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Welcome Jason Akers author of Hunt Gather Grow Eat

 
steward
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Photo Source: Jason Akers

This week Jason Akers will be joining us to talk about hunting, gathering, growing, and eating.

There are four copies of his book, Hunt Gather Grow Eat up for grabs.

Jason will be stopping by on the forum over the next few days answering questions and joining in discussions.

From now through this Friday, any posts in this forum, ie hunting and fishing forum, could be selected to win.

To win, you must use a name that follows our naming policy and you must have your email set up in Paul's Daily-ish email.

The winner will be notified by email and must respond within 24 hours.

Posts in this thread won't count, but please feel free to say hi to Jason and make him feel welcome!
 
steward
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Hi Jason, thanks for giving us some of your time! When I was in Wisconsin I was working up my nerve to learn deer hunting. Now that I'm in Oregon, I'm thinking salmon are the thing to pursue. Oh, and I dearly want to learn to forage for mushrooms.
 
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Hello Jason,
What are your recommendations for rifles? Please suggest a .22, and for larger game such as deer, please suggest a good all around rifle. In my years hunting I think I have narrowed it down to what I like. But it would be interesting to see what your preferences are.
Also, have you ever used the native american fish trap? The one where you place sticks in the mud near the bank of a river or pond in the shape of an "M"? I've been wanting to try this, I am curious if you ever had. Thanks
 
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Julia - thanks for the welcome. I'm jealous that you guys have salmon. But hey at least we have big southern catfish!

Ray - I like my Ruger 10/22. But then again most .22's including Rugers, Marlins and Winchesters are all good guns. For deer I like my .308. I bought this gun (Savage) in 2009 with a scope already mounted and boresighted. I didn't get to put but one or two rounds through it. Took it out the first day and its been killing deer ever since. I've taken 4 deer with it with 4 shots. They never took more than two steps after a shot. I shot a .270 in my teen years and right up until I bought the .308. I'll never use anything other than a .308 now. That gun is so light and easy to handle and the recoil is almost non-existent. I've never tried that fish trap but I'm familiar with how it works. I'm a big fan of trotlines and I have blocked off smaller tributaries of creeks to gig gar and other fish.
 
Ray Cecil
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Jason Akers wrote:Julia - thanks for the welcome. I'm jealous that you guys have salmon. But hey at least we have big southern catfish!

Ray - I like my Ruger 10/22. But then again most .22's including Rugers, Marlins and Winchesters are all good guns. For deer I like my .308. I bought this gun (Savage) in 2009 with a scope already mounted and boresighted. I didn't get to put but one or two rounds through it. Took it out the first day and its been killing deer ever since. I've taken 4 deer with it with 4 shots. They never took more than two steps after a shot. I shot a .270 in my teen years and right up until I bought the .308. I'll never use anything other than a .308 now. That gun is so light and easy to handle and the recoil is almost non-existent. I've never tried that fish trap but I'm familiar with how it works. I'm a big fan of trotlines and I have blocked off smaller tributaries of creeks to gig gar and other fish.



Jason, thanks for the input. I haven't done a huge amount of hunting, but enough to have become decent at it. What I have figured out about guns is that its totally subjective. Just like cars. Everyone has their own taste. The Ruger 10/22 is great. You cannot go wrong with that. I've shot .270 through a Marlin MR-7 for years and love the gun. Recoils like a SOB but hey, it should be only one shot anyways right? I had a brief stint working for Remington Arms until they decided to move their R&D facility out of Kentucky, that's when I found another job. I didn't want to move to Alabama. I have a Marlin 336SS in 30-30 that I absolutely love. As far as pistols go I only shoot 1911's (I worked in Remington's hand gun R&D group). And before you ask, NO, I had nothing to do with the R-51 or its failure. lol. I didn't like that gun from the get-go. You'll be pleased to know there are some other handguns coming out that I believe will compete well in the market. But....i've said too much already....wink wink.

Anyway, I am visiting Salamander Springs Farm near Berea KY next month. And we are camping out. So if I have the chance to build a Native American Fish Trap I will do so and report back!!

Thanks for your input Jason.
 
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Hi Jason! I used to dissect flies for my job and I had the opportunity to listen to your podcast all the time. I absolutely LOVED it! It was focused and to the point and had tons of topics I was interested in. We lived in a 3-bedroom condo at the time so It was a great time for me to live vicariously through your experiences. Thank you for that. I bought your book "The Scrounged Homestead," and it had TONS of useful information when I built the garden at my mom's house. Thank you for all your hard work and I can't wait to see what amazing things you are doing next!
Jaye Anne
 
Jason Akers
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Jaye Ann - That might be the strangest and coolest thing anyone's ever done while listening to me talk! LOL

I'm glad you found the Scrounged Homestead helpful. Thanks for saying hi!

Jason
 
Jason Akers
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Ray

I totally agree about guns being subjective. I was really married to the .270 for a long time. Its a good gun but unfortunately I had too many deer run even with heart shots. Yes I couldn't believe it either. No heart left in the deer and it still ran. Strange. But my dad loves the gun, has even killed elk with it.

I nearly went to work with Remington in Western Kentucky. They make good guns.

My brother had that exact gun and loved it. Of course he shot it like he was in the wild west and pumped the lever as fast as he could.

Yes let me know about the trap, I'd be interested in trying it.

Jason
 
Ray Cecil
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Jason Akers wrote:Ray

I totally agree about guns being subjective. I was really married to the .270 for a long time. Its a good gun but unfortunately I had too many deer run even with heart shots. Yes I couldn't believe it either. No heart left in the deer and it still ran. Strange. But my dad loves the gun, has even killed elk with it.

I nearly went to work with Remington in Western Kentucky. They make good guns.

My brother had that exact gun and loved it. Of course he shot it like he was in the wild west and pumped the lever as fast as he could.

Yes let me know about the trap, I'd be interested in trying it.

Jason



Jason, I didn't realize till just now you live in KY. Have you heard of the Salamander Springs Farm in Berea? Susana, the lady who runs the show, puts on permaculture workshops, and 2 hour tours. The tours are the 2nd saturday of each month. My wife and I are headed over there next month. We are busy saving and planning for our permaculture business. We hope to learn a few things from Salamander Springs. We're taking the conversion camper van and staying in some cool places in Daniel Boone for a night or two that weekend. (October 11th and 12th).

We are looking at land around campbellsville to Bardstown area. The area around KY lake is nice too. I did a lot of boyscout stuff down there growing up.
 
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I can't believe I've missed out on your input. I'm after your podcasts now and you should edit your signature to include your website http://theselfsufficientgardener.com/ and anyother websites you have or promote, maybe a page on your website directing us to all of your books?

Paul, links to podcasts with Jason would be useful too!

Edit: Nice chanterelles btw, even I can pick those out as blind as I am. I didn't think they wanted to grow that large out east, it's a common size in the Northwest if we're patient
 
Jason Akers
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Ray

I've lived or worked at just about every part of the state. LOL

We used to live in Lexington so my wife would go craft shopping in Berea but I've only passed through on my way to other places. I hear that Salamander springs is nice.

The Bardstown area is nice. We used to also live in Bullitt County and I worked in Bardstown. If you did scouting at KY lake then you probably know Camp Roy C Manchester? That's where I'm taking my son later this month.

I'll keep an eye here for your report on Berea.

Jason
 
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Rick

Yes I need to do that. I had three podcasts at one time.

www.theselfsufficientgardener.com
www.huntgathergroweat.com

I've haven't been active in a while though. There is a conspicuous link on the LH side at www.theselfsufficientgardener.com that takes you to the Amazon page for my books. I have three (Hunt Gather Grow Eat, The Scrounged Homestead and Gardening With Insects).

I just had an article on Chanterelles in BackHome Magazine. They get pretty big here and grow in big patches. The funny thing is that unless its a morel most people around here won't mess with mushrooms. But I've found Chanterelles (normal and cinnabar), honey mushrooms, lion's manes and reishi. And I grow Shiitake, reishi and lion's manes. I've never found a morel here. LOL
 
Ray Cecil
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Jason Akers wrote:Ray

I've lived or worked at just about every part of the state. LOL

We used to live in Lexington so my wife would go craft shopping in Berea but I've only passed through on my way to other places. I hear that Salamander springs is nice.

The Bardstown area is nice. We used to also live in Bullitt County and I worked in Bardstown. If you did scouting at KY lake then you probably know Camp Roy C Manchester? That's where I'm taking my son later this month.

I'll keep an eye here for your report on Berea.

Jason



Jason, I live in Bullitt County, in Mt Washington. Yes I am familiar with that camp also.
 
Rick Howd
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Jason Akers wrote:Rick

Yes I need to do that.


I want to log into your computer and do it for you. Go to My Profile |General Information about yourself | Signature and include your links, please! you deserve it.
 
gardener
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Hey Jason. I am happy and surprised to see you here, I am another person who listened to all of your podcasts and materials back at one of my previous jobs as a bike builder. All day long I would listen to yours and other podcasts and I enjoyed your style, opinions, and topics. Good work! Hope you can find a way to share your stuff in the future.
 
Jason Akers
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Thanks Rick!

 
Jason Akers
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Ray

Its a small world indeed. Your name sounds familiar.

Jason
 
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Zach

Thanks for listening! Podcasting got frustrating after a while so I decided my best method for communication was books and articles. Maybe someday!

Jason
 
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I am also a Bullitt County resident! Jason I have been looking into getting a bow. I see a lot of compound bows on craigslist but recurve/long bows seem simpler and less maintenance but may require more skill to become competent. What you would you recommend for small game and deer hunting?
 
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Shane

Ok that is blowing my mind a little bit. Its clear that Paul and Permies' reach is pretty wide.

I wouldn't say that recurves and long bows require less maintenance. Compound bows are complex machines but they are still pretty worry free. Using a bow for any small game is a hell of a challenge though. I used to kick an old basketball and shoot at it with the recurve. Its tough. Some recurves and longbows don't even have a place to mount sights so you end up shooting instinctively or sighting down the arrow. Again - very tough. Personally I'd start with a compound (Bear, PSE or any decent known brand) at the 55 pound draw range or above (up to what you can handle comfortably). If you go to any decent bow shop they can set you up pretty well with draw weight and length. Its cheaper on Craiglist but without taking all the measurements first you might be guessing to get what you need. And the great thing is you have BassProShops just across the river!

Jason
 
Ray Cecil
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Jason Akers wrote:Ray

Its a small world indeed. Your name sounds familiar.

Jason



Hmmm...well maybe we have crossed paths. I've known a lot of Jasons....did you ever spend much time in Mt. Washington? Did you go to school at bullitt east or bullitt central? I played basketball, tennis, track, and cross country in high school. I grew up in church but no longer care for it, maybe we crossed paths there?

I did know a Jason in boyscouts who was a couple years older than me. You didn't belong to troop 333 did you? Jimmy Sartin's troop? That would be unbelievable if you are that Jason.
 
Jason Akers
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Ray

We never spent much time in Mt. Washington. I lived in Lebanon Junction, Shepherdsville and Cedar Grove. I went to Bullitt Central. I played basketball and played in Mt. Washington on occasion.

I was in scouts but in LJ. That name and troop doesn't sound familiar though.

Jason
 
Ray Cecil
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Jason Akers wrote:Ray

We never spent much time in Mt. Washington. I lived in Lebanon Junction, Shepherdsville and Cedar Grove. I went to Bullitt Central. I played basketball and played in Mt. Washington on occasion.

I was in scouts but in LJ. That name and troop doesn't sound familiar though.

Jason



The Jason I knew also lived in LJ and had a buddy in scouts named Donny.

I graduated from Bullitt East in 2004. So maybe we played ball together. Or had some boy scout troop stuff we did together back in the day.
 
steward
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So I ran the winner picker app in the forum software and we have 2 winners.

Matthew Nistico
and
Mat Smith

Congratulations Matthew and Mat!

I sent you an email to ask for the email address of the person that first referred you to Permies.com. That person (if qualified) will also get a copy of the book and a permies care package.
 
Jason Akers
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Congrats!
 
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Woohoo! Stoked about that
If it gets here in time I can take it and read it on my honeymoon!!

Appreciate your time here Jason in answering everyone's questions, but more importantly I believe is the interest and discussions that you have promoted.
 
Jason Akers
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Thanks Mat and everyone!

I had a ton of fun!

Jason
 
I can't renounce my name. It's on all my stationery! And hinted in this tiny ad:
Switching from electric heat to a rocket mass heater reduces your carbon footprint as much as parking 7 cars
http://woodheat.net
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