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Extreme direct seeding? (Tomatoes peppers eggplant etc) + squash

 
Angelika Maier
Posts: 798
Location: cool climate, Blue Mountains, Australia
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My tomato plants raised on the windowsill don't transition very well in the open. Yes I do keep them in the shade for a week or so before planting.
I always looks at these gourgeous seedlings they sell at nurseries.....
I wonder about direct seeding of tomatoes, eggplant, peppers groundcherries and the like. Has anyonbe tried that?
On the other hand I wonder if I presprout pumkin inside so that the pumkin/squash is past the yummy state for mice - did anyone try this?
And melons?
 
Joseph Lofthouse
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Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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In my garden, the season is not long enough to grow tomatoes, eggplant, and peppers from seed. Groundcherries are a weed. I suspect that it sprouts from last year's roots, but some seeds are likely to grow sometimes too.

Pumpkins and squash seem particularly susceptible in my garden to transplant shock, so I always direct seed them. But if the transplant shock is less traumatic to the plant than the mice, then it seems like a good strategy;
 
Rick English
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Location: Central Pennsylvania, USA
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Here is a long post that paul started as a challenge for growing tomatoes from seed indoors vs. direct sow - lots of good reads in here:
http://www.permies.com/t/34777/plants/tomato-transplant-seed

And here is an earlier post about the same topic:
http://www.permies.com/t/3500/plants/tomato-experiment-transplant-direct-seed

In my neck of the woods, I get lots of volunteer tomatoes, mostly because I leave a lot of ripe less-than-perfect tomatoes laying around my gardens. If the volunteers come up in a good spot, they seem to do as well or better than the ones I plant as seed indoor and then transplant outside.

I get the same results with spaghetti squash. In both cases, the seeds that mother nature plants do better than the seeds I direct plant.
 
chip sanft
Posts: 354
Location: 18 acres & heart in zone 4 (central MN). Current abode: Knoxville (zone 6 /7)
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We direct seed tomatoes, squash, and other things. Some things we're just working up: peppers and okra. Sometimes we do transplant sprouts, too, but we have a long enough growing season that its not a requirement. We also get lots of volunteer tomatoes. Never had the slightest luck with aubergine.

Since we save and plant our own seed, we have plenty and just do lots and lots of it. The success rate seems to be lower than one might otherwise achieve, but the ones that take are strong and tend to produce. I think it'd be easy to experiment: just go to the farmers' market and buy some examples you like and plant those seeds and see what happens. It can't hurt and wouldn't cost much.
 
Angelika Maier
Posts: 798
Location: cool climate, Blue Mountains, Australia
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Thanks for the link, it was an interesting read! It seems that the transplants outperformed direct seeded tomatoes. I had bad experiences with volunteers. Thousands of thousands TINY fruit.
 
Rebecca Norman
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Location: Ladakh, Indian Himalayas at 10,500 feet, zone 5
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We started using these little tunnel greenhouses for greens in the winter the past two years. They've been very productive. In the spring when they get warm, we pull some greens and direct seed cucurbits in the last line at the edge of the group of greenhouses. When they get too hot we remove the plastic for the summer, pull the last bolted greens, and let the cucurbits sprawl. We had butternut squash, bottle gourd, cucumbers, some kind of brightly colored little Indian squash or pumpkins, and zucchinis (the zukes and butternuts are new and exotic around here).
Tunnel greenhouse at SECMOL.JPG
[Thumbnail for Tunnel greenhouse at SECMOL.JPG]
 
Ken W Wilson
Posts: 385
Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
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I have two types of cherry tomatoes that have self seeded for about 8 years. I'm pretty sure one is Garden Delight and the other Tommie Toe. The Tommie Toe is better. It's a much smaller plant than the original, but I don't give them much care at all. No staking or fertizer. Just pick a few plants that come up in convenient spots and keep them weeded. They more than productive enough. I also have a strain of Crimson Sweet watermelon that is semiwild. I've been growing it for about ten years and saving seeds from volunteer plants as much as possible. They come up at the right time and have plenty of time to mature. The melons are getting pretty inbred though, so not sure what they'll do next. They're bigger and have harder,slower germinating seeds so far. Weathers been terrible the last two years. I need a more typical year to reevaluate them.

Sorry if I got too off topic.
 
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