• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Leigh Tate
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • paul wheaton
  • Mike Haasl
master gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • John F Dean
  • Jay Angler
  • Beau Davidson
gardeners:
  • Jordan Holland
  • thomas rubino
  • Nancy Reading

Pinecones for material for small scale biochar?

 
gardener
Posts: 3695
462
7
forest garden fungi trees food preservation bike medical herbs
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hello Amelia,
Welcome to permies.  I think that urine is a good inoculant. There are many others, and there are many threads about inoculants in this forum.

Here is a discussion of using bought charcoal from a store:
https://permies.com/t/150787/Biochar-charcoal-bought-store

John S
PDX OR
 
John Suavecito
gardener
Posts: 3695
462
7
forest garden fungi trees food preservation bike medical herbs
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have just used a lot of pine cones in my last two biochars and it worked really well.  They are easy to collect and ready to burn.  The only caveat I have is, don't add them at the end, because they seem to off gas a bit more than other wood and they still need to be charred like other wood.  They work like kindling, so you can use them with paper or cardboard to get the fire really roaring.  I put them at the top of my TLUD.
John S
PDX OR
 
John Suavecito
gardener
Posts: 3695
462
7
forest garden fungi trees food preservation bike medical herbs
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I forgot to mention.  Japanese knotweed should be a great one to make biochar out of.  My only caveat is to make sure that you aren't accidentally creating more of the plants.  It can root from a small piece of the plant.  I live in the PNWet, so I wouldn't do that in between October and April.  However, it tends to be very dry here from about May to September, so I would chop it then, collect every part of it, dry it out, and then yes, make biochar out of it.  Did you know that Japanese knotweed is the primary commercial source of resveratrol for the supplement industry? I 'm  almost 60, so I make medicine out of the plant as I"m killing it. Resveratrol is the medicine in red wine that helped create the French paradox-why are they so healthy if they eat goose liver and drink wine all day? I just put the chopped up orange roots into glycerin to make a glycerite-extract.  Improves my health and saves me money!

John S
PDX OR
 
John Suavecito
gardener
Posts: 3695
462
7
forest garden fungi trees food preservation bike medical herbs
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Exactly.
 
Posts: 206
24
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm trying the pinecone char.
Need to pyrolysis longer. Only charged outside cones, next time tin is going into a campfire on it's side so I can see when the flames die.
PXL_20220930_195441362.jpg
Start
Start
PXL_20220930_195809295.MP.jpg
Pocket rocket
Pocket rocket
PXL_20220930_200331245.MP.jpg
Char
Char
PXL_20221003_205012286.jpg
Seawater mineralization
Seawater mineralization
PXL_20220930_212942208.jpg
Deer poo inoculation
Deer poo inoculation
 
John Suavecito
gardener
Posts: 3695
462
7
forest garden fungi trees food preservation bike medical herbs
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Those are Douglas fir cones.  I don't use the retorts like that because the volume of char generated is so small. It would take too long to make a difference digging it into my suburban yard,  but it might be a good fit for someone else's project.
John S
PDX OR
 
Aurora House
Posts: 206
24
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Yes they are Doug fir I have a lot so I thought they would be good proof of concept fule. Unfortunately the pocket rocket was too hard to tell when they were done or not hot enough to work for any but the outside layer. But practice makes perfect, when I get better at getting a complete burn I'll try to scale up.
So tried the campfire heat today. I could hear the gas rushing out of the pinhole in the lid. When it stopped I tried rolling the can to stir the insides and the lid popped off. Given the flames dancing on the cones still inside I don't think it was done yet. More experiments needed.
 
Come have lunch with me Arthur. Adventure will follow. This tiny ad:
177 hours of video: the 2017 Permaculture Design Course and Appropriate Technology Course
https://permies.com/wiki/65386/hours-video-Permaculture-Design-Technology
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic