• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

This is a bean, but which one?

 
André Troylilas
Posts: 130
Location: North of France
4
bee bike forest garden
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi,

I love growing and eating beans.
This year, I grew maybe 50 different cultivars in something like 13 species.
I carefully labelled everything while sowing, and transplanting.
Unfortunately, while plants grew, they met each other, and now it's kind of a big mess.
I will have to do things in a different way next year.
And I was given beans without a name from Aster Lane Edibles, so that I don't know each and every specie/cultivar I grow.

I'm now getting some crop and... of course I sometimes wonder what I have.

Yesterday, I found a dead dwarf bean plant with beans on it that didn't look like its neighbours.
So... What do you think they are (because I don't know):
  • Phaseolus coccineus
  • Phaseolus lunatus
  • Canavalia
  • Psophocarpus
  • Mucuna
  • Vicia
  • Phaseolus vulgaris
  • Dolichos
  • Vigna angularis
  • Vigna unguiculata
  • Vigna unguiculata sesquipedalis


  • To me, that can't be any canavalia or psophocarpus because it's too small. I don't think it's Phaseolus coccineus either, because the shape doesn't seem the right one (and the size neither), not Vicia because of the leaves (didn't take any pic because they were rotten, but looked like bean leaves).
    Could that be a cow pea? Maybe not, because the "eye" is white and not black...

    Thanks.
    IMG_20160829_114644-1-.jpg
    [Thumbnail for IMG_20160829_114644-1-.jpg]
    IMG_20160829_114650-1-.jpg
    [Thumbnail for IMG_20160829_114650-1-.jpg]
     
    David Livingston
    master steward
    Posts: 2991
    Location: Anjou ,France
    140
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    no idea but they look nice and I would like to grow some .
     
    André Troylilas
    Posts: 130
    Location: North of France
    4
    bee bike forest garden
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Thanks David.
    If I find some more on my allotments, they will find their way to your land.
     
    Anne Miller
    pollinator
    Posts: 499
    Location: USDA Zone 8a
    32
    bee dog food preservation greening the desert hunting toxin-ectomy
    • Likes 1
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    My first thought is that they were Field Peas, not cowpeas but pisum sativum.  But they didn't look right.

    They are Pink Beans:  Popular in Caribbean countries, pink beans, or habichuelas rosadas, are similar in size to pinto and Great Northern beans and have a rich, meaty flavor.


    Beans


    pink-beans/
     
    Joseph Lofthouse
    garden master
    Posts: 1991
    Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
    366
    bee chicken food preservation fungi greening the desert
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator

    They look like Phaseolus vulgaris to me. Especially if that mouse pad is calibrated in cm.

     
    André Troylilas
    Posts: 130
    Location: North of France
    4
    bee bike forest garden
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Thanks Anne, I didn't know of pink beans.
    So, we can't call that a cultivar of Phaseolus vulgaris, but is it a sub-specie?
    What I can see there is helping a little.

    Thanks Joseph, it's a graph paper (mm/cm).
     
    Anne Miller
    pollinator
    Posts: 499
    Location: USDA Zone 8a
    32
    bee dog food preservation greening the desert hunting toxin-ectomy
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Joseph knows more about beans than I do so it probably is a Phaseolus vulgaris.  I wonder about that but didn't want to get out my seeds to look at them.  I don't know much about pink beans.

    I planted pinto beans this year that looked nothing like the parents. The parent Pinto beans are brown with white spots.  The children were smaller white with brown spots.
     
    Joseph Lofthouse
    garden master
    Posts: 1991
    Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
    366
    bee chicken food preservation fungi greening the desert
    • Likes 2
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Common beans, (phaseolus vulgaris), and runner beans (Phaseolus coccineus) are the only pulses I've grown that have a glossy seed coat. The seeds in the original post are not at all like runner beans seeds. The seed size is consistent with common beans. The hilum looks consistent with a common bean. A bush plant is consistent with some cultivars of common bean. Therefore I'd ID them as common beans.

    I grow hundreds of cultivars of common beans ... I stopped trying to keep track of names a long time ago. These days I just describe the characteristics of the seed. Pink beans, or little pink beans, or great pink beans, or yellow beans, or little black beans, etc, etc, etc... I use a handful of colors, and a dozen or so patterns/shapes: Appaloosa, speckled, calypso, kidney, round, cattle, crowder, Anasazi, tiger eye, goat's eye, etc.

    Common beans:



     
    André Troylilas
    Posts: 130
    Location: North of France
    4
    bee bike forest garden
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    I see, Joseph. Thanks a bunch for the info.
    I try to keep track of what I'm growing, and as much as I like seeds as a gift, I like to be able to name them afterwards, or at least to know the binomial name.
    Illusory quest, but I can't help it for the time being.
    Will store it under the hand-wrought
    Phaseolus vulgaris 'durango/pink'
    neologism.

    Thanks a lot for your help.
     
    Joseph Lofthouse
    garden master
    Posts: 1991
    Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
    366
    bee chicken food preservation fungi greening the desert
    • Likes 1
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    I've always been more of a lumper than a splitter. I'm watching closely for interspecies bean hybrids between Phaseolus vulgaris and Phaseolus coccineus. And the past couple of years I've been growing hybrids between Cucurbita moschata and Cucurbita argyrosperma. Next growing season, I'm expecting to add an interspecies hybrid between Cucurbita maxima and  Cucurbita moschata.
     
    André Troylilas
    Posts: 130
    Location: North of France
    4
    bee bike forest garden
    • Likes 1
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Thanks, Joseph.
    This is the "crop" of the day.
    I guess they all are Phaseolus vulgaris. All plants were dwarf.
    1_1.png
    [Thumbnail for 1_1.png]
    1_2.png
    [Thumbnail for 1_2.png]
    2_1.png
    [Thumbnail for 2_1.png]
     
    André Troylilas
    Posts: 130
    Location: North of France
    4
    bee bike forest garden
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    I particularly like the skewbald themed one.
    2_2.png
    [Thumbnail for 2_2.png]
    3_1.png
    [Thumbnail for 3_1.png]
    3_2.png
    [Thumbnail for 3_2.png]
     
    André Troylilas
    Posts: 130
    Location: North of France
    4
    bee bike forest garden
    • Likes 1
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    The last one looks funny.
    4_1.png
    [Thumbnail for 4_1.png]
    4_2.png
    [Thumbnail for 4_2.png]
    5_1.png
    [Thumbnail for 5_1.png]
     
    André Troylilas
    Posts: 130
    Location: North of France
    4
    bee bike forest garden
    • Likes 1
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    I guess the very last one is an immature one, not a different cultivar...
    5_2.png
    [Thumbnail for 5_2.png]
    6_1.png
    [Thumbnail for 6_1.png]
    6_2.png
    [Thumbnail for 6_2.png]
     
    Joseph Lofthouse
    garden master
    Posts: 1991
    Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
    366
    bee chicken food preservation fungi greening the desert
    • Likes 1
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    André:

    Great bean photos! They look like Phaseolus vulgaris to me as well. Common beans sometimes have what I think of as a "reversal" where the seed coloration is inverted from the normal pattern. So instead of having brown speckles on a beige background (for example with pinto beans), the pattern will be beige speckles on a brown background. I'm wondering if your dark speckled beans and the white bean with red speckles are the same variety and some of the seeds are showing the "color reversal"?

    Yesterday I harvested  the earliest of Phaseolus acutifolius.
    0831161847-00.jpg
    [Thumbnail for 0831161847-00.jpg]
    Tepary Beans: Phaseolus acutifolius
     
    André Troylilas
    Posts: 130
    Location: North of France
    4
    bee bike forest garden
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Thanks.
    I got your point, but can't give a ruling on these beans.

    Phaseolus acutifolius is one of the maaaaaany "bean" species/cultivars/whatever I want to try next year.
    I've just spotted one cultivar at rare seed that I'd like to buy: "Blue Speckled".
    If you ever know of a seller with more choice, please let me know.
     
    André Troylilas
    Posts: 130
    Location: North of France
    4
    bee bike forest garden
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Received today "San Pablo balleza", yellow tepari beans, red and brown bambara groundnut.
     
    Shawn Harper
    Posts: 360
    Location: Portlandia, Oregon
    7
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Joseph Lofthouse wrote:André:

    Common beans sometimes have what I think of as a "reversal" where the seed coloration is inverted from the normal pattern. So instead of having brown speckles on a beige background (for example with pinto beans), the pattern will be beige speckles on a brown background.

    Yesterday I harvested  the earliest of Phaseolus acutifolius.


    I noticed this on some of mine. Do you think it is a weird quirk or possibly something that could be bred to be consistant?
     
    Joseph Lofthouse
    garden master
    Posts: 1991
    Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
    366
    bee chicken food preservation fungi greening the desert
    • Likes 1
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Shawn Harper wrote:I noticed this on some of mine. Do you think it is a weird quirk or possibly something that could be bred to be consistant?


    The trait doesn't seem to be heritable... By that I mean that if I plant "reversed color" beans that they produce regular colored offspring.
     
    André Troylilas
    Posts: 130
    Location: North of France
    4
    bee bike forest garden
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Regarding mixing beans in garden beds, I don't care as long as I can remember what to do with them.
    The problem is see is that some of them are better for some recipes, and some others with other recipes (like pink beans vs flageolets).
     
    Zachary Fellows
    Posts: 4
    Location: Greenfield, United States
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Hi,
         Just a guess but they look like mung beans.
     
    André Troylilas
    Posts: 130
    Location: North of France
    4
    bee bike forest garden
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    New (to me) cultivars spotted. The pinkish ones were really a beautiful pink color before freezing.
    By the way, I may have made a mistake.
    I usually freeze my dry beans before storage to avoid damage by Bruchus.
    I think that this time I may have frozen them too early.
    My bad...
    IMG_20160912_154818.jpg
    [Thumbnail for IMG_20160912_154818.jpg]
    Crop of the day
     
    André Troylilas
    Posts: 130
    Location: North of France
    4
    bee bike forest garden
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    The big round red one could be Phaseolus vulgaris 'true red cranberry dry bean'.
    I don't know in which category this one can be classified, but as long as I don't have enough of this to eat, I don't really care.

    The other one could come from Carol Deppe, but I still have to find its name:


    And the "skewbald" one is maybe a Calypso:
     
    André Troylilas
    Posts: 130
    Location: North of France
    4
    bee bike forest garden
    • Likes 2
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Crop of the day.
    Maybe Calypso/Ying yan/Taiji bean.
    calypso_1.png
    [Thumbnail for calypso_1.png]
    calypso_2.png
    [Thumbnail for calypso_2.png]
     
    André Troylilas
    Posts: 130
    Location: North of France
    4
    bee bike forest garden
    • Likes 1
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    And another unknown one.
    unknown_1.png
    [Thumbnail for unknown_1.png]
    unknown_2.png
    [Thumbnail for unknown_2.png]
     
    André Troylilas
    Posts: 130
    Location: North of France
    4
    bee bike forest garden
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Sabre de Vienne, Orteils de Prêcheur, Espagne Rouge.
    groupe_picture.png
    [Thumbnail for groupe_picture.png]
     
    2017 Permaculture Design Course at Wheaton Labs
    http://richsoil.com/pdc
    • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
    • New Topic
    Boost this thread!