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hazelnut thread

 
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A chance find:
Code of arms, Langenlehsten, Germany.



Origin: The village´s name means „village at the hazel shrubs” in old Wendish language.
 
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Definitely neat. Minor correction: it's "coat of arms", though I have to say, "code of arms" makes as much sense.

JD
 
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Tuesday, November 05, 2013 12:12:07 AM Subject: hazelnut thread

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John Polk wrote:

If they have a lean, hungry winter, they will be much less likely to reproduce.
Abundance of food promotes abundance of squirrels.



Not according to Geoff Lawton! He made a big deal about how infertility clinics are only in wealthy countries and poor people (and animals) are more fertile. I guess they need to breed more if the mortality rate is high.


C.J. do you think perhaps that is because of the increased use of medications and processed foods?
 
Al Senner
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Sorry, I dont know how to do a proper quote here!
 
pollinator
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Al Senner wrote:
John Polk wrote:
If they have a lean, hungry winter, they will be much less likely to reproduce.
Abundance of food promotes abundance of squirrels.

Not according to Geoff Lawton! He made a big deal about how infertility clinics are only in wealthy countries and poor people (and animals) are more fertile. I guess they need to breed more if the mortality rate is high.

C.J. do you think perhaps that is because of the increased use of medications and processed foods?



No, although I'm not sure what kind of research has been done. You'd need to find "wealthy" populations that don't use medications or processed foods. It could be done with non-humans but I don't know if it has.

It is a well-known "permaculture" observation. As I mentioned before, if you stress some plants they will produce more as a direct reaction to the stress like, say, coppicing. You wont get many big shoots, but you will get more total shoots than if you did not stress (cut) the plant. Hazelnuts are a plant that reacts that way.

BTW, hit the QUOTE button to easily quote. It's brown on the right side of the screen between the thumbs up (+1) & report buttons.
 
Cj Sloane
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Ha!

So I just laid down a hazelnut sapling, staking it with a heavy log, and I've been debating cutting it partially so I thought I'd better check permies. Now, I guess I'd better follow the plan I laid out last fall!
 
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i planted 5 american hazels and 2 european hazels this year as well as 3 hybrid chestnuts.  All put on good growth throughout the summer.  Now I know they will grow here.  I'm sure their zone 4 cold hardiness will suffice for my zone 6 winter. Next spring i want to scale up the experiment with 50+ hazels and 20+ chestnuts.
 
pollinator
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Brenda Groth wrote:I searched but didnt' find a hazelnut thread so I thought I would start one.

3 or 4 years ago I planted 6 hazelnuts and a neighbor planted 2. Mine were 4 from one nursery and 2 from another, just sticks.

Well they grew like wildfire and even with the drought we had this year, 4 of the 6 have nuts on them. I was so thrilled to see the pretty soft green clusters of moist nuts, just babies but already the size of marbles, and a real promise of proteins growing on my property.

I have read about hazelnuts and I have read that you can eat them in the unripe green stage and that they should be eaten with a bit of salt, or you can wait for them to fall free from the husks and dry them and eat them the usual way.

As I have never had a fresh hazelnut this is all new to me, but I'm loving the idea that i have a chance to try fresh hazelnuts off my own trees. There won't be a lot but there are more than I figured I'd get in only a few years, so I'm happy. I figure I'm going to have to find a way to protect them from the browsers, i'm thinking that as they begin to ripen I might wrap something around the clusters to deter racoons and squirrels. Our squirrels are well fed in the front yard and the red oaks are loaded with acorns this year, so I'm  hoping they'll not really pay attention to the hazelnuts which are out of that area, but I'm going to keep an eye on them anyway.

I want them for me.

I am hoping to get a crop from all of my nut trees before I die (2 black walnuts, 1 carpathian walnut, 1 butternut, 2 heartnut, 6 hazelnuts, 2 sweet chestnut, 1 hardy almond and 2 hickory) but most of them are all still babies less than 5 years old...so this years baby hazelnuts is a hope and a promise to me.

Am posting this thread for a hazelnut discussion and even open to recipes and storage ideas, etc.. Wish I had a bunch of those mesh onion bags to tie around them, but don't..but i'll have my thinking cap on and am open to ideas.

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harvest 2017
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Brenda Groth
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My 2017 harvest.
20170912_183127.jpg
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Brenda Groth
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Picked a lot of them, may get more before squirrels finish
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I love a woman who dresses in stainless steel ... and carries tiny ads:
Voices of Transition--documentary, streaming
https://permies.com/t/143498/Voices-Transition-documentary-streaming
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