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Blemishes on young apples  RSS feed

 
Posts: 16
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How can i prevent bugs from chewing holes in my young apples? I have an all seasons oil spray but i don't know when to apply it.
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steward
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Location: Zones 2-4 Wyoming and 4-5 Colorado
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Howdy Zane, I have not tried it yet but I am currently reading a book wherein the author tells a story of his father wrapping each apple in plastic bags shortly after the bloom falls off. He says if the bugs get to the apples in a young state it is to late. As a fun side note he also says that his dad would write names of friends and family on the outside of the bags when the apples got a little bigger, with a magic marker, and this would block the sun from the peal causing the ripe apples to have the names "imprinted" on them!
 
Zane Baty
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Miles, I'll have to try that with the apples that don't have any marks on them. Thanks for the ideas.
 
Posts: 12
Location: Kansas Temperate Zone
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Zane, Hi from a Temperate climate in Kansas, I will share with you what I have found best video about compost tea. Here is the title of a cool video about it... Compost Tea for Growing BIG Vegetables

I use compost tea for all of my fruits and vegetables. Compost Tea. (No, you DO NOT DRINK COMPOST TEA!!!)
Every plant that I have introduced to compost tea has survived the Harsh 120F degree to -20 Fdegree Kansas weather. You do not have to have a compost pile to make compost tea, but if you happen to have a compost pile, it helps all the better. Compost tea can be very simple or more complex and interesting with a few additions. Here is the most basic 2 ingredient recipe...  TOOLS- a 5 gallon bucket, a spade shovel, Ingredients- 2 shovels-full or approximately 2 gallons of good quality compost, (if you don't have compost, may substitute with topsoil, dirt, or even old dried dead leaves, from a nearby source), 3 or 4 gallons of water.

Find a place outside that you can place the bucket so that it will get indirect sunlight. Place the dirt or compost into the bucket, filling the remainder of the bucket with water all but the top two inches or so. stir it with the shovel or a stick, and then walk away from it for a  a day to a couple of days, stirring it every day or every other day for a week or so. After about the 3rd or 4th day you may see a sheen or a slightly oily looking film start to appear on the surface of the water and it will start to smell a little mucky like swamp water, (this is normal as the bacteria in the soil are feeding on the nutrients in the soil and one another), Normal. At this point you will also see that the water should have changed from a clear clean looking water to more of a color of tea. DO NOT DRINK IT!!! It will have bacteria in it that the plants will drink and will use to grow, and to coat its leaves through transpiration. That bacteria will make it less tasty to bugs as it makes a breathable sort of protective waxy coating on the surface of the plant.
Let me know if you try it too and how it turns out for you. Note I use Molasses as an additive to feed the tea, and I think the guy in the video feeds the tea with it too in a powdered form, while he put air into it.
 
Larry Jackson
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Location: Kansas Temperate Zone
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Love the Hostas too  :)
 
gardener
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I have been putting the ziplocs on the apples for years.  Totally cool idea about the names Miles.  It is a lot of work, but you get organic apples very cheaply. 

I also use compost tea.  Great idea.
John S
PDX OR
 
garden master
Posts: 1987
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
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I'm definitely not sure but that could be from the apple maggot fly.  Be sure to google it to make sure.  I haven't tried this yet but other folks in my garden club do.  Take either a red supermarket junk apple or a plastic fake apple and hang it in the tree.  Cover it with tanglefoot (sticky stuff).  The fly aims to put its eggs into the ripest apple on the tree so they focus on that one and get stuck to it and die, leaving your other apples alone.
 
Zane Baty
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Thanks everyone for the responses. I'll see what i can do.
 
pollinator
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Location: Worcestershire, England
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Its a little hard to tell from the photo but I think that is apple scab which is fungal issue. The best solution for apple scab is to grow a resistant variety. You can spray but something you want to do early on in the season. Ensuring good airflow and sunlight via pruning is also useful in preventing it.
 
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Solar ovens, haybox cooker - What would you build to go with a rocket oven?
https://permies.com/t/89917/Solar-ovens-haybox-cooker-build
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