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fruit tree prunings

 
Posts: 7
Location: willamette valley, oregon
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Is it ok to leave fruit tree prunings on the ground around the tree that the prunings came from?  I don't have a chipper, sometimes I use loppers to cut them into smaller pieces, but by no means are they "chips". I group them under the tree (in my "walkway" that I use when accessing the interior of the tree, in other places under the tree I have groundcover plants).  I was hoping eventually they will break down and provide the conditions that trees like (I can never remember if bacterial or fungal, I just remember wood chips).  Someone told me that leaving the prunings would create the condition for pests to overwinter, so now I wonder what I should do.  I have apple, pear, prune trees.  Thanks
 
pollinator
Posts: 1793
Location: Wisconsin, zone 4
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I do that in lots of areas.  I haven't seen any drawbacks to it.  They will just break down more slowly than chips, but they will still turn into great soil.
 
gardener
Posts: 6274
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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The only time I would remove those would be if there was some disease or insects were present that could become an issue.
Other than those times, it is prudent to let the tree trimmings become nourishment for the tree. The smaller you can make the pieces, the faster they will rot and go back into the soil.

Redhawk
 
Posts: 520
Location: Northern Germany (Zone 8a)
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what about selling apple-tree pruning on craigslist or something? somewhere in the forums someone sold them to people who smoke stuff
 
gardener
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Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
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I feed them to the bunnies,who strip them of bark,twigs ,and leaves.
Then I use them to smoke pork.
 
steward
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Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
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I used them as pea trellis sticks.  I put a beefy stake every 8' down the row, stuck an apple pruning twig in the ground about every 3 inches along the row and then ran some wire/twine down either side of the twigs (from stake to stake) to help hold the twigs upright as the peas grew heavy.
 
J Blair
Posts: 7
Location: willamette valley, oregon
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great ideas, thanks everyone
 
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