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food and drink at the project  RSS feed

 
steward
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Looks delicious!

I'm so glad you are using the juicer: I bought that back in the 20th century and rarely used it even when I had a kitchen big enough to store it in reach. In the new almost-tiny house (<800 sq ft until we get the attic useable) there's absolutely no space for such a beast of a machine. I'm making room for the Vita-Prep (recently reminded myself how much better mayonnaise is when emulsified by the "super blender") because it is smaller and easier to clean. I have to choose my tools in this place. . .
 
steward
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That looks awesome! Isn't nice when you know the story behind your food?
 
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Some Hearty Beef stew at Wheaton Labs!
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Location: Travelling around Europe
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Sorry to be a pooper but I'm curious as to how much of the food that is eaten on this permaculture project is grown or produced on-site?

From what is written here, it looks like you're buying all or most of it. I'm confused :S
 
Julia Winter
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Benett, the only food produced on site thus far has been some pork (I think). They just bought the place last summer and the first priority was housing, not planting. There are cattle and pork on site, I think there are no longer goats or chickens but with more people to watch them I imagine that might change. The land is dry, rocky, rather sloped and mostly populated with pine/fir/spruce. This is Montana. Mountainsides in Montana.

Patience, grasshopper. The food will come!
 
Benett Freeman
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I see. What food is planned to be grown in the future?
 
master steward
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Julia Winter wrote:Benett, the only food produced on site thus far has been some pork (I think). They just bought the place last summer and the first priority was housing, not planting. There are cattle and pork on site, I think there are no longer goats or chickens but with more people to watch them I imagine that might change. The land is dry, rocky, rather sloped and mostly populated with pine/fir/spruce. This is Montana. Mountainsides in Montana.

Patience, grasshopper. The food will come!



Thanks, Julia, you are correct! Though base camp is far rockier and more steep than the lab which has 16-ft deep soil and expansive meadows in places.
 
Jocelyn Campbell
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Benett Freeman wrote:I see. What food is planned to be grown in the future?



If you go to the seeds and suppliers for the first year thread (note there are two pages) you'll see that Emily and Tony helped us order a bunch of seeds and plants. We hope to create a podcast or two about our seeds and choices. And I'm sure there will be more pics and such in this forum as we grow (double entendre intended).
 
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I consider buying local food directly from farmers or from our food co-op to be eating within my system. I grow a variety of food and look forward to growing more in the future but I never plan to grow everything! I hope the folks at the land buy/trade/barter with other farmers even as food production gets going in earnest. A community is vital to a thriving permaculture system.
 
Sam Barber
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I made some Berry clafouti tonight and it did not last very long when it was served.
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Sam Barber
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So the coconut whipped cream that I made to top the clafouti with is super easy to make it takes less then five minutes to make it. The first thing did was opened up two cans of Thai kitchen organic full fat cocnut milk.
Then I scooped out only the fat cream part out of the top of the cans into the Kitchen Aid or other whisking mixer, I left the liquid part in the can. Then whisk the cream on high for a few minutes until it looks like whipped cream. Then I added a heaping tbsp of sugar and a tablespoon of vanilla extract more or less to taste. Then whisk on high until all the ingredients have a consistent whipped look. You can then chill it or serve it right away if you want to. I recomend letting your cans of Coconut milk sitt in a cold place for a while so it can settle and cool off before making the whipped cream.
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Sam Barber
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Pan seared rosemary garlic beef heart, caramelized carrots, french fries cooked in rendered beef heart fat, fresh baked rolls, and a kale salad. Awesome job oliver!
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Sam Barber
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Here is the hamburger that we made for dinner. There were several birthdays this week so we decided it would awesome to have a celebratory hamburger. It contained 8lbs of burger, 6lbs of Bun, 4lbs of bacon total weight of 18lbs. The whole thing was made from scratch by our awesome kitchen commander Oliver.
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Sam Barber
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Mexican style chicken, Chips and Guacamole, Rice and a salad with pears on it.
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Julia Winter
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yum
 
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Looks like you're eating well! My mouth is watering. Maybe a lab cookbook?
 
Jocelyn Campbell
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Yes, we have been eating well. To thank the crew for working in the mud (even more!) and because I could stir a pot easier than I could dig in the mud with my still-recovering left wrist, I made pudding, paleo-style.

I found this chocolate pudding recipe.



Though dumping the gelatin into hot milk is not recommended. I had to break out the stick blender to smooth out the globs that formed. I would soften the gelatin first, in part of the milk - unheated! - then add that into the rest of the hot stuff.

And we used Sapphire Permaculture Apiary honey!

Here's how ours was looking before chilling.
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Julia Winter
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I was just talking to a nurse whose grandson is on the autistic spectrum, and has benefitted greatly from the GAPS diet. He loves fermented baby carrots! She buys the little pre-peeled carrots and packs them with whey from the extra-fermented yogurt they make him (the longer you ferment yogurt, the fewer carbs are in it). That sounds so easy, I want to try it myself.
 
Sam Barber
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Here is what we had tonight!
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Jocelyn Campbell
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Sometimes the Prius gets a bit cozy on wheaton labs grocery days!
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Jocelyn Campbell
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Just realized we should link to the awesome discussion about deep pantry, pantry "par", and bulk food storage at the deep pantry for people who like food thread that Adrien started.

We are trying to get away from plastic. It's a process.
 
Jocelyn Campbell
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We eat a lot of yummy frittatas around here.
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frittata
 
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Jocelyn Campbell wrote:We eat a lot of yummy frittatas around here.


What's the ratio of ingredients to make a frittata of that texture? Mine always crumble.
 
Jocelyn Campbell
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Roger Taylor wrote:What's the ratio of ingredients to make a frittata of that texture? Mine always crumble.



Hm, let's see. This was about:
1/2 pound pork sausage, cooked
1/2 each of onion, green bell pepper, red bell pepper, yellow (summer) squash, all sauteed in lard/butter
16 eggs whisked a lot, then coconut milk (the liquid part of canned full-fat coconut milk poured off the fat Paul likes for his coffee) whisked in
salt & pepper
paprika sprinkled on top
poured the eggs over the warm veggies & sausage and baked at 350F for a little over half an hour

Normally, I like greens in my frittata - spinach, kale, lamb's quarters, chard, etc. - but we were out. If the greens took up more room in the pan I might have kept it to a dozen eggs instead of the 16.

Dang, I forgot to sprinkle green onions/scallions on top!
 
Julia Winter
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that looks delicious!

I just keep making omelettes over and over. . .
 
Jocelyn Campbell
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Thanks Julia! Omelettes are awesome, too, I'm just not always patient enough to make those.

Here's one of Paul's favorites: ham-egg cups. There's sautéed onion beneath the egg and that's cilantro on top. The recipe actually calls for sautéed shallots with a little crème fraîche, then you put the egg on top and bake it. And it recommended topping with fresh tarragon. I think any green herb works, IMHO. I also like sautéed mushroom under the egg. Once, I did take some coconut fat (from the full-fat canned coconut milk) and whisked in a squirt of apple cider vinegar and used that in place of crème fraîche and it was passable.

We don't mind cold eggs, so we like these as leftovers, straight out of the fridge, too. They're handy!

Oh, and runny yolks are the best! (FWIW, I also zested the grapefruit peel before cutting to use in making natural cleansers.)

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ham-egg cups
 
Adrien Lapointe
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I'll have to try this with the Easter ham leftovers. The ham is curing right now, hopefully it turns out good (first trial).
 
Jocelyn Campbell
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Ooo, I'd like to see pictures of your ham, Adrien! (Maybe in the whats for dinner thread?) Thinly sliced or deli-style works best. If you notice the bottom of the middle one above, it kind of split from being pushed and bent into the muffin tin. When it does that, some of the egg white gets left behind in the muffin tin underneath the ham - less so if greased and scooped out well.
 
Julia Winter
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Those ham cups are gorgeous, Jocelyn.

Adrien, did you buy a whole or half hog? Ham is really rewarding to make.
 
Adrien Lapointe
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I bought a whole hog from my dad last fall, so I made lots of bacon, and I now have a portion of a leg curing as prosciutto.
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Prosciutto curing
 
Adrien Lapointe
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Jocelyn Campbell wrote:Ooo, I'd like to see pictures of your ham, Adrien! (Maybe in the whats for dinner thread?)



Just posted a picture here
 
Julia Winter
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That's going to be awesome!

Just FYI, I was advised to wrap my prosciutto in four loose layers of cheesecloth, so that it could continue to dry, but no insects could gain entry. This time of year there aren't many little flying things, but that will probably change! I don't think it slowed down the drying time. I made two, and started eating one at 6 months, didn't cut into the second one for a year.

I think the cheese cloth advice came from Michael Ruhlman's book "Charcuterie." That's a great book, if you haven't seen it. It covers all sorts of meat products: bacon, ham, sausage, pate', and on into the complicated stuff, like fermented sausages. Also terrines and confit.

I also think I read a sad story on the internet of cutting into a prosciutto and finding the middle hollowed out by bugs - that got to me!
 
Jocelyn Campbell
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Both gorgeous pictures, Adrien! The cheesecloth sounds helpful, Julia. In another thread someone recommended mutton cloth, which is slightly less open-weave from the sounds of it, though I couldn't find a source in the U.S.
 
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Jocelyn, Mutton cloth is also known as stockinette which is available on Amazon mostly as tubular bandages.
 
Jocelyn Campbell
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Philip Jurkowich wrote:Jocelyn, Mutton cloth is also known as stockinette which is available on Amazon mostly as tubular bandages.


Oh wow! Thanks Philip! Look, I found these listed as stockinette ham bags. Very cool.

 
Jocelyn Campbell
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This deserved a bit of a revisit.

Jocelyn Campbell wrote:
We mostly eat paleo-ish around here - very much organic or better and grassfed meats. Which means lots of veggies, meat, eggs, plenty of animal fats, naturally fermented foods and some fruits. We try to minimize starchy foods and sugar, and are not eating much in the way of dairy products at this time, though we imagine incorporating raw milk products from animals on the land.



When folks are invited to dine with Paul, this is the type of food that is served.

When others dine with us who are more used to higher carb foods like grains and starches, we often make rice, oats, noodles, beans, bread, etc. as a separate side that folks can choose or not.

Paul finds that dairy* and grains slow down his mental abilities.
Jocelyn is gluten free, dairy free,* and finds that grains create inflammation in her joints.

*we typically use coconut milk in place of milk, cream, etc. though butter seems to be okay for us so we use lots of butter!

We don't want cane sugar in our regular daily meals. Even the occasional sweet treats are better made with other whole food sweeteners (maple syrup, honey, fruit juice, stevia) if possible.

If a vegetarian or vegan is joining us for a meal, we might saute the veg side in coconut oil instead of bacon fat, and/or cook a side of quinoa or beans, but we generally won't have an entire second main dish or entirely separate vegetarian options.
 
Jocelyn Campbell
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See Paul's new thread eating at my table where he explains that cooks here are not asked to respond to special orders or special diets of guests and visitors who are invited to dine with Paul.

 
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Jocelyn : One picture is worth a 1000 words Mutton Cloth or Tubular Stockinette bandage comes in ALL sizes from finger(s) bandage to tubular
material to help secure dressings on chest injuries !

All of the White Cloth Caps Seen worn by the M*A*S*H surgeons were a tubular stockinette See Link :


http://warmovieblog.com/archives/27-mash-1970.html

Presumably the thickness of this material keep flies from direct contact with the hanging meat ! For the Crafts ! Big AL
 
Jocelyn Campbell
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Oh, great tips and trivia Big Al! Thanks!
 
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