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Malus sieversii (apple's wild ancestor) at the Cornell Orchards (Ithaca, NY)  RSS feed

 
                                  
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Hello,

some of you may or may not be aware that folks from Cornell have gone on multiple expeditions to Asia, to the area where Malus domestica originated.  They've collected seed from Malus sieversii and have some planted trees.

If I were anywhere near NY state, I'd go collect some budwood or seed and have some for yourself (and the forum  :wink

wikipedia:
"Some, but not all, of the resulting trees show unusual disease resistance. The variation in their response to disease on an individual basis is, itself, a sign of how much more genetically diverse they are than their domesticated descendants."

I did the googling the other month and I'm not aware of any other source of this germplasm in North America..

https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/wiki/Malus_sieversii
http://hort.cals.cornell.edu/cals/hort/about/about_orchards.cfm
http://hort.cals.cornell.edu/cals/hort/about/cornell_orchards.cfm
http://www.nysaes.cornell.edu/pubs/press/germplasm.html old article from '96 about collecting the germplasm.  i think they've been back a few times since then.
 
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Location: Eugene, OR
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  Thanks for telling me about this! After reading this article I contacted these people and got them to send be seeds! . Apple breeding, here I come!
 
                                  
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good to hear! i dont even have my own land so there's not much point in acquiring germplasm.

maybe you can find info online, but i can try and recount how to do mass breeding if you really want to search hard for varieties with certain qualities.

if anyone else is reading this, the folks at cornell are supposed to be really friendly, just be polite and professional. 

you should be able to pick out gemrplasm listed here, and search based on specific qualities.
www.ars-grin.gov/npgs/

different groups hold different germplasm, so it can vary how easy it is to get anything.  but cornell has m. sieversii and ive heard first hand accounts of it being do-able.  also from what i've heard there is a sort of deadline in the winter that you have to request it by, or you have to wait for a year, anyway, good luck!
 
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I found 2 places selling these.

http://www.speciestrader.com/Malus/buy-Malus-sieversii-for-sale.html

http://www.orangepippintrees.com/crab-apple-trees/malus-sieversii

I'd like to use a number as root stocks and let some grow to natural form. Seems like these would be more popular since it's a threatened species.
 
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Kirk Hutchison wrote:   Thanks for telling me about this! After reading this article I contacted these people and got them to send be seeds! . Apple breeding, here I come!




Kirk, I know this is an old post but I'm wondering if any of the seeds took.  If they did I would be interested in purchasing some seeds from you.

Regards, Scott
 
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Hi Scott,

I was one of those lurkers who was inspired by this OP. Back in fall 2013 I contacted Cornell University and requested seeds. I stratified 10? seeds in my refrigerator that winter, but after that I'm ashamed to say I pretty much did everything possible to try to destroy them. I left the sprouted seeds in the care of my sister's ex-boyfriend while I lived abroad for a year. When I returned, I planted the coddled seedlings with no protection on property with a resident deer herd. I thought they were definitely goners, as the deer ate them down to nubs. However, they were back again the next two years for a new level of abuse - droughty summers with no irrigation (remember the 50+ days of no rain, PNWers?). I was again out of the country for a month, and left the poor seedlings to fend for themselves. As of August 2017 they were still surviving! Unfortunately I forgot to take pics before the leaves fell off, but I did find these pics from 2014, when they were still in pots.

The rest of the seeds (they sent me a 'small' sampling of 100!) have been in my refrigerator for 4 years. I'm going to stratify some this winter, to hopefully sprout in spring, but I've learned since then that refrigerators really aren't the best place to keep seeds, so we'll see. I'll keep you posted on the seeds and the seedlings come spring.
MalusSieversii1.jpg
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MalusSieversii2.jpg
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MalusSieversii3.jpg
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Rose Lee
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So, I went to take a picture and I forgot to mention....the weeds. This is a little embarassing...

It's hard to tell, but there are actually at least 4 Malus Sieversii in this picture. One in the front with one little leaf on top, back to the right with several stalks, straight back with one long stalk, and back left with 2 skinny stalks. Last I checked there were actually 5 of these, but I can't find the last one, hopefully it will pop out in spring.

Now, they are very SMALL (18 inches tall). However, I believe that is from the neglect, because back in 2015 one of the year-old seedlings was about 2-3 feet tall. I'm hoping that a new location with amendments and regular irrigation will work wonders.
malussieversii4.jpg
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Scott Foster
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Rose Lee wrote:Hi Scott,

I was one of those lurkers who was inspired by this OP. Back in fall 2013 I contacted Cornell University and requested seeds. I stratified 10? seeds in my refrigerator that winter, but after that I'm ashamed to say I pretty much did everything possible to try to destroy them. I left the sprouted seeds in the care of my sister's ex-boyfriend while I lived abroad for a year. When I returned, I planted the coddled seedlings with no protection on property with a resident deer herd. I thought they were definitely goners, as the deer ate them down to nubs. However, they were back again the next two years for a new level of abuse - droughty summers with no irrigation (remember the 50+ days of no rain, PNWers?). I was again out of the country for a month, and left the poor seedlings to fend for themselves. As of August 2017 they were still surviving! Unfortunately I forgot to take pics before the leaves fell off, but I did find these pics from 2014, when they were still in pots.

The rest of the seeds (they sent me a 'small' sampling of 100!) have been in my refrigerator for 4 years. I'm going to stratify some this winter, to hopefully sprout in spring, but I've learned since then that refrigerators really aren't the best place to keep seeds, so we'll see. I'll keep you posted on the seeds and the seedlings come spring.



Rose Lee,  Thanks for the information.  Sounds like a thumbs up for hardiness.  Keep me posted.
 
Rose Lee
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This is the best of the 5 malus sieversii, about waist high. I must have mistaken it for another kind of tree before, but now that they are budding out it definitely is the same as the other 4.

So amazing to see a completely natural, ungrafted growth habit on a fruit tree! I can't wait to see it leaf out this year...I wonder when it will have blooms?

IMG-20180327-WA0001.jpg
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Robust Malus Sieversii
 
Rose Lee
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I stratified 16 more seeds this year, but I left them in the back of the fridge and they froze! (I couldn't even open the paper towel they were in.) I thought I had killed them, but so far, 5/16 seeds have radicles!
20180327_190804.jpg
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Malus Radicles
 
Scott Foster
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Rose Lee wrote:I stratified 16 more seeds this year, but I left them in the back of the fridge and they froze! (I couldn't even open the paper towel they were in.) I thought I had killed them, but so far, 5/16 seeds have radicles!




Nice!   I didn't end up getting any of these seeds.  We did an orchard run this year and I stratified fifteen seeds in the fridge.  13 of the seeds are on their second set of leaves.  Couldn't believe how easy apple seeds sprouted.  I did two other types of fruit with no luck so far.
 
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