I just dropped the price of
the permaculture playing cards
for a wee bit.

 

 

uses include:
- infecting brains with permaculture
- convincing folks that you are not crazy
- gift giving obligations
- stocking stuffer
- gambling distraction
- an hour or two of reading
- find the needle
- find the 26 hidden names

clickity-click-click

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Fall and winter reading list thread  RSS feed

 
pollinator
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OK I don't read much in the summer but I read a lot when there is snow and cold so I would love to start a NEW Fall and winter reading list thread where people will post new books that they have read so that I know what to go borrow from the library.

I'm starting with the one I just saw mentioned in the omega thread..this is the first on my new library list of books to get:

The Resilient Gardener by Carol Deppe

If others will mention really good books I'll put them on the list IF I haven't read them to borrow when the weather turns nippy. I read tons of books last winter many of them either suggested by people on this forum or found in the back of a book on the to read list..

thanks.
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Gardening When it Counts by Steve Solomon.
 
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Eliot Coleman's 'The New Organic Grower'.

You've probably read it, but I'm mentioning it here anyway.
 
pollinator
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ill be reading "the book of nature" as sepp calls it all winter.
 
pollinator
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Down here I do most of my outdoor work in the Fall and Winter. 

Books I've enjoyed that are relevant to our discussions: 

"Becoming Native to This Place" by Wes Jackson

"The Unsettling of America" by Wendell Berry

"On Good Land" by Michael Ableman

"Beyond Civilization" by Daniel Quinn

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I just read On Guerrilla Gardening by Richard Reynolds. it takes awhile ( at least for me) to see his point but it was good.

my guide is self sufficiency for the 21st century. I love this book!!! it has a lot of good ideas and pictures.
 
gardener
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Tao Te Ching
 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
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Great start, I have these written down and will order them from the library as soon as the weather turns to reading weather, keep em coming and I haven't read a single one of them
 
steward
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Anything by Pat Colby, 'Natural Farming ' in particular. Her books emphasise keeping stock animals healthy, but the information is relevant to generally caring for the soil. She's Australian and they have unique mineral issues, so that needs to be kept in mind.
'Weeds and what they tell' by Ehrenfriend Pfeiffer, http://www.biodynamics.com/node/153 is a great insight into, well, weeds and what they tell. More of a stick it in your pocket as you wander round kind of thing, so it's not really winter reading. It's pretty old (1950's), so some of the language is quite hilarious and I imagine some info is dated, but there's lots of good stuff.
 
pollinator
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Roots Demystified by Robert Kourik. Actually, anything by this author is good reading, but this one is really fascinating.

And of course Teaming with Microbes, I forget the author's name.
 
gardener
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I'm enjoying 'Accidental Farmers' by Tim Young (recommended by sally fallon and Gene Logsdon, whose, btw, latest "Holy Shit" is also interesting).  He may be an even more-hardcore Salatin... ?
 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
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Nancy which one is the author of Holy Shit?
 
                                      
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I'm reading the real food revival and its an eye opening experience let me tell you. its a very confirming book for me that everything i'm doing and want to do in my life is on the right track. Permaculture.... sustainability.... simplify.... back to basics......local......
 
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Location: Wilmington, Delaware, Eastern Piedmont, USDA 7a
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Bioshelter Market Garden by Darrell Frey

Urban Homesteading by Rachel Kaplan with K. Ruby Blume

Growing Older by Joan Dye Gussow

There has been a lot of interesting books written less from a permaculture perspective and in more of a reporting on 'new agriculture' way as well "The Town That Food Saved," and books that touch on broader food security issues such as "The Last Fish Tale," not to mention some fun memoirs like "Farm City" and "Quarter-Acre farm."

I read Holy Shit: Managing Manure To Save Mankind by Gene Logsdon its an amazing book. The whole thing is just sort of amazing, I want to buy a copy just to leave on my coffee table, since really its a small and attractive volume. His other book Small Scale Grain Raising is also a really great read.
 
nancy sutton
gardener
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Sandor Katz:  The Revolution Will Not Be Microwaved (and his Fermentation book).  Holzer:  sepp holzer's Permaculture (his new how-to).
Lierre Keith:  The Vegetarian Myth (she's on a tear). 
Sally Fallon:  Nourishing Traditions (an old one).
I like the French perspective of  Preserving Food without Freezing or Canning, by Gardeners and Farmers of Centre Terre Vivante .
  All available from Amazon, et al.
 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
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thanks, some do not have authors, anyone know who the authors are of those above that do not include them, like
real food revival
farm city
1/4 acre farm
the town that food saved
 
nancy sutton
gardener
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Farm City - Novella Carpenter (loved her!!)
Mini Farming - Bret Markham
The Real Food Revival - Sherri Vinton
The Town that Saved Food - Ben Hewitt

And thanks for posting this query - lots for me to peruse, too
 
pollinator
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The Dirty Life by Kristin Kimball--she meets her farmer husband and they start a really awesome CSA based on people taking what they need
 
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Lateral Thinking, Edward de Bono
 
Michael Radelut
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'Gary Taubes: Why We Get Fat, And What To Do About It'

Not the nicest title, but essential nonetheless.
 
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Location: Chihuahua Desert
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1491 - to see what permaculture looked like on a mass scale...
 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
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I am bringing this LIST back to the top as there have been many people asking me about what to read as well. Also I have gathered some titles from other reading that I would like to find at the library as well..here are those:
The Weather Resilient Garden by Charles W G Smith
Hot Plants for cold Climaters
Palms Won't grow here and other Myths
Weeds or Wild Nature by David Holmgren
Forests in Permaculture by Bill Mollison
Amaranth to Zai Holes Laura S Meltzner
Complette Book of edible Landscaping by Rosalind Creasy
Designing and Maintaining your Edible Landscape Naturally by Robert Kourek
Oriental Vegetables by Jay Larkcom
Permaculture Principals and Pathways Beyond sustainability by David Holmgren
Foods not Lawns by H C Flores
The Permaculture book of Ferment and Human Nutrition by Bill Mollison
How to Make $100,000 from a 25 acre Farm by Dr Booker T Whatley (rodale)
biodynamic Farming Practice by Sattler
A Biodynamic Farm by Hugh Lovel
Biodybnamic farming vol 1 -3 by Ehrenfried Pfeiffer
Grasp the Nettle by Peter Proctor

hope to be able to get to reading some of these soon

also if you have any websites to list where there is free reading available..those would be great additions..I have gone to some but have found very little free reading actually available on them
 
pollinator
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"Well Preserved" By Eugenia Bone Mmmm... killer recipes.
 
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"Poop Culture- how America is shaped by it's grossest national product" by Dave Praeger. From the book description:

This book is not a history of poop, but a study of today. Its goal is to understand how poop affects us, how we view it, and why; to appreciate its impact from the moment it slides out of our anal sphincters to the moment it enters the sewage treatment plant; to explore how we’ve arrived at this strange discomfort and confusion about a natural product of our bodies; to see how this contradiction—the natural as unnatural—shapes our minds, relationships, environment, culture, economics, media, and art.

Paul Provenza, the director of The Aristocrats, says in his foreword: “It’s shocking to think that a book about poop can be considered an act of courage. But it is. Most of us have knee-jerk responses to the topic that we are not even aware of. Attitudes that, like the awful stench of poop itself, permeate all of society and culture. This book has some very profound and beautiful things to say. It takes a dirty, smelly, unpleasant subject like shit and brings forth ideas that are empowering, dignifying and life affirming.”

With the numerous discussions here on composting and bucket toilets, I haven't noticed any mention of this book. For those who are uneasy with dealing with this"matter", this book could help instill some respect rather than distain for our "waste".
 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
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have read about 8 or 10 books this month, and most of them were not worth mentioning on here..I did enjoy The resilient Garden by Carol Deppe..re read again Edible forest Gardens volume 1 and 2, and prefer volume 1 much over volume 2 which i was again falling asleep reading and ended up skipping over information not relative to my level of experience any longer..

Read Palms won't grow here ..didn't like it..re read a bunch of Bill Mollisons and Dave Holmgrens books and have 2 or 3 more on order at the library..love their books.

have several of the above books (in the list) on order from the library..hope to get them soon.

I hate to say it but a lot of the books on this list are available as free downloads if you google them with the letters pdf behind them..but I'm not sure what ones have been approved for pdf by their authors and publishers so I hate to encourage people to do something illegal or immoral..but I'll admit I have read about a dozen or so books this last month free online..myself..but use your library otherwise.

there are also a lot of really good reading pamphlets you can download on pdf..that are legit todownload..some of my google searches were edible garden pdf, forest garden pdf..etc...comes up with a lot of good reading materials
 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
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This weekend I read Food not Lawns...it had some good information in it but it was geared more toward "groups" and "politics" but I did get some good info out of it.

This week I read The once and future forest...this was a very informative book but was geared a bit more toward larger forest reforestataion that I'm dealing with and a lot more toward the native/non native/ discussion which I didn't learn much from. There was some good information though that I found helpful, and will use this spring. There were some really good chapters and gave me a little information that will be helpful with my property and my food forests..but it didn't really mention hardly any food plants ..other than nuts and a few things..so it wasn't geared toward a food forest at all.

But that said, there is a lot of great information in it..a lot of which I have already learned from other books but bears repeating.

recommend both from a libraray but wouldn't put $ into them
 
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Brenda Groth wrote:have read about 8 or 10 books this month, and most of them were not worth mentioning on here..I did enjoy The resilient Garden by Carol Deppe..re read again Edible forest Gardens volume 1 and 2, and prefer volume 1 much over volume 2 which i was again falling asleep reading and ended up skipping over information not relative to my level of experience any longer..

Read Palms won't grow here ..didn't like it..re read a bunch of Bill Mollisons and Dave Holmgrens books and have 2 or 3 more on order at the library..love their books.

have several of the above books (in the list) on order from the library..hope to get them soon.

I hate to say it but a lot of the books on this list are available as free downloads if you google them with the letters pdf behind them..but I'm not sure what ones have been approved for pdf by their authors and publishers so I hate to encourage people to do something illegal or immoral..but I'll admit I have read about a dozen or so books this last month free online..myself..but use your library otherwise.

there are also a lot of really good reading pamphlets you can download on pdf..that are legit todownload..some of my google searches were edible garden pdf, forest garden pdf..etc...comes up with a lot of good reading materials




archive.org is a good online library for public domain media. It breaks everything up into live music/books/magazines/etc.. but if you take the time to sift through all they have, there is bound to be something on the topic you want.
 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
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thanks for the tip.

I just finished reading Designing and maintaining your edible landscape naturally..by Rober Kourk...would recommend borrowing it from a library. Had pneumonia while I was reading it so my copy will be germy..take precautions..tee hee.

I am just about to begin another David Holmgrem Permie book..Permaculture : Principles and Pathways beyond sustainability next..Hope it isn't just a repeat of all the other permie books..looking for some new info here.

still have about 100 books on my winter reading list..and winter is holding out for me here..snow the last few days..rain the next few and then more snow..so I guess I'll get a few more books read before winter ends..not bad with my late start..but have a list ready for next year.
 
Brian Jeffrey
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^^^ That's funny you mention that first Kourk book. I'm waiting for it to be returned to the library so I can grab it. I've heard a lot of good things about it on this site.
 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
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Permaculture: Principles and Pathways Beyond Sustainability by David Holmgren

I would say, read the earlier permaculture books. This was OK..but it was extremely political and outspoken against certain politics and religions..which I found quite off putting especially when it talks "Integrate rather than Segregate" but speaks in bigoted terms throughout the book.

Read it if you like ..some good information..but be forwarned. Most books I'll still recommend even when they have some outspoken political or religious beliefs..I'm going to bypass recommending this one and suggest you read some of Bill Mollison's permaculture works instead.
 
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