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Need help identifying these berries

 
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When I was younger, my friend's grandmother gave me some of red berries. Soon, they become my favourite fruit. Sadly, I do not know the name, nor could I find them at any grocery store. They are not toxic as I have eaten them every summer for years, but the only place I could find them is on some wild trees around my neighbourhood.

I have attached some photos of the tree and the berries. If someone could help me identify these berries, I would the so grateful! Thank you in advance!

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gardener
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Any chance you can get a close-up of one of the branches and leaf sets? Also maybe cut one of the berries in half to see the interior. Given their size in the second picture and the way the leaf shape/appearance seems in it, my initial thought is some form of crab-apple.
 
gardener
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It looks to me like it may some sort of hawberries (hawthorn) or Mt. Ash, but I can't tell
 
Angela Qi
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D. Logan wrote:Any chance you can get a close-up of one of the branches and leaf sets? Also maybe cut one of the berries in half to see the interior. Given their size in the second picture and the way the leaf shape/appearance seems in it, my initial thought is some form of crab-apple.



Hi! Thanks for the response! I think the picture I took distorts the actual size of the berry, as they are not as big as it looks. They are actually quite small in person. I am familiar with crab apples, as there are many around my neighbourhood as well, so I know that it isn't a crab apple.

Unfortunately, the berries haven't grown out yet, but from what I remember, the inside is white-ish and kind of squishy. It's sweet and juicy, and kind of feels like a blueberry.
 
pollinator
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Amelanchier of some sort. Need to see the leaves. They are delicious!
 
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I would second Amelanchier. The consistency and level of tart and sweetness are somewhat similar to blueberry. The seeds are bigger, crunchy and taste like almond. The blossoms are beautifull white stars, like small quince blossoms. Most Amelanchier species have a really nice leaf colour in fall. Birds love the berries. The shape of the leaves varies between species, so I can not be shure from those pictures.
 
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"The consistency and level of tart and sweetness are somewhat similar to blueberry. The seeds are bigger, crunchy and taste like almond."

Judging by the description, I'd have to say that this is the type of berry I'll definitely dig into. Sounds delicious!
 
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I always suggest a berry identification book for proper identification (maybe from the library).  As far as I know and have read, any berry in North America that has a crown on the bottom (apple, blueberry, etc) is a "pome" and isn't toxic.

I was going to vote for serviceberry and then I looked up Amelanchier and that's what it is.  So I'll throw in a third vote for that
 
Tj Jefferson
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 I'd have to say that this is the type of berry I'll definitely dig into.



Gary, I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but the deep south is not very hospitable to this species. Most are marginal even in VA where I am. You have tons of options in Tampa. Grow some Avocado!
 
pollinator
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I’d guess those are juneberries like others have thought.
 
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