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Oats  RSS feed

 
Posts: 64
Location: Brantford, ON Canada
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http://www.durgan.org/URL/?PABYN 18 November 2014 Cavena Nuda,Cavena oat groats.
While trying to find raw oat grains, some information was found about the various oats sold for human consumption.There is only one type oat available in raw form and this is a relatively recently developed grain.I bought some today from a bulk barn store, for use in making tortillas and gruel or porridge.
A new type of oat kernel or groat.
Cavena Nuda is a brand new form of oats that’s hull-less, gluten free, high in protein & iron & cooks up just like brown rice. Now you can get all the health benefits of oats in a grain that you can use as you would rice in recipes. It was developed by Agriculture Canada, and for now it’s only available in Canada. It was developed without a hull (NAKED), so the oats don’t have to be shipped off somewhere to remove the hull–a necessary process to prevent spoilage & rancidity. It is also 25% higher in protein than regular oats-twice the iron, & 20% more fiber.

This is the treatment for typical oats.Hulls are removed from oats, leaving an oat groat. Oat groats are high in fat, so once the hull is removed, an oat groat will go rancid within a few days. Therefore, all oat groats for human consumption are hulled, then “stabilized” (heated to 200 degrees for an hour or more to stabilize enzyme action). As a result oat groats won’t sprout and aren’t raw. Steel cut oats and Scottish oats are cut after the heating process. To produce rolled oats, stabilized oats are steamed then rolled. A number of oat producers were contacted in Canada and the US, and they confirmed the above.

Groats (or in some cases, “berries”), are the hulled kernels of various cereal grains such as oat, wheat, and rye. Groats are whole grains that include the cereal germ and fiber-rich bran portion of the grain as well as the endosperm.
http://www.durgan.org/URL/?YMUWK More Internet information

 
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I have struck deal with a farmer friend and have gotten wheat in 5 gal buckets from the combine at avoided cost.  Hand grind it myself and make whole-wheat bread. Of course I share the bread with the farmer, which has definitely developed our friendship. A few years after this arrangement started he told me he had a few acres in oats and asked if I would be interested in some out of the combine oats.  Of course I said yes.  The hull on oats does not come off in the combine like for wheat.  This has been quite an odyssey. I deeply believe that back in the era of draft animals, pre gas engines, farmers grew more than half of their fields in oats to feed the draft animals.  I can't believe that they did not have a manual means to remove the hull for family consumption?  But all my queries have come up empty.  Anyone able to share a bit of history on how the resourceful farmer's wife would remove the hull off of fresh oats?  The current process uses a hypersonic impacting technique.  Doesn't should like a good process for someone that wants to process 5 to 20# of oats for oatmeal?

I appreciate any info you might share.

Jim Mc  
 
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Posts: 1987
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
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Hi James, welcome to Permies!  I'm interested in the answer to your question as well. 

I gave up on dehulling oats and just grow naked "hulless" oats.  I cut them off at the base of the stalk, take the bunch and slap it against the inside of a big rubbermaid tote and the oats fall off.  To get better slappage I rigged up a cookie drying rack on the side of the tote to slap the oats against.  I have yet to cook with them but the chickens love them and they had good germination this year.  I'm growing 10x the amount this year.
 
James McDonald
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As I stated in the first post.  I am not a true back to basics.  I don't have enough ground to do more than just have a strong vegetable garden, but the idea of being able to process wheat if I could get my hands on it and the fact that wheat can be stored almost indefinitely I wanted to learn to make whole wheat bread by hand.  Then the oats came into the picture.  Every method I could come up with using my existing manual flour mill either didn't separate the groat and hull or the hull had the same density as the pulverized groat and willowing was meaningless.  I tried a screen sifter because the hulls were still substantial larger than the ground groat but the hulls were mostly in the shape of needles and instantly plugged the screen while still allowing some through?  A few other genius ideas but usually ended up with the separation being the killing process?  Thanks for your response. 

I doubt that the farmer would entertain the idea of using hull-less oat seed next time because his reason for planting oats was he missed the planting window for one of his other crops and this was a toss up as to if he would combine it or plow it under to improve the ground based on the price of oats at harvest.  It was a very close call but his wife ended up with a large reserve of chicken feed, because the market for oats was so low it couldn't pay for the fuel for the combine.
 
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