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Where oh where can I buy farmland for under $50,000?  RSS feed

 
Posts: 112
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I know Spanish, so Central or South America would be good. I would like to buy land that is AT LEAST 2 acres and also preferably not in the US because I don't want to have to pay for health insurance 
 
Posts: 113
Location: Hatfield, PA
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My opinion is: I would rather stay in a relatively stable country that supports individual ownership of property. If you'd like to know more about US land, here are two links I would suggest.

A very good article on how to buy land cheaply:
http://www.homestead.org/NeilShelton/HowtoBuyLand/VeryCheaply.htm

Property search, based on your criteria.
http://www.unitedcountry.com/

Not sure if this link will work for you, but I searched for farms of at least 20 acres for less than $50k nationwide.
http://www.unitedcountry.com/search06/SearchResults.Asp?SID=96588285&Lcnt=&AU=N&RF=N
 
Annah Rachel
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Wow, those are some good links! Thanks! I would like to stay in the US, but I really don't know what I would do about healthcare....
 
pollinator
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Location: North Central Michigan
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Michigan USA check Northern Michigan Craigslist at craigslist.com
 
Mother Tree
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Portugal's nice, and Portuguese isn't so very different to Spanish. 

The prices are all over the place here, but a couple of years ago we bought ten acres of land for 6000 euros, and our last wwoofer bought himself a two acre farm with loads of buildings and a house in need of renovation for around 26 000 euros.
 
Posts: 1095
Location: Mountains of Vermont, USDA Zone 3
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gossamermoonspider wrote:I know Spanish, so Central or South America would be good. I would like to buy land that is AT LEAST 2 acres and also preferably not in the US because I don't want to have to pay for health insurance 


$50,000 will buy you a lot of acreage up in the North East Kingdom of Vermont. As usual, even more will buy you a lot more as the price goes down in volume. To give you an example, we are near Montpelier, the capital, and the first two acres of land is valued at about $9,000 each. There's your two acres for less than $50K. We're up in the mountains which helps. North East Kingdom is even cheaper.

Cheers

-Walter
Sugar Mountain Farm
Pastured Pigs, Sheep & Kids
in the mountains of Vermont
Read about our on-farm butcher shop project:
http://SugarMtnFarm.com/butchershop
http://SugarMtnFarm.com/csa
 
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Arkansas up in the Ozarks has some good land prices on undeveloped land, nothing with a house or anything like that though usually
http://www.ar-realestate.net/listings.htm

Seen 1 listing foe 40 acres ans another for 29 for under 50,000...maybe to your intrest...

 
Posts: 211
Location: Pennsylvania
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We bought out place earlier this year for a bit more than what you want to spend. We have a 3 bedroom house on 20 acres. It need some work in that it was not farmed for a several decades and a bit over grown. However, we have the house, garage and shop, about 5 acres of decent pasture, a small orchard and a large garden. We paid $87,ooo. There is a creek on the property and almost half of the land is wooded. We are in western PA, but I see a lot of place like this  and smaller here and across the border in Ohio. Whats  the deal with health insurance, Obamacare is never going to be enforceable and will get shot down after the next elections. Besides it is grossly illegal. I really doubt that my Amish neighbor would have to pay some sort of mandatory insurance. And if you need health care you need to pay for it.
 
gardener
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Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
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There's an old saying,  "the poor always pay twice".  Generally those who can't afford to pay for things upfront will pay more and will also rack up interest charges, late fees etc.

   With property there is another force at work. I call it the mad scramble for the bottom. There are always going to be thousands of people who can barely afford to get into the real estate market and with all of them competing for the same bottom of the barrel properties the pricees at this end of the market are inflated.

    In every city and rural area where I have searched for property I have found that the cheaper by the dozen rule applies. That is if a given quantity of land is available at a certain price, you can buy 10 times that much land for much less than 10 times the price. So the person who can only afford the small parcel ends up paying much more per acre. Even in searching out international listings I have found this to be so.

    I sold real estate in my younger years and was always amazed at the price of the worst properties on the market. In a city where your average house goes for $200,000 there are always absolutely rundown rat nest, crackhead houses which should be demolished. These houses go for 100,000.   Even though you get far less than half the value there is still a minimum value that is assigned to any "livable"property. The numbers vary vastly depending on location but the idea of getting far less for your money at the bottom of the market still holds true. In Nanaimo British Columbia $100,000 buys you a rundown hovel on a postage stamp lot surrounded by hookers and crackheads. $300,000 buys a nice three bedroom home and half an acre with gardens, a greenhouse and agreeable neighbors.

      When doing a comparative analysis looking at what it would cost to replace structures on properties like our examples the more expensive property generally wins. When you consider the cost of a raw lot in the better area and then add up what it would cost to build the nice house, put in the driveway, well and other services, construct the greenhouse, barn and workshop the cost of all these things is usually quite a bit higher than the asking price. So the property is a good deal. Now if you look at the postage stamp lot and assign it a value based on land cost for the larger parcel you see that it is grossly inflated. Then consider how much it would cost to tear down the wreck of a house and construct something decent and the cost will be far in excess of the going rate in the cheaper area so this would not be advisable route to take.

   
     Bottom of the market rural properties in my area often bring higher price if they contain a rundown 1970s mobile home. Old trailers like this are available for $1000 or less yet people will pay $30,000 more for a piece of land which contains this liability.

    So no matter where you go make sure that you don't go to an area which is so expensive that you are part of that horde of suckers clambering for the bottom of the barrel properties. These places are a suckers deal no matter how you slice it. You'd be further ahead to go to the middle of nowhere where there are plenty of $10,000 parcels. Fools in that area will all be competing for those places and with $50,000 to spend you will have entered the middle class
 
Posts: 700
Location: rainier OR
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I happen to think I made a good deal with my bottom of the market property, there are a lot of parcels ten times the size of mine in this neck of the woods with less productivity than my 2 acres due to steep slopes and watershed use restrictions, and my hose payment is less than renting three bedrooms and a yard would cost. yes the house has some issues but its bones are good.

I did a lot of searching in a buyers market though and bought the place with an fha rehab loan to fix the foundation. 50% more money would have doubled the size of the primary dwelling, and the costs of upkeep, not to mention likely put me in a neighborhood where someone would object to the backyard projects.
 
Posts: 182
Location: Long Beach, CA
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If you're in the US, Georgia is a good candidate. Look around the Atlanta area. There are lots of opportunities for rock bottom prices.
 
steward
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Location: FL
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The real estate bubble, credit collapse, and 'economic downturn'  has left a great many properties in arrears.  Foreclosures and short sales are out there in abundance.  Land and homes can be had for a fraction of their previous highs.

My house in town was a foreclosure sale.  I purchased it for about 60% of the price the previous owner paid, and did it before the housing bubble started to swell.  My place outside of town has 3.7 acres, purchased after the bubble from a desperate seller for $45k.  Its big enough for my needs.  I'm looking real hard at another place nearby with 5 acres, 2 homes in great shape, with a big garage and 5 acres.  Its a short sale, meaning it is in the foreclosure process but not yet foreclosed upon.  Asking price is $169k.  If I make an offer, it will be about $75k.

Talk to a real estate agent, ask about short sale properties and foreclosures.

I've seen land in Saskatchewan-160 acres for $30000, previously planted with grains.
I've seen land in Maine going for $250/acre but its way out in the woods.

 
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I'm looking for land in Saint Lucia, and for 50k you can probably get 2-3 acres in the bush, ie no utilities, gravel road, and generally overgrown area. Which is pretty much perfect for homesteaders. Solar panels and diesel generators are common in these areas for electricity, and enough rainfall to catch more than enough water. After doing all my research, this seems to be one of the better Carribean Islands to do the kind of homesteading permies think about.
 
Annah Rachel
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VovaWasabi wrote:
I'm looking for land in Saint Lucia, and for 50k you can probably get 2-3 acres in the bush, ie no utilities, gravel road, and generally overgrown area. Which is pretty much perfect for homesteaders. Solar panels and diesel generators are common in these areas for electricity, and enough rainfall to catch more than enough water. After doing all my research, this seems to be one of the better Carribean Islands to do the kind of homesteading permies think about.


Wow, Saint Lucia looks beautiful! What language do they speak there? French?
 
Vova Wasabi
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they are trilingual! It's part of british commonwealth, so official language is english, and everyone speaks it, official business language. The locals speak a french patois, and it's similar enough to regular french that most can speak it too. I found it to be perfect in that regard, as you can start learning french there, and that will open up all the french speaking carribean islands.

After buying land you get resident status, and can apply for citizenship 8 years after, or earlier if you do something outstanding.
 
Annah Rachel
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VovaWasabi wrote:
they are trilingual! It's part of british commonwealth, so official language is english, and everyone speaks it, official business language. The locals speak a french patois, and it's similar enough to regular french that most can speak it too. I found it to be perfect in that regard, as you can start learning french there, and that will open up all the french speaking carribean islands.

After buying land you get resident status, and can apply for citizenship 8 years after, or earlier if you do something outstanding.


Awesome! Is there a website you know of that lists properties there?
 
Vova Wasabi
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sadly, no. Everything I found on the internet was too expensive, beachfront or properties with good view to be developed. I'm there now, and even realtors dont understand what we want to do, and why we might want to get something off the grid, even if its cheaper. I drove around the island, there were some "land for sale" signs, first one was selling 22 acres in 1 acre lots for 22.5k an acre. But it's looking like if you want to have a selection in front of you and being able to pick form a lot of choices, one has to go down here and search. I have yet to check the newspaper, but I'm leaving tomorrow, hopefully to get some leads from the contacts I made to look at a bunch of land. it's definitely there.
 
Posts: 69
Location: Ossineke, MI
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I second Northern Michigan. I love my land in North East Lower Michigan, but if you are looking to make some money farming organically North West Lower Michigan is the way to go. There is a rapidly developing market for local, organic food and you can still get in on the ground floor.

Land in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan can be bought VERY cheaply, but the growing season is several weeks shorter than lower Michigan and there isn't too much in the way of a market for organic food.
 
Posts: 51
Location: Bulgaria, Zone 7/8
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I live in Bulgaria.  Land is fairly cheap here.  Farmland is from $820 to $1600 per acre.  Land quality is very good, climate is very good (zone 7/ Nice warm to hot summer (mid July to Mid August quite hot) and just about now the nights are chilly but during the day in the mid to high 20 degrees C.  Good rainfall through to end of June, July and August quite dry normally.  Property tax very low, like annually on one acre you would pay less than $50.  Figs, Sunflowers, Persimons, Grapes, Peaches, Apples, Pomegranites, Wheat, soft fruits, corn, tomatoes, peppers, everything grows well here.

There's actually some variance in the climate depending on where you live.  I live in the plains, in the valley of the peaches (Sliven area).  The mountains are cooler, slightly longer winter, snow, and a few degrees cooler in the winter.  Coast is not far for fish. 

Normally if you would want to farm, people have their home in the village with about 1/4 acre to 1/2 acre, and then their farmland at the edge or around the village.  There's not really any point to having grazing land, because the shepherd comes everyday to collect your goats and sheep in the morning, and bring them back at night, about $2.00/month per animal.  The shepherd takes them in surrounding fields.

I like it here.

 
Posts: 1034
Location: Near Klamath Falls, Oregon
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How would it be, though, for someone moving there from another country?

Kathleen
 
Margie Nieuwkerk
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Location: Bulgaria, Zone 7/8
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Depends on the person and their situation. 

Language is not easy, but English is now taught in schools.  I get by with broken bulgarian and I'm old and it's hard to teach an old dog new tricks.  People are friendly.

With regard to visa, that too depends on your circumstances, but there are numerous options.  For europeans it's even easier.

There are some rules for foreigners buying land, but these are easy to abide by.  It is no problem to own land.

I would say, if you are a family person, and all your family stays at home, you will be lonely.

If you are retired, it is a really good place to retire because everything is so cheap. 

My sister came over from the states this summer.  I was a bit worried about what she would think, because although it is very beautiful here (the nature), it is also very backwards.  Like horse carts, geese in the road, donkey's braying in the distance, etc.

She LOVED it.  One of her sons didn't like it, he likes luxury living, and I think her husband prefers more luxury hotels and such.

My sister was ready to buy a place out here (there was a little property, very small little house at the end of the village, 1/2 acre land, for about $3,600.  The properties here need work tho.  It's not like in the states.  It was very tempting for her, but didn't quite make sense because of her situation with the kids.  She was sorely tempted tho.

We bought a village house here about 5 years ago, cost about $6,000 and then total renovation (new roof, plumbing, gutted with walls broken out, new bathroom, new kitchen, flooring (laminate and tiles), cost approx $20,000.  Prices went up for a while but have come down again.

There's a dairy in the village so I get fresh very creamy yoghurt every day, and my across the street neighbour gives/and sometimes sells me her fresh goat milk,  people eat what's in season here and the quality of the produce is fantastic.

I think you could say it is very biodiverse here.  That's one of the things that my sister and the boys noticed.  The fields had many varied crops, not miles of one kind of crop.  And peoples house gardens have a huge array of stuff and they look really nice (unlike mine  )

Everybody cans, preserves, etc.

Next week the lorry will come to bring me my wood for the winter.  8 cu meter is more than enough for my stove and costs approx $315.00  That will see me through from November to some of the chilly nights in April.

I am getting the supplies to make a rocket mass heater, and hopefully that will be done in a few weeks, so I will only need about  2 or 3 cu meter a year, and much of that can be from the fruit trees in the back field.

Don't know if that answers your question, but there you have it. 




 
Kathleen Sanderson
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Location: Near Klamath Falls, Oregon
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Actually, it sounds really nice!  What would an immigrant do for income in your village?  (If they didn't have income that would follow them, like a pension -- my DD gets SSI, but if we moved out of the United States, it wouldn't follow us.)

Kathleen
 
Margie Nieuwkerk
Posts: 51
Location: Bulgaria, Zone 7/8
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Gosh, that's a tough one.  Unemployment is skyrocketing here at the moment.  And starting a business here under current climate would be a challenge.  Best bet would be something internet related.

I am currently doing admin for my sister in the USA, for as long as this will last - given the economy.  Her business is still doing good so I'm hoping to hang in for a while, but am in the process of setting up that no matter what happens, even if no income, no pension, I can still survive. 

I'm collecting barter items and learning some things that would be useful that they don't have here, that I could exchange.

Health insurance is about $12/month and like I said, annual property tax is really low, mine is about $25 per year, and I have a very cute little house on about 1/2 acre, which is a big chunk for me, I couldn't handle anything bigger. 

I've been kind of "preparing" and storing things that might be hard to come by if things go really skewed, and other than that I live simply but feel like I'm living richly.  If my electricity goes, I actually don't mind, I have come up with many many many alternatives, so it's ok.  All I feel I need is my insurance, and the ability to pay for my pets care, which is actually also very much cheaper here.

 
Kathleen Sanderson
Posts: 1034
Location: Near Klamath Falls, Oregon
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I wonder how immigrants will be treated by the local people when things get tough? 

Moving over there isn't really something I could consider, but it does sound nice!

Kathleen
 
Posts: 21
Location: Citra Florida
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If you can stand the heat, and survive without a normal job then north central Florida lake city/ suwannee county area. Its not too far out from civilization and has alot of small horse farms.
http://www.landwatch.com is one of my favorite search tools.
 
Ken Peavey
steward
Posts: 2524
Location: FL
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I'm 15 miles north of Lake City, about 5 miles from the Suwannee County line.  My brothers wife is a real estate agent, comes in handy, message me for contact information.

The climate allows year round growing.  The soil is sand, from top to bottom, but there are ways to develop the soil to account for its nutrient deficiency.  Common crops for this area are pine trees and pasture, which is why the horse farms are so popular.  There is some growing of food, watermelon, blueberries, strawberries, and cabbage-these will hold up to the acid soil.  There are farmers markets in most towns, you could fill a schedule every week for most of the year.

Lake City has a population of around 15k people.  It has all the amenities of a regular town.  The county is around 60k people, mostly rural.  Suwannee County has a lower population, with the main town of Live Oak being comparable to Lake City in offering shopping and commercial venues. 

Large cities in the region include Gainesville (UF football), Jacksonville, and Valdosta GA.  These cities have everything under the sun in terms of commerce, recreation, health care, airports, and offer a substantial market.  Figure an hour drive from Lake City to a metropolitan area.

Land prices are not out of the world, $5k/acre for 5 or so acres.  $50k would pick up a few acres of land with a habitable home, well, septic and pole.  Property taxes are not extreme, with a homeowners exemption of 25k if you live on the property.  My taxes are about 400/year.  Bear in mind, Florida has no income tax, thats a big draw for lots of folks.  Sales tax is 7%.  The cost of living is not extreme, a grand a month pays all my bills, including the mortgage

This area is far enough inland that hurricanes are usually blown down to big thunderstorms by the time they reach here.  Normal rain is around 54" per year, dry in the winter.  We have been in a drought for the past year, but the rains have picked up some.  Raining right now as a matter of fact.  There is little wind, dont even bother with the notion of a windmill.  Sun is plentiful, with 10-14 hour days throughout the year.  At 30 degree North, the sun will be directly overhead in the summer, offering an abundance of energy.  Winter will see an occasional frost in December through February.  Summer is 73 at night, 93 in the day.  Winter is 45 night, 80 in the day.  Summer can be considerably humid, winter is bliss.


 
Posts: 6
Location: Central Texas, zone 8
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There's a lot of cheap land in my state of Texas right now. My husband and I are currently looking for some property and it's definitely a buyer's market, I constantly get notices of properties I'm watching dropping in price. Of course, Texas is in a horrible drought right now, making homesteading more complicated. I'm hoping that with careful permaculture water harvesting and storage practices that we'll be able to overcome that problem, but we're also looking for something on or near a lake, just to be sure we have access to water. As you can imagine, those kinds of properties are more expensive.

For the absolute cheapest, you can look in the beautiful mountainous area near big bend. I've seen 10 acre properties for 3k. Of course, that is in an area where you are in the middle of nowhere (nearest town an hour's drive), don't have access to electricity and have to dig a (deep) well for water. I'm considering buying one of those properties just for shits and giggles. It is a really beautiful area. A good place to start is:
http://www.landsoftexas.com/texas/

But as others have said, you get the best leads just driving around and looking at for sale sites and then going to the websites of those small local realtors.
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Tennessee has a lot going on permaculture wise.

This is an amazing place for plants to be.
Great soil, lots of rain and lots of sun.
Seems when it rains it comes down quick and then the sun pops out.

http://www.realtracs.com/PropertySearchMap.aspx
 
Posts: 37
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I agree with Daisy - come to Bulgaria - its a brilliant place to live. property and land for around $7,000 - you could live on the rest of your money or set up a business. - the cost of living is also very cheap.  I've been here 5 years and i love it.
 
steward
Posts: 979
Location: Northern Zone, Costa Rica - 200 to 300 meters Tropical Humid Rainforest
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We live in Costa Rica, where, if you know how, you can buy farm land for about 2,000 per acre, that is volcanic soil. We have about 900 acres (okay, I know I lost control) which is plantations / reforestation, etc.

Health care insurance is 900 dollars a year. We don't have any. We just save our money and pay as we go. My wife just had to have surgery for a kidney stone, it was, complete, 9000 dollars from the best in the country, he did an excellent job.

Since, aside from six stitches for 40 dollars, it was the only health care expense we have had for 7+ years here, I figure we are just about even, and of course, when you pay cash, you make the decisions.

Only until recently (like the last 100 years or so) have people depended on health insurance. The reason most people live longer is good food, good air, good water and less stress. Health care is like having a good mechanic, it is better if you change your oil, if you catch my drift.

For me, I wouldn't live somewhere unhealthy, working in an unhealthy manner, living I life I didn't like, for health insurance. Seems a bit backward to me.

 
Annah Rachel
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Fred Morgan wrote:
We live in Costa Rica, where, if you know how, you can buy farm land for about 2,000 per acre, that is volcanic soil. We have about 900 acres (okay, I know I lost control) which is plantations / reforestation, etc.

Health care insurance is 900 dollars a year. We don't have any. We just save our money and pay as we go. My wife just had to have surgery for a kidney stone, it was, complete, 9000 dollars from the best in the country, he did an excellent job.

Since, aside from six stitches for 40 dollars, it was the only health care expense we have had for 7+ years here, I figure we are just about even, and of course, when you pay cash, you make the decisions.

Only until recently (like the last 100 years or so) have people depended on health insurance. The reason most people live longer is good food, good air, good water and less stress. Health care is like having a good mechanic, it is better if you change your oil, if you catch my drift.

For me, I wouldn't live somewhere unhealthy, working in an unhealthy manner, living I life I didn't like, for health insurance. Seems a bit backward to me.




Wow, that is so awesome. Where in Costa Rica would be a good place to live? I was just there this summer. A lot of places were kind of expensive. I was on the Osa Peninsula though, and there were some places that were selling from 15,000. Less than an acre, but it had a nice looking house on it. So where is a good place to look? Thanks!
 
Posts: 35
Location: eastern part of West Tennessee
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Here are a few more sites to check:

http://www.landandfarm.com/

http://www.landsofamerica.com/america/

http://www.realtor.com/

And for some places around here in your price range:

http://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1125-Feather-Ridge-Rd_Lexington_TN_38351_M85344-05928

http://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/230-Lohrig-Rd_Jackson_TN_38301_M81735-58065

http://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/Lake-Ave_Jackson_TN_38301_M75644-78302

Some things to remember when looking at property is to make sure you will have the timber rights and mineral rights to that property.  If someone else has the timber rights to your land, they can come in at any time and remove any or all trees on your land, includeing any fruit trees you plant.    Also in some places you will need to secure the water rights, there have been cases of people being forced to remove their rain barrels or cisterns by the water rights holders.
 
Fred Morgan
steward
Posts: 979
Location: Northern Zone, Costa Rica - 200 to 300 meters Tropical Humid Rainforest
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gossamermoonspider wrote:
Wow, that is so awesome. Where in Costa Rica would be a good place to live? I was just there this summer. A lot of places were kind of expensive. I was on the Osa Peninsula though, and there were some places that were selling from 15,000. Less than an acre, but it had a nice looking house on it. So where is a good place to look? Thanks!


To buy land here, you need to be here, and take your time. I am talking six months to a year. Living in a foreign country isn't for everyone. It isn't just about language, it is about ability to adjust too. It takes about two years to get over culture shock. If you think there is the "right" way to do things, you will probably go back home. You have to be flexible, you can't change a country.

You have to get away from the tourist areas, into the campo. The tourist areas are very expensive, We live within 30 minutes of Lake Arenal. If you want a view of the lake, you pay 10 x more. We have a great view all the way to Nicaragua.

Life moves slower here, so does purchasing real estate. And the prices you find in the Internet are way inflated.
 
Margie Nieuwkerk
Posts: 51
Location: Bulgaria, Zone 7/8
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Fred, you speak such truth!  It is the same here in Bulgaria.  I love it here, and I encourage others to come, but it's really for those who are willing to adapt to a different pace of life and are willing to have it be "not like at home".  And trying to go around "changing" or "improving" things only brings stress on yourself and makes the locals feel like you are patronizing them and makes them dislike being with you.

The two year adjustment sounds about right too.  I've lived in several different countries, and even though they were "western"  I still had to adapt to the culture.  There's periods when you do nothing but be critical of the new place    and then that eventually fades to the point of that you actually don't want to go back anymore.
 
Fred Morgan
steward
Posts: 979
Location: Northern Zone, Costa Rica - 200 to 300 meters Tropical Humid Rainforest
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Thanks Daisy, Bulgaria sounds like a place I might enjoy as well. My wife and I are planning a bit more travel so perhaps we will take a trip that way.

Regarding the adjustment period, for those who don't know, it is called culture shock, and as Daisy says, you will experience it (very few people don't) EACH TIME you change your location.

And if and when you go back home, you will experience reverse culture shock. 

When you first arrive in a culture, all is new and cool, and then you try to get something done, not knowing the rules, or you are taken advantage of by someone, or you made a mistake and have to deal with the government, or .... Oh, it can be exciting. 

But you have to keep reminding yourself "it works for them, I just have to figure out why" and you get through it, and learn a whole new way of thinking - which is worth all the pain.

From what I have seen, those who come to a foreign land like Costa Rica because they WANT to live in a developing country, and they like the people, do well. Those who go to a foreign land because it is cheaper, are exploiters, and honestly, the locals do an excellent job exploiting them. After all, they have home field advantage.

 
Posts: 95
Location: Central Texas, it is dry here.
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No matter how you find your cheap land...make sure you do as much research as possible.  My hubby found this ad for cheap land:

http://www.sunsetranches.net/index.html

Then he found these comments that were not too favorable:

http://www.complaintsboard.com/complaints/sunset-ranches-llc-van-horn-texas-texas-c91747.html

And within those comments was a link to prove the horrible truth...the land close by is a national toxic waste dump (can we say polluted ground water?):

http://www.txpeer.org/toxictour/merco.html

So, however you go about it, just be careful, ask lots of questions, do your research and don't buy until you are sure it is ok.
 
steward
Posts: 8019
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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I'll add a caveat:  Do not buy land in Amish country.  If the land was worth the asking price, the Amish would have already bought it!
 
Dale Hodgins
gardener
Posts: 6903
Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
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    I like to look for land that was part of some failed venture. Around here that usually means some sort of resource extraction. Quite often there are buildings and other structures associated with the former plan for the property. These can be converted to other uses.

     In traveling Canada's North I've discovered many properties which have been explored for gold or silver extraction and they never found enough resource to warrant a mining operation. But quite often a decent road has been established and buildings have been erected. The value of these parcels is not driven up by gold fever but rather they are passed over by anyone on a get rich quick spending spree.

   Chicken and pork operations which have failed due to obsolescence or for other reasons can provide a good land base with the attraction of buildings which go for pennies on the dollar. Building projects which ended in divorce or dissolution of other partnerships can be a good deal. Sometimes real estate assets are sold because some other aspect of the business has failed. With conventional agriculture that can mean that a supplier no longer gives credit or that the buyer no longer desires whatever product was being produced. Banks own many such distressed properties and they don't want them.

    As with any land which has had commercial activity in the past you want to make sure that the soil hasn't been polluted with anything and check for any other liabilities relating to anything that may have been done to the land, water and neighboring properties.
 
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smile4uinc.com


This is a very great site where you can buy undeveloped land at a very great price. They have a great reputation, and everything from investment land to farmland, to large acreage pieces at very reasonable prices.
 
Posts: 158
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i spent a couple of years looking for the same thing. Found several areas that were cheap. Florida ( big forclosure state,) New Mexico ( WESt side where there are some trees) lots of places in the south that are cheap. You can also get high desert land in New Mexico for about $1,000 an acre
I ended up getting a 2 acre place with an older mobile with septic and well in CAlifornia for $30, 000. Yes the mobile needed work and the land not all usable but this section has got lots of broken dwn and older mobiles pretty cheap. Yes, middle of nowhere though.Good hour to Red Bluff, CA Lots of orchards in the area for fruit trees.
 
Cob is sand, clay and sometimes straw. This tiny ad is made of cob:
Jacqueline Freeman - Honeybee Techniques - streaming video
https://permies.com/wiki/65175/videos/digital-market/Jacqueline-Freeman-Honeybee-Techniques-streaming
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