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moisturiser for sensitive skin?

 
pollinator
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Location: La Palma (Canary island) Zone 11
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Tobias Ber wrote:hey linda...

i m no expert but what might help:

- aloe vera leave gel (grow them yourself)

- wash with water and then apply oil or fat (olive oil ... hemp seed oil should be very good ... evening primrose oil??? ... butter or ghee ... maybe shea butter??)


best wishes

tobias



I have found how to make a better recipe!
It happened to me just by chance...

I tried coconut oil on my skin after damaging with cement.
I was not satisfied with the imidiate result and it stayed greasy... so I decided to try aloe vera (i grow it), and I did not wash the oil... It was like a miracle! It made like a milk on my skin, and my skin litteraly sucked it! Is there a natural emulsifyer in aloe gel? Maybe....

Then I went to bed with gloves on this.... The next morning I could not even believe it.... soft skin and no more skin flakes at all.
 
gardener
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Miki Odendahl wrote:

And, as with any natural products like these, whether you use water, borax, vitamin e, whatnot; refrigerating and/or freezing them in small containers (I use 2 oz jars for most) will delay rancidity. All of my saleable products say "refrigerate when not in use" on the labels for just this reason.



Hi Miki,

I can't remember if I included meadowfoam oil in the recipe I posted,so I will mention that I add an ounce or two of meadowfoam oil to a batch that includes 12 oz of liquid oils.

The wonderful thing about meadowfoam oil is that it is very very very stable.  As far as I know, it does not go rancid or oxidize.  Additionally it stabilizes and protects the oils it is in mixture with from deteriorating.

I didn't have time to recheck my data here, but it might be worth looking in to,for anyone concerned about stability, rancidity and all that.  I have had my skin cream unrefrigerated for months with no ill effects, and even left it in the sun sometimes.  Find it fresh and unseparated.  I sell this cream, and have many satisfied customers who also have not reported the cream going off or needing refrigeration.  I attribute it to the meadowfoam oil.
 
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I used to have terrible skin. Eczema, cracked and bleeding hands in the winter, the works. Cleaning up my diet fixed most of it. You need healthy fats, especially animal fats. Pasture raised beef is best for me. I very rarely bother with lip balms and such anymore. I mildly react to coconut, at least used topically, so that's out for me. Wheat especially but grains in general cause issues for me, as do "normal" quantities of sugars and sufficient quantities of tomato. I did try rendering tallow for a while and that was great for my skin so I can see where tallow balms would be helpful. You'll get much needed zinc from red meat too. There is a substantial taste and visual difference between pasture raised and CAFO beef fat but go with what you can find and afford.
 
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I remember a movie scene where a native American after eating roasted meat wiped his greasy hands on his body and told the white man "is good, makes skin strong"
 
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I struggled with dry skin/lips well into my 30’s.  Dermatologists were no help. What I finally learned: avoid mineral oil, Vaseline, petrolatum ... all related ingredients. Yo7 would be surprised how ubiquitous thos3 ingredients are in lotions, including those ‘recommended by doctors’ (such as eucerin), and even in high $$ products. Once I learned to read ingredient labels, my skin dry problems were greatly reduced. I often make my own lotions (lots of recipes online of in libraries), but there are products without the bad stuff in all price ranges for when I’m lazy.

Not everyone is sensitive to mineral oil and petrolatum, and given how common lotions are that contain them, maybe most people to,erase them well. But if you have problems with dryness that hydration and lotions aren’t helping, try eliminating those ingredients.

I have tried straight o,I e oil and straight coconut oil. They work for me in the short run, but aren’t good long term solutions for me.

Experiment, making note if ingredients that don’t work  for you.  
 
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I too have horrible eczema, and what works best for me is the medication Triamcinolone. But, to reduce the use of it, I use Cereva. It's $15 a tub or so but lasts a very long time. As others said, avoiding vaseline. Oil traps moisture in but doesn't add moisture, so using coconut oil during a shower will help but not if you wait much after your shower.
 
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Linda Secker wrote:Hi All

do you have any recipes for moisturising sensitive skin and lips? I get very dry skin in places, and my skin is sensitive to all sorts of things. I need a thick cream for hands, feet, elbows and knees, and a lightweight cream for my face. I also get occasional patches of eczema. I'm particularly bothered about lip stuff - I've tried several lip balms here in the UK, some natural, some not, and the only thing that actually works is vaseline which is petroleum jelly - yeuch!!!

If anyone has any suggestions, I'd like to try making something!

Linda



Hi Gang-

ALOE BUDDY

You can try my recipe, a lifelong pursuit to agreeably care for extreme dry skin.
for body, not for face except on occasion.

ingredients (all organic please...)
1. Aloe Vera leaf, fresh cut from a plant
2. Vegetable Glycerin
3. Hemp Seed or Jojoba Oil

---------------
KEEP IT SIMPLE, never get anal on recipes- just eyeball relative measures and you'll be perfect enough -

1. de-spine the edges of the aloe leaf(s), and slice leaves into pieces, put into a blender leaf skin and all.
   liquify that for a few minutes best you can, until you get a greenish goo in there

2. ADD the same amount of glycerin to match the aloe goo. so you now have 50/50 of both. blend again, few minutes.

3. ADD the oil, not too much, about 1/4 to 1/6 of the mixture. this acts as an emollient, or a smoother if you will,
   to the consistency of the lotion. blend again, couple minutes untill all lumpy things go away.

4. DECANT all to a large GLASS jar, which shall be the master, which decants to your personal container(s), especially when you give samples to others.
   USE a rubber spat to remove every smidgeon of lotion from blender.

5. ADD a few drops of essential oils to the master jar with tight lid- tea tree (3), rosemary (6), lemon (6), peppermint (1 drop!)....shake furiously.

6. decant to daily use container, and store the master somewhere cool and dark.

7. IMPORTANT: to be used after shower or bath, dry your hair and back, but do NOT dry your body.

instead, add a few drops rubbed between palms and massage your wet arms, perhaps going into upper torso- then a few drops to massage your wet legs- then midsection, you get the idea, adjust amounts until you're covered. not TOO much!

8. at first, experiment until you apply the right amount everyday, and you'll be surprised at how little you might need everyday. one smallish bottle lasts me
   about a month, or months, for example.

ENJOY and please POST YOUR RESULTS!










 
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Hello,

I just found this thread and thought I would add my 2 cents:

https://www.motherearthliving.com/health-and-wellness/homemade-face-cream-zm0z18jazols

I have extremely dry skin, live in the desert and have eczema. I've been making and using Rosemary Gladstar's Perfect Cream for over 10 years and just love it. She is such a generous soul, she makes this recipe available to everyone for no charge.

One can make this cream more therapeutic by infusing calendula and chamomile in the olive oil first. one of the simplest methods is solar infusion: Fill a clean jar 3/4 full with dried herb then pour in extra virgin olive oil to cover herbs. Use a chopstick or similar to swirl and remove air bubbles. Cover tightly and place in a sunny location for about six weeks. Shake thoroughly twice a day for the first week to keep the herbs covered, add a bit more oil if needed. The herbs may mold if they are not covered with the oil.
 
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I swear by tallow. Infused with calendula, roses, lavender, plantain, &/or neem - or any combination. These are all nourishing and great for most skin types(including my ridiculously sensitive, pale, Scott/Irish/redhead's skin). Some herbs,  like rosemary, witchazel, tea tree, and others can be harsh or drying. Coconut oil is comedogenic, and can block pores, and I can't use it, topically. My understanding is that I'm not even close to unique, in this.
 
pioneer
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There is a one size fits all approach to all the things that have been mentioned in the topic and threads.  We have a really good moisturiser for all skin, based on honey.
Basic ingredients are bees wax, manuka honey and good quality olive oil.  Warm and mix all the ingredients and add some anti-inflammatory such as calendula petals and it is that simple.
The quantities depend on where you live and what season it is.  If you are in the tropics, you need more wax and less honey and oil because it will stay soft.  If you are in the permafrost regions of the world, you will need more olive oil and less wax.
Start with the wax and honey in roughly the same portions and add olive oil until you are happy that you have an ointment consistency when cooled.  Keep note of the quantities that work for your region and you will know for next time.
My wife uses our one all over her body and in her hair.  The hair is easy - coat the tip of the bristles with some moisturiser and brush through your hair.  100 strokes as mother used to say.
Essential oils can be very damaging to sensitive skin so adding the petals ensures that any micro-chemicals that may otherwise not be extracted or destroyed by distillation are present.  Often a broad spectrum product rather than a distillate works much better.

When going out, have a small pot to take with you.  I use it on my hands and feet for dry rough skin then get the sandpaper onto the heels to stop craters forming.
Manuka honey which typically comes from New Zealand, has specific healing properties but any good quality honey, especially if it is your own will fit the bill.
 
Carla Burke
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Hi, Paul! Honey and beeswax are amazing, and I use them for many of my herbal concoctions. If/ when I use olive oil, it must be a very light one,  and even then, I'm not a big fan of how it feels on my skin. I really do like tallow better, in most cases. Have you ever tried macadamia nut oil? That stuff is incredible, for skin! Unfortunately, it (like most nut oils seem to do) also goes rancid, rather quickly, in comparison to olive oil, lard, and tallow. But, blended with beeswax and honey, and done in small batches, so that it gets used up quickly, it's divine.
 
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I have been using aloe vera and some skincare serum for a year then my sister suggested me to try the https://blog.simplyearth.com/diy-moisturizing-face-cream/ it composes of aloe vera gel and some natural oil it is working on me actually moisture and remove dead skin from my face. I hope this recipe might help.
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