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WyOasis (in the snow) Greenhouse Build

 
Posts: 8
Location: Western Montana, zone 6a
hugelkultur bee homestead
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So your tomatoes are going to be growing as perennials?  
 
Posts: 47
Location: USDA Zone 3-4/Sunset Zone 1a/in South Central WY
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That's the plan. I've pruned them hard and they've started to grow again. Hopefully, they'll produce as well as they did this last summer.
 
Posts: 1181
Location: Central Wyoming -zone 4
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So fun for me to watch more people start to come Into the permaculture world, how has the greenhouse been for you now that you've had it a while? With any build there is usually things that we wish we'd done different, what's the biggest "mistake" you felt like you made?

Also is miles going up there and helping you out or yall just friends over the web?
 
pollinator
Posts: 4715
Location: Zones 2-4 Wyoming and 4-5 Colorado
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hugelkultur forest garden fungi books bee greening the desert
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Devon, We are related so I get to visit and help out when I have time off. Might be a bit tougher this year as I took a new job with less days off.  Kani says they ate one of the oranges the other day and are waiting for the rest to ripen up ! If you get a chance you should contact them for a tour and check it out. You are not that far away.
 
Devon Olsen
Posts: 1181
Location: Central Wyoming -zone 4
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I would love to come visit! I'm thinking a podcast episode would be great also!
 
pollinator
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I would also love to hear every detail on what you have learned from this process.  What, if anything, you wish you had done differently.  What works better than expected and what is lacking.

I wrote awhile ago asking if you knew about the Climate Battery design used where the tubes remain under the footprint of the greenhouse to 'charge' the earth underneath with warmth during the day.  This is a different design but from what you've learned how do you think it would compare?

I ultimately want to understand which designs work best.  I've even heard of someone using an old radiator as a heat exchanger with water running through it (along with a fan) and into barrels or an IBC tote.  There are also solar evacuated tubes that could be used to heat water storage tanks.  And I've seen the use of phase change materials to store and release heat.

I'm at 5b at 7500' and really want something that works for me, but I couldn't afford to do it twice if the first build isn't up to standards.
 
pollinator
Posts: 166
Location: Southeast corner of Wyoming
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Sitting in Cheyenne looking at our record breaking snow and wondering how much yall got from this storm...  Or were you north and west of most of it?   I was wondering how the greenhouse handled it.  And of course yall just trying to get to it.
 
Kani Seifert
Posts: 47
Location: USDA Zone 3-4/Sunset Zone 1a/in South Central WY
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Sorry I didn't reply sooner, somehow I didn't get a message that folks had been asking questions.

Devon, just give us a holler to come and visit.

Seth, we do have 1 battery bank tube through the center which we hook up in the fall. It has kept the ground fairly warm. The citrus and avocados are thriving. In looking at our recording thermometer, we did have a week of cloudy days in January and the temp inside dipped to 32F for about 15 minutes. The lime and large avocado near the windows suffered slightly, but they are springing back. The tomatoes on that end also bit the dust, although the peppers are fine. Were we to do it again, we'd use more tubes and place some coming into the middle as well as the end. The blower is placed to blow the air, but it doesn't push enough through the tubes, so I'd also place a "sucker" blower at the incoming ends to help move the air more. Also, we'd place the blower on the east end if we were going to have windows. I'm not sure they are really needed. It's nice in the summer to open the greenhouse, but when we started leaving it closed, the temps regulated themselves somewhat. The biggest problem we've had (besides some bugs) is keeping it cool in the greenhouse. Even in the wintertime the temps can get high if it is sunny outside. We are in Zone 4 and the greenhouse works great. I think it is due to the walipini effect of being 4' below grade. This design would work well at 7500' as it provides so much protection from the elements.

The peaches and plums we planted in the vestibule have all bloomed and leafed out. I hand pollinated, but am not really expecting fruit this year as we don't have any pollinators yet. We had problems last year with aphids and the dreaded red spider mite! This company doesn't sponsor me, but I have to share them - Arbico Organics has saved the day. We got 10,000 ladybugs that arrived ALIVE! No more aphids, and we haven't seen any this spring either. Also, I ordered mite predators. Assassin bugs and some other crawlies took care of the problem. I'm amazed. And we didn't have to spray at all. I think we might have a mouse. As soon as the strawberries get some red, they get chewed. Dang cat is slacking.

Dorothy, we've had a low snow year. It has all evaporated and/or melted and we are already dry. Dang it. If it is going to be cold and windy, we should at least get some moisture along with it. We've been sitting in the below 10% humidity, with most days in the 1-5% range. Being in Cheyenne, you should be one zone warmer and will be able to grow more plants than we can. There is a permaculture group in Laramie County with some really nice folks.
 
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Kani Seifert wrote:
The citrus and avocados are exceeding expectations. One of the avocados is blooming. I don't know if we'll get fruit, but I'm amazed at their growth. We have oranges and lemons on some of the trees already. We're so happy with their vigor.



Avocado looks like it is lacking Magnesium or iron, which might also be due to too high a Ph (just check that it's below 6.5). Same with all citrus, they can't uptake nutrients above 6.5 Ph, but those appear to look great.

Anyway, I am curious how you join the back roof with the front glazing. What sort of roof ridge is there that works for joining these 2 different materials, and confidently sealing that seam?  Got any pics?
 
Miles Flansburg
pollinator
Posts: 4715
Location: Zones 2-4 Wyoming and 4-5 Colorado
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Howdy David, It is sort of hard to see but in some of the pictures you can see that Lyle bent strips of the blue siding material into an L shape and then ran those pieces all along the ridge where the Lexan and back wall come together. Everything is screwed together. Then on the inside you can see that they used spray foam to insulate the back wall and that also sealed the ridge from the inside.
 
Kani Seifert
Posts: 47
Location: USDA Zone 3-4/Sunset Zone 1a/in South Central WY
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Thank you for all the interest in our progress and greenhouse. We have some news. We will be selling our WyOasis property at auction on Saturday, August 21st. We would love to see the property go to a permaculturist.

The house sits on 8.68 fully-fenced acres on the edge of Medicine Bow, WY. It has a large shop with cement floor, a 30'x90' barn, divided into 3rds. The front 3rd has a cement floor. There is a small garden shed. The chicken coop is a 20'x11' room and an adjoining tack/grain room next to it.

The house has 5 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms with a finished basement and large pantry. The basement includes a canning kitchen, 2 bedrooms, bathroom, media room area, and office/library area. Upstairs, there is an attached 2 car garage, bathroom, mud room, newly remodeled kitchen, living/dining room, 3 bedrooms, and a screened porch/sunroom off of the master bedroom. It has city water, electric, gas, and a septic system. A separate grey-water system utilizes the kitchen sinks and laundry water.

The top of the property has been swaled and bermed on contour with over 700 shrubs and trees. It is on a timed drip system. There are apple and cherry trees in the side yard as well as a large, fenced garden. Water from frost-free hydrants is available throughout most of the property.

The greenhouse is thriving and the citrus trees look good. The peach trees in the vestibule actually have peaches starting to grow. Amazing, as they were only planted last June, 2020.

If you are interested in what we have on auction, the house, or are just curious, here is the auction information:
 
https://wyopetersenauctionservice.com/event/personal-real-estate-auction-medicine-bow-wyoming/

https://www.facebook.com/PetersenAuctionService/
 
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Hello, i’m a 26 yearold single father. I am in Laramie, WY. I’m trying to find shelter to
were i can work and stay for the winter. Been following the threads between this group and others. Was curious if you new of some communities willing to do a long term stay through the winter months in exchange work stay and possible job once given the time and opportunity. I’m aware of the SHTF situation we are in and am looking to build a better and more secure life for my sons future. Any help is appreciated i some how ended up in the wrong side of the enemy lines here in Laramie. Talk about that in more detail privately. 2082232779 via email t.jb_21@yahoo.com
 
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Thank you very much for documenting and sharing your story and your process.  I just spent the better part of an hour and a half reading this entire thread and I'm fascinated!
 
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Curious for any update on what trees and plants have been successful for you this year and what lessons you learned this summer into this fall. I live in MT and will be starting the grand adventure of building mine this spring/early summer.
Staff note (Paul Fookes) :

Thanks for your first post Russell.  Great question.  I look forward to more posts about your journey.
Cheers

 
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