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Lupini/Lupine For Human Consumption

 
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No hits in the forum on Lupini or lupine for human food.
Pros: All the benefits of lupine- flowers, butterflies, Nitrogen fixing, perennial, PLUS you can eat the beans, which contain all the essential aminoacids, so it is one of the few vegan perfect proteins.

Cons: Wild lupin beans contain toxic alkaloids and must soaked or brined before consumption. Cultivated "sweet" lupines can be pollinated by wild and produce high alkaloid beans.

I have eaten them at a restaurant and quite enjoyed them. Would it be reasonable to try and grow these to fill a significant portion of my family's protein needs? Has anyone grown these for food on a small scale?

The wikipedia article for those interested

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lupin_bean
lupine.jpg
[Thumbnail for lupine.jpg]
 
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Lupine like well drained soil.
I live in a area with alot of silt and clay so Lupines not an option.
If you do not have Lupines and have good draining soil than why not grow it as a percentage of your grains
This assumes that your area does not have tons of wild Lupines.

Looks like if you have a isolation distance of 100 meters you should be ok. See link below.

http://www.ogtr.gov.au/internet/ogtr/publishing.nsf/content/42D3AAD51452D5ECCA2574550015E69F/$File/biologylupin2013-2.pdf


Where are you buying your sweet Lupines?
 
Matt Darkstar
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My soil is a mix of sand and clay, wild lupine does grow in the area but not in huge quantities, most are probably garden escapes. Thanks for that Australian gov link. I am super happy to read that lupine is used as a heavy part of fish diet, for salmon and trout. Also I wouldn't rule out lupine based on your soil type, they are pretty tolerant once established and in that packet you posted it lists L. luteus as adapted to transient waterlogging.

http://www.australiangardener.com.au/viewitem.php?productid=309

This site sells international.

The three varieties commonly grown in Australia as "sweet" are augustifolius, luteus, and alba. All 3 varieties can be purchased as seed in the US but I know that alba and luteus are generally considered as bitter and need to be treated before human consumption. Kinda confused by all the cultivars within the same species. I would most likely debitter any seeds I would eat just to be safe, but I would like to start out with a low alkaloid seed also.

Does anyone have any more info on cultivars?
 
Posts: 98
Location: BC Interior, zone 5a
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here's the only "sweet" lupin I've been able to find so far

http://www.covercropsolutions.com/products/cool-season-legumes.php

still looking for someone selling it in Canada
 
Cee Ray
Posts: 98
Location: BC Interior, zone 5a
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according to this study lupins have significantly more alkaloids in lower pH soils and vice versa

http://www.hindawi.com/journals/ija/2012/269878/

Vitabor seems to be a good cultivar
 
Posts: 88
Location: Castelo Branco, Portugal
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Hi Matt.

Here in Portugal we eat a lot of Lupinus Albus, normally as a snack mix with peanuts and beer. I sowed them last Autumn as a green manure in my farm and took some to eat and they are a great protein food.
Sure they are unfit to eat raw but the preparation it's not that hard or time consuming.
Lupinus Luteus are normally given to animals but i never heard about them for human consumption.

Take care
 
pollinator
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Location: AndalucĂ­a, Spain
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In Spain we eat then too, as a snack. I don't think they are particularly delicious though - but will plant some anyways bc of their other properties.
 
Matt Darkstar
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What is your typical process for preparing them? I have only had them pickled, with some chili spices.
 
Velho Barbudo
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Location: Castelo Branco, Portugal
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Normally i leave them in water for the night, at lunch time i cook them for 30-60 min and after that i just change water every 4h for 3-4 days and keep adding a lot of salt. I guess you can pretty much prepare them as you wish, salt, spices....etc
 
Matt Darkstar
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That is a lot of water changing, I hope that I can find a source for sweet lupins.
 
pollinator
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Location: Melbourne FL, USA - Pine and Palmetto Flatland, Sandy and Acidic
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Matt Darkstar wrote:

Does anyone have any more info on cultivars?



I would like to ask this same question. One question is whether the cultivars have bred out the alkaloids. Hopefully not through hybridization, I mean I like the idea of a consistent strain. The flower of this plant looks amazing with the seeds so convenient to harvest being bundled together requiring only a handy pair of scissors. Other interests of mine are nectar quality for honey bees. I tell you what though, Youtube is a great source of information.

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Did you see these? http://www.rareseeds.com/store/flowers/lupine/edible/
 
Posts: 17
Location: South of Quebec city, Canada, zone 4
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Hi! I found this blog while looking for perrenial sweet lupine, it seems that they do exist, however I dont know if it is possible to get seeds from them

http://lupin-fin.blogspot.ca/2007/01/perennial-forms-of-washington-lupin-for.html
 
Posts: 44
Location: Lexington, KY
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I know this is an old post, but I wanted to leave a warning on lupin for anyone with a peanut allergy. Lupin can cause a cross-reaction in people who are allergic to peanuts, so if you grow them, please share that warning with anyone you share lupin with for consumption. I had hoped to plant some lupin in my own yard, but my son is very allergic to peanuts, so I had to cross them off my list. Here is a warning out of Canada:

https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/food-nutrition/food-labelling/allergen-labelling/information-canadians-peanut-allergy-concerning-lupin.html
 
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One pack left here: https://www.agroforestry.co.uk/product/lupinus-albus-dieta/
 
steward
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Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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I grow "sweet" lupini, which seems to mean that they are slightly less nasty bitter than the wild strains. And the amount of soaking required for edibility is outrageous. So I put them in the category of famine food.
 
sam na
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'Dieta' is available in the UK

http://www.soya-uk.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/WHITE-LUPINS-A5-LEAFLET.pdf

"But now we have found a new sweet lupin- the Dieta Lupin was bred in the UK specially for human use and is completely non-bitter, even without any special preparation."

http://www.realseeds.co.uk/lupins.html

However it's an Annual.
 
Have you seen Paul's rant on CFLs?
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