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Endurance is to Contentment as Enjoyment is to Happiness

 
Posts: 8
Location: Unorganized Territories Maine
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    Having read MUCH of the content on the singles forum, I felt strongly compelled to introduce myself to such a wonderful, genuine following.
I am 46 years old, 5'7, and 140 pounds. A full head of fairly long red hair, and an even longer full, red beard. I have lived alone in the woods for 12 years after I walked away from my "destination job" as a City Forester and society at large when I became hopeless after realizing that I would not be able to change the world by bringing people back to the "natural order of things". So, I did what Ghandi proposed...I became the change I sought.  
    I live full time camp life alone on a ridgetop in Maine amongst a group of "townships" or officially recognized as "Unorganized Territories".  There are no red lights, no stop signs, no trash-pickup, no police department, no emergency services no mail delivery, and nothing more than a two mile 4-wheeler two-track to be able to get from my dwelling to the valley. It stands to reason that there is no running water nor electricity either. When I get snowed in, I am in until all of the snow melts and "mud season" ends. I am the only full-time human inhabitant for miles during winter and it is not uncommon for me to spend three to four months at a stretch without laying eyes on another human. I do mechanical, electrical, solar, equipment maintenance, carpentry, and am an all around problem solver. Strong in science, math, observation, and logic, I have a B.S. Degree in Agricultural Science and an Engineering background. On my mandatory fun days, I like to fish, track animals, and ride good ole Gracie, my Harley.
    In conclusion, again, I hope to be welcomed into this fine gathering of quality individuals. And in an attempt to barter a place by the fire, I would like to leave you with a theory of mine that may be of some use:

Endurance is to Contentment as Enjoyment is to Happiness
 
master pollinator
Posts: 1045
Location: Wheaton Labs, Montana, USA
1704
9
home care trees books wofati food preservation bike bee building writing seed
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A welcome and a hearty high-five to you, Schon.
 
Schon Vida
Posts: 8
Location: Unorganized Territories Maine
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Thank you so much, kind Sir. I appreciate you. I miserably failed numerous times in attempts to include the rest of what I had written which is now my "biography" should any interest arise. The fire here is wonderful. Allow me to build the next.
 
Schon Vida
Posts: 8
Location: Unorganized Territories Maine
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Hi, Fellow Permies!

    Recently, while on a diligent and dedicated search for the existence of "like minds", I stumbled upon this site and was immediately and irretrievably smitten by all of the people and the writings of everyone. While reading many of the singles adds themselves and learning that, indeed there are more people similar to myself, it was the additional, seemingly unrelated threads that left the most striking and indelible impression upon me. Whether it was the discussions pertaining to "break-ups" or more complicated issues concerning personal mistakes and individual admissions, the caliber of folks on this site is second to none. Real people. Real issues. Real dreams. Real failures. Real life. On a complex level, each person here is clearly very intelligent, yet we are all so simple. During more than a few interactive threads, some openly and clearly stated their disagreements with a previous poster yet tactfully, thoughtfully, and kindly explained their alternative stances on the subject. THIS IS UNHEARD OF IN THE WORLD IN WHICH WE NOW LIVE! The end result was consistent: either a new light was shed and all walked away with a different perspective or "agree to disagree" without insults or disrespect intended or implied. Each case or point was well written (also very rare) where punctuation, grammar, and complete sentences are commonplace here. Let me guess...it is likely that many of us still actively hand-write things in cursive. (I do.) This site is now my home; its staff and contributors my tribe.

This is th remaining portion which began at the top but contained to many characters originally.
 
rocket scientist
Posts: 5933
Location: latitude 47 N.W. montana zone 6A
2882
cat pig rocket stoves
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Hi Schon;
Welcome to Permies!
Are you familiar with rocket Mass heaters yet???
Perhaps you have built one?
Or perhaps you would like to learn about them and maybe build one yourself?
We would love to teach you how to stay warm longer using less wood.
If so, you have come to the right place!
 
Schon Vida
Posts: 8
Location: Unorganized Territories Maine
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Thank you for your acceptance as well, Mr. Rubino. While I have a "working knowledge" and understanding of rocket mass heaters, their efficiency when properly constructed, and how they relate to radiant heat based on thermal mass properties, alas, I have no experience in building one myself. Working knowledge never replaces experience. I welcome any and all correspondence on rocket heaters or anything else you or anyone else is willing to offer. We are all in this together. I am so thankful to be here and to have found this place.
 
Schon Vida
Posts: 8
Location: Unorganized Territories Maine
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As any Permie or off-gridder can attest, the first year in a new state, climate, or lifestyle is most certainly the hardest. Should one adapt quickly enough using a basic skillset and survive the first year, the chosen situation will only get easier…or such was my belief. In many cases, depending on the situation, this proved to be worth its salt indeed. I refer to the “Survival 5”: food, fire, water, shelter, and companionship. Of course these should be rearranged based on the previous factors aforementioned. But the first year…the first year is finding oneself as it relates to dealing with sometimes extreme discomfort whether it be environmental pressures, physical pain, loneliness, etc. I believed that I was certainly capable. What I did not and could not have known at the time, the hardships I would face, the problems I would encounter, nor the Endurance I would have to muster to complete the task at hand with my mantra always being “If I fail, it won’t be for lack of trying.”. As for the Survival 5, taking them in written order, my decision to leave society and walk into the woods initially left me hungry and dreaming of food, cold without the available resources to build a fire, a thirst so strong that when I finally did get a clean drink of water, I vomited it up, having to cut my way out of a tent  that collapsed during an ice storm (my only shelter at the time), and with my Great Pyrenees, Bene, for companionship. But that was in the beginning.
    Endurance is the ability to withstand the discomfort that is an absolute and total reality where one asks themselves very serious and desperately honest questions such as, “What the hell am I going to do now?”, and “Have I just made my final mistake?”. Endurance could theoretically be partly defined as “winning by attrition”. Simply outlast Goliath, some may say. But this is only part of the answer. One must DO SOMETHING about the situation. This is Endurance.

    As the first few years ground abrasively along, I had solved the clean water issue, built an 8’x16’ lean-to from pallets and scrounged materials (it had a dirt floor), put an old, rusty wood stove back to work, had a comfortable stack of dry firewood on hand, and was eating small animals I had trapped as well as frozen road-kill during the winter. A daily, beneficial routine had developed, I embraced the idea that I had made the right decision to leave my profession/society, and traveled a bit lighter upon the Earth feeling that I was now in charge (within reason) of my life. I learned at that time that in this chosen lifestyle, I get back only what I put in, every calorie of my life energy is being spent directly for my benefit, and, most certainly, that there are no “freebies”. I remember vividly eating a full belly of road-kill deer for supper, feeding the gleanings to my companion, water and coffee grounds on hand for coffee the next morning, and watching “caveman tv” with the stove door open while the ambient light and audible purr of the Coleman lantern lit up the shack. This, to me was Contentment.
(PLEASE NOTE!: The shack was VERY drafty. Burning white gas or Coleman fuel in an enclosed space is lethal! You will die!)  
   
    This is the first half of the equation.
 
Schon Vida
Posts: 8
Location: Unorganized Territories Maine
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I am still young enough, strong enough, ambitious enough, green enough, stubborn enough, and most importantly ignorant enough to understand that what I am attempting is impossible.
 
Schon Vida
Posts: 8
Location: Unorganized Territories Maine
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Stupidity is placing one's hand on an anvil and striking the hand violently with a heavy hammer having never imagined the outcome. Ignorance is taking a leap of faith into the unknown.
 
Posts: 37
Location: Portugal
2
chicken bee solar
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Schon Vida wrote:As any Permie or off-gridder can attest, the first year in a new state, climate, or lifestyle is most certainly the hardest. Should one adapt quickly enough using a basic skillset and survive the first year, the chosen situation will only get easier…or such was my belief. In many cases, depending on the situation, this proved to be worth its salt indeed. I refer to the “Survival 5”: food, fire, water, shelter, and companionship. Of course these should be rearranged based on the previous factors aforementioned. But the first year…the first year is finding oneself as it relates to dealing with sometimes extreme discomfort whether it be environmental pressures, physical pain, loneliness, etc. I believed that I was certainly capable. What I did not and could not have known at the time, the hardships I would face, the problems I would encounter, nor the Endurance I would have to muster to complete the task at hand with my mantra always being “If I fail, it won’t be for lack of trying.”. As for the Survival 5, taking them in written order, my decision to leave society and walk into the woods initially left me hungry and dreaming of food, cold without the available resources to build a fire, a thirst so strong that when I finally did get a clean drink of water, I vomited it up, having to cut my way out of a tent  that collapsed during an ice storm (my only shelter at the time), and with my Great Pyrenees, Bene, for companionship. But that was in the beginning.
    Endurance is the ability to withstand the discomfort that is an absolute and total reality where one asks themselves very serious and desperately honest questions such as, “What the hell am I going to do now?”, and “Have I just made my final mistake?”. Endurance could theoretically be partly defined as “winning by attrition”. Simply outlast Goliath, some may say. But this is only part of the answer. One must DO SOMETHING about the situation. This is Endurance.

    As the first few years ground abrasively along, I had solved the clean water issue, built an 8’x16’ lean-to from pallets and scrounged materials (it had a dirt floor), put an old, rusty wood stove back to work, had a comfortable stack of dry firewood on hand, and was eating small animals I had trapped as well as frozen road-kill during the winter. A daily, beneficial routine had developed, I embraced the idea that I had made the right decision to leave my profession/society, and traveled a bit lighter upon the Earth feeling that I was now in charge (within reason) of my life. I learned at that time that in this chosen lifestyle, I get back only what I put in, every calorie of my life energy is being spent directly for my benefit, and, most certainly, that there are no “freebies”. I remember vividly eating a full belly of road-kill deer for supper, feeding the gleanings to my companion, water and coffee grounds on hand for coffee the next morning, and watching “caveman tv” with the stove door open while the ambient light and audible purr of the Coleman lantern lit up the shack. This, to me was Contentment.
(PLEASE NOTE!: The shack was VERY drafty. Burning white gas or Coleman fuel in an enclosed space

Hi Schon,
Funny enough i was watching this lady in the UK the other day who seems to have a very similar lifestyle to yours (minus the crazy freezing temperatures of Maine I would say)
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=U-7O-fIYSsY&pp=ygUqbGl2ZXMgaW4gYSB5dXJ0IG5vIHdhdGVyIG9yIGVsZWN0cmljaXR5IHVr

I too live offgrid but do like a little electricity at least to charge my phone and computer.
3 months without seeing a soul must be tough yet you sound at peace and content. Your story about your begginings offgrid sounded like the script of a movie.... scary to have your tent collapse under the snow with no help at sight, you do seem like a true offgrider😊
Wishing you the best of luck🙏
Elia

 
I'm gonna make him a tiny ad he can't refuse!
Posting private singles listings
https://permies.com/t/154253/Posting-private-singles-listings
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