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Tomato Breeding - F1 hybrid Habrochaites Grow Journal

 
Karl Trepka
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Hi

I have been breeding/cross pollinating my favorite tomato varieties for about 5 years now.

My general philosophy is wanting a more robust plant with my opinion of most heirloom varieties as tasting great but they are big sooks with disease/vigor issues.

My analogy is if you inbreed for hundreds of years it will inevitably look like the royal family, no offence intended.

So when i saw the S. Habrochaites in Joseph’s post (Auto-Hybridizing Tomatoes) i knew i had to get those genetics.

With a lot of luck i have got some F1 hybrid Habrochaites here in Australia and despite the late nature of the season grew out a few to confirm a number of factors.

Due to the enormous difficulties we have in Australia in obtaining plant material i’m “paying it forward” and offering both surplus seeds and plant material to permies in OZ for FREE.

I will have Prunings ready very soon which i expect would root readily if given half a chance....just message me your address
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So on with the pics of my babies.
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20th dec 2017 100% germination
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27 Dec 2017 leaves look normal so far
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9 Jan 2017 looks like Habrochaites type leaves
 
Karl Trepka
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more pics
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12 Jan 2017 transplanted - serrated leave now pronounced
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21 Jan 2017 about a month old and growing well
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21 Jan 2017 flowers developing
 
Joseph Lofthouse
garden master
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Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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Karl: Great work! I love the leaves of Solanum habrochaites. I look forward to ongoing updates about this project.
 
Ellie Strand
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Location: Eau Claire, WI
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Very interesting posts.

Curious about the two plants, I Googled and found this long and detailed article comparing and contrasting cold tolerances in the wild and domesticated tomato.
http://bmcplantbiol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12870-015-0521-6

I formerly worked as a nurse practitioner and always disliked reviewing research that was done to prove something obvious to me and others. (However, basic science is desperately needed in all areas for just this. Sometimes the common wisdom is in error, as seen in the recent "discovery" that the normal human temperature is NOT 98.6 degrees. It was arbitrarily marked thus during manufacture of the first thermometers.)  javascript:emoticon('');

But I digress. After all that intense tomato genetic investigation and pages of charts and diagrams, this is the final sentence in the discussion portion of the paper:
                            "Thus, differences in cold regulatory mechanisms may contribute to the differences in cold tolerance of these two tomato species." SMH

Anyway, I am following this work with great interest.
 
Karl Trepka
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Hi Ellie

that a so scary/funny about body temperature .....over the years the more i look the more i find many of our truths are based on convenience, assumptions or what benefits that person at the time. talking about health i dare you to look up the mg/kg of vitamin c recommended for guinea pigs then work out what that would translate for a human ............i think you will be shocked.

i have herd that atherosclerosis could be sub clinical scurvy with the body trying to repair the tissue (collagen) damage the deficiency causes.

i too digress

population genetics is a funny thing..........as a whole a plant/animal may or may not show a wide spread trait until "selection" is performed. take pesticide resistance in insects 99% could be kill by the spray..........not particularly resistant as a population/species..........what really saved that 1% was the diversity of genes to allow all the ducks to line up in just the right way.

one of my favorite sayings is ... infinite combinations, infinite possibilities

so the trick is to have the diversity to draw from for it to work.


 
Ellie Strand
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Location: Eau Claire, WI
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Definitely agree, Karl. The longer I am a medical "insider" the more I find myself switching to natural remedies like herbs and essential oils. But I don't need to elevate my cortisol levels by continuing in this vein. 

I'm 65 next month and moving from 16 straw bales last summer to biointensive, except for two (8' and 13') hugelkultur beds, this spring. That's enough to keep me occupied. Although I would be right there breeding a better OP tomato with you even 10 years ago, I think younger folks should have the opportunity.
 
Nick alevras
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Hi Karl

Great work will they survive the colder months or do they wilt like normal tomatoes
 
Karl Trepka
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Hi

i'm not sure but the but the pure breed Habrochaites can take frost. i have them in pots so i can put in a sunny spot over winter to test them out.
 
Joseph Lofthouse
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Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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Nick alevras wrote:Great work will they survive the colder months or do they wilt like normal tomatoes


I estimate that the cold hardiness of Solanum habrochaites is in the neighborhood of 25 F. Last spring/fall, my plants survived a number of snow storms. That's warm snow, which is different to me than snow on the ground followed by strong radiant cooling. If I were making a hardiness scale, it would look like this:

Tomato --> S. Habrochaites --> Tomatillo --> Cape Gooseberry

With each species being more frost tolerant than the previous.



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Testing Tomatoes and close relatives for cold/frost tolerance.
 
Karl Trepka
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amazing stuff!............i find my toms are pretty much dead/non productive before the frost hits them........the cold damp conditions just turns the leaves to mush.
 
Andrew Barney
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Location: Northern Colorado
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Just Saying hi. I've got some S. habrochaites seeds for this years tomato experiments. I grew Josephs WildX5 last year which may have had S. habrochaites ancestry or another wild tomato ancestor. It was an interesting tomato.

I've got some S. cheesmaniae and S. galapagense seedlings started. Lokking forward to working with some of the wild tomato genetics.

Been following Joseph's experiments for years, including his Frost tolerance trials and his auto-hybridizing project. The original thread with the frost tolerance trials has been quite interesting over on the Alan Bishop Homegrown Goodness Plant Breeding Forum. Joseph also shares tomato stuff on the Tomatoville forum as well.

Looking forward to some better tomato varieties in the near future! It only took us a century or two to realize how inbred and bottlenecked our tomato crops had finally become...
 
Karl Trepka
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sounds great i will have some more pics/updates soon
 
Andrew Barney
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Ok. Update time for me. Sorry, not trying to hijack your thread, but this seems like the closest one to tag along with. Just seedlings right now, but my test seedlings for this year are getting bigger and are doing well.



The Solanum cheesmaniae ones show some variation, both in terms of antho stems vs. non-antho stems, but also in smell and what might be disease/bug susceptibility. Still all very interesting though. SC LA0422



There is one tall but more yellowish plant in the S. cheesmaniae batch. This is one of the two that lack antho coloring. This is also the one that smells slightly lemony. I'll be honest in saying that the slight lemony smell slightly bugs me. This is also the plant that is showing bug and/or disease susceptibility on the leaves (might be aphids). But this one is now showing early flowering in the 6th and maybe the 4th node.. so that's interesting. I'm more interested in the antho stem ones, but i wont kill it off. I'll keep watching it. Might be interesting. The others have leaves and smell similar to domestic tomatoes.



The Solanum galapagense have very interesting leaves. I really like them! Plus something interesting is that they have no smell! Not even traditional tomato leaf smell. So that's way cool! Very interesting. Excited for these. SG LA0317





A few S. habrochaites seedlings as well. And an early Wx5 plant trimmed bonzai style with 4 tomatoes already.
 
Karl Trepka
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looks great i assume its just warming up over there as its getting to the end of the season here.

my fruit is about the same size.

 
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