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My solar deep well pumping system  RSS feed

 
Posts: 264
Location: SW Missouri
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I made a video of my deep well water pumping system. Enjoy!


 
Posts: 80
Location: Nomadic
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Eric. Wow, that's a nice deep well! Why did you go almost 300 ft beyond the water level. Sounds expensive. But good water is priceless. Good idea to measure the water level. Those SQ Flex pumps sound really good design. Thanks for the video.
 
Eric Hammond
Posts: 264
Location: SW Missouri
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Hey Jeremy, It's common practice for the well drillers around here to drill until 30 gpm is reached. A lot of off the shelf 240v A.C. pumps are 25 gallons per minute and it works good for that. If I were to sell out or pass away, they next people to own the property would most likely not be as crazy as I am haha.  The well was quite expensive. There is 80 feet of steel casing grouted in the bedrock to prevent and shallow waters from contaminating the deep aquifer. That combined with drilling made for about a 5000 dollar hole.  Funny thing is I never experimented with rain water catchment until AFTER the well was drilled. When I had the hand pump and realized how much work it was to pump water by hand for all the animals, i started catching rainwater. I had no idea how much water was just falling out of the sky.  I have a shed that's about 12 ft by 8 ft on one side of the roof, in one inch of rain I could catch over 100 gallons of water, pretty amazing.....well my shop is 40 ft by 50 ft and I estimate in 1 inch of rain I could catch 5000 gallons of water. It rains 43 inches a year here. With a couple large storage tanks I could satisfy my entire water supply with rain water.  Live and learn.

The state of missouri doesnt recommend drinking the shallow waters that you hit at less then 80 feet because it could be contaminated.  There is an old man around the corner from me that is 97 and still getting around great, he dug his well by hand in the 1950s. His wife would lower him down in the hole and would hoist the dirt and him back up. When he hit rock, at that time you could buy dynamite at the hardware store. He dug until water was pouring in faster then you could dig.  He cased the well by stacking concrete culverts end on end to the top of the hole.  If anyone but him drinks that water, it does make you feel kind of ill. But, I reckon it's nothing that your body can't get used to, and doesn't seem to affect the longevity of your life. He still drives and fixes clocks for people.  His wife just recently died. She was up the in age too.
 
Jeremy Baker
Posts: 80
Location: Nomadic
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Eric, That's interesting. Nice work. Trick water system. One can't help wonder what one is drinking no matter the source. Id love to try some of that deep water if you can beam some over. The old timer neighbor sounds great. Men of steel eh. Better than Men of Arsenic haha. Here the basic water test is free but the one that tests for heavy metals, chemicals, etc costs. Something affected me on my old farm. I don't know what. Could have been black mold. The shallow well. Chemicals. Excess iron. Or a combination. I sweated it out at last.
That is impressive rain catchment figures. I'd use it for irrigation, toilet, and ponds and well water for domestic. Too much bird poop for my germaphobe sens abilities. Also roofs are covered in stuff from air pollution.
  I could see getting a bigger tank for the well water and a big one for rain water. Hey, have you considered a 'natural swimming pond'? I built one and it was my favorite project on my permaculture site. Do you have any clay on the land? How does it drain? Enjoy
 
pollinator
Posts: 135
Location: Penticton, Canada
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Hi Eric,  Great job on the video. Very informative!
A few questions:
In our campground we have an ac well pump that is run by a generator. It fills 2, 150 gallon tanks. That water is then used by a small bathroom house that has 2 showers 2 flush toilets and 2 vanity sinks. The height of the tanks are only about 5-6 feet above the height of the bathroom house so no help from gravity to produce any measurable pressure. Our pressure instead is supplied by a dc 12v shurflo pump used in RV's. Every time we turn on the water though, the pump has to kick on which ends up being a lot of on/off cycles and has burnt out the switch several times now.
My question is: 1) if I were to add a pressure tank (about the size of the one you have in the video), would the shurflo pump be able to pressurize the tank to help minimize the on/off cycling?
As you probably know, the shurflo pump has an adjustment screw to increase/decrease the pressure sensitivity but I'm not sure if this would be enough to control the pressure tank properly?

A few more details: We originally had 2, 3000 gallon tanks on a hill which provided enough pressure to run our bathroom house. The well is no longer producing near as much water anymore and it takes forever to get the water pumped way up there and having to listen to the generator for like 6 hours a day, we came up with the shurflo solution described above.
Perhaps one day when the ac pump dies, we'll replace it with an AC/DC pump like the one you have but for now just trying to get by until that day comes.  
Any help would be appreciated.
 
Posts: 147
Location: North central Ontario
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Gerry Parent wrote:Hi Eric,  Great job on the video. Very informative!
A few questions:
In our campground we have an ac well pump that is run by a generator. It fills 2, 150 gallon tanks. That water is then used by a small bathroom house that has 2 showers 2 flush toilets and 2 vanity sinks. The height of the tanks are only about 5-6 feet above the height of the bathroom house so no help from gravity to produce any measurable pressure. Our pressure instead is supplied by a dc 12v shurflo pump used in RV's. Every time we turn on the water though, the pump has to kick on which ends up being a lot of on/off cycles and has burnt out the switch several times now.
My question is: 1) if I were to add a pressure tank (about the size of the one you have in the video), would the shurflo pump be able to pressurize the tank to help minimize the on/off cycling?
As you probably know, the shurflo pump has an adjustment screw to increase/decrease the pressure sensitivity but I'm not sure if this would be enough to control the pressure tank properly?

A few more details: We originally had 2, 3000 gallon tanks on a hill which provided enough pressure to run our bathroom house. The well is no longer producing near as much water anymore and it takes forever to get the water pumped way up there and having to listen to the generator for like 6 hours a day, we came up with the shurflo solution described above.
Perhaps one day when the ac pump dies, we'll replace it with an AC/DC pump like the one you have but for now just trying to get by until that day comes.  
Any help would be appreciated.


hi Gerry, in case Eric doesn't answer you we ran our house using a system similar to what you describe for 4 years. Adding a 5 gallon pressure tank inline with the shurflo will reduce the frequent start stops that burn out the switch. Usually it's the slow flow of the toilet or a slow tap that does it as the pump catches up too fast and cycles continuously. Adjust the pressure on the tank to be more in line to the pressure of the pump though as it's usually lower then your typical jet pump.
Cheers,  David
 
Gerry Parent
pollinator
Posts: 135
Location: Penticton, Canada
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Thank you for your quick response David. I forgot to mention that we also have a reverse osmosis unit hooked up which like the toilet, also causes the cycling and wearing out the switch faster. I have since adjusted the pumps pressure adjuster so it either stays on or goes off under low flow conditions.

"Adjust the pressure on the tank to be more in line to the pressure of the pump though as it's usually lower then your typical jet pump."
Do you mean to adjust the pressure of the tank by the air valve at the top? I think they are factory set at about 28 psi.
This is not a jet pump. Here is the link shurflo pump
Shutoff 55 psi, start 40 psi. What would I have to set the air in the tank to equal the pumps output?
 
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