• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies living kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • raven ranson
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Julia Winter
garden masters:
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • thomas rubino
  • Bill Crim
  • Kim Goodwin
  • Joylynn Hardesty
gardeners:
  • Amit Enventres
  • Mike Jay
  • Dan Boone

Tree tubes  RSS feed

 
Posts: 5
Location: Zone 7a NJ
trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I want to plant some young bareroot trees this year- hammamelis virginiana, cercis canadensis, and either nyssa slyvatica or an amelanchar species. Mostly shrubby multistemmed plants. We have a lot of deer and rodents around. I was looking at the pros/cons and dimension of the tree tubes. I could make 6ft "tubes" out of 2ft 1/4" hardware cloth and stake them with 1/2" pvc conduit for less than the tree tubes. That would prevent the deer from eating them and the rodents from chewing their way in. The 2ft will roll into about 7-1/2" diameter tube. I guess it wont have the greenhouse effect of the plastic tube but i read some studies that show total stem mass between open grown and tree tube grown is the same anyway. Are there any obvious reasons I shouldnt do this and just use the tubes?
 
gardener
Posts: 2149
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
373
books food preservation hunting solar trees woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It's worth a shot.  Is there a chance the twigs will start to grow through the mesh?  If so you'll have to keep poking them back in from time to time.
 
gardener
Posts: 4886
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
563
books chicken dog duck fish forest garden fungi homestead hugelkultur hunting pig
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
There isn't any reason the hardware cloth won't work, just be sure to stake on at least two sides so it will definitely stay where you put it.
The plastic ones are more for easy mfg. and they might help a bit with a late frost event, other than that, there aren't really any specific reasons to use plastic.

Redhawk
 
gardener
Posts: 825
Location: Olympia, WA - Zone 8a/b
292
bike books forest garden fungi homestead hugelkultur kids trees
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have used thousands of tubes for my restoration projects and now I'm shifting away from them due to the cost of purchasing them, the issue of getting them to stay put, and the garbage resulting from them.

I had a lot of issues with hard ground combined with wind resulting in the tubes getting messed up. If you are going to use them make sure they are very well secured otherwise they are not worth it.

I use mesh tubes for deer protection - the solid plastic ones are more aimed at protecting against rodents.

For the mesh ones you need to make sure the top of the tree is fully protected. Often this means raising the mesh tubes up about once a year until the top of the tree is above browse height.

For my restoration work I'm shifting to what I call forest islands - circles 30 to 60 feet across. I prep these circles, apply a full layer of mulch, and plant heavily. I'm now looking at installing temp deer fences around each circle that would remain for about 3 years. After 3 years I would remove the fence to use it for a different project.

These fences are cheaper then the tree protectors on a per plant basis.

Not sure if this would be an option for your project but I'm finding the fence is a better option for my projects than the protectors. I'm currently designing a 5 acre restoration project with about 6k plants that will use this method.
 
pollinator
Posts: 1606
113
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Nice advice daron. Im looking at about 30 trees, all with 3 tposts and a 6ft diameter of remesh around each tree. I often think that one fence encompassing the whole "island" of trees would make more sense.

In other areas im using a scattered approach. Maybe one tree every 100 yards. This would have to remain the same.
 
Gilbert Byrnes
Posts: 5
Location: Zone 7a NJ
trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Wow Darron, thats a lot of planting and land. I dont have that much property to deal with, Im in a suburban type area with 0.8 acre and have to be kind of sensitive toward my neighbors and the township permit deptartment. The back of my lot is kind of wooded, and Id like to expand that a little and improve the mix of species present. We are planning to fence in the whole yard in a year or two, but i think for the 15 or so tree im planning, individual cages will work.
 
pollinator
Posts: 484
Location: Virginia USDA 7a/b
60
bee chicken food preservation forest garden hugelkultur hunting
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Gilbert,

Your plight inspired me. Interesting to read Daron's take. I planted somewhere around 600 trees in the last year, mixed tube and no tube. Survival rate remains to be totalled but pretty good each side. For the species you are interested in I had amelancier of three varieties. Downy didn't care wouldn't waste a tube. They grew super fast anyhow. Canadensis really liked the tubes, almost double the height in tubes and clearly more wood mass. I don't have nyssa sylvatica but I have the white tupelo (better bee forage) and it seems to love the humidity of the tubes, it's a riparian species.

The other thing is that I deep mulch around the tubes, which gives air space around the trunk but provides a much better soil prep in the area they will eventually root. The ones I could not do this had much more weed/grass pressure in their "donut", which is what I think the elevated growth in the tubes may be related to as well.
 
Gilbert Byrnes
Posts: 5
Location: Zone 7a NJ
trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Daron Williams wrote:I have used thousands of tubes for my restoration projects and now I'm shifting away from them due to the cost of purchasing them, the issue of getting them to stay put, and the garbage resulting from them.

I had a lot of issues with hard ground combined with wind resulting in the tubes getting messed up. If you are going to use them make sure they are very well secured otherwise they are not worth it.

I use mesh tubes for deer protection - the solid plastic ones are more aimed at protecting against rodents.

For the mesh ones you need to make sure the top of the tree is fully protected. Often this means raising the mesh tubes up about once a year until the top of the tree is above browse height.

For my restoration work I'm shifting to what I call forest islands - circles 30 to 60 feet across. I prep these circles, apply a full layer of mulch, and plant heavily. I'm now looking at installing temp deer fences around each circle that would remain for about 3 years. After 3 years I would remove the fence to use it for a different project.

These fences are cheaper then the tree protectors on a per plant basis.

Not sure if this would be an option for your project but I'm finding the fence is a better option for my projects than the protectors. I'm currently designing a 5 acre restoration project with about 6k plants that will use this method.



Hi did you decide on what type of temp deer fence you are going to use for your islands? What height? Thanks
 
expectation is the root of all heartache - shakespeare. tiny ad:
Permaculture Voices 1 - Purchase All the Video Here!
https://permies.com/wiki/pv1
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!