sawzall. Do you use one of those?
 
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