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Sales are closed until December 2024.

Description
We sell "rhizome sets" of Arundinaria gigantea, North America's largest native bamboo which are wild cultivated in Eastern Kentucky. Each rhizome set is enough to establish a single planting of giant river cane and orders typically include two or more rhizome sections. Orders will completely fill a USPS "side loading" medium priority mail box sized approximately 14 x 12 x 3.5 inches. Usually this equates to several sections of rhizome that are 12-24 inches long each. The bamboo "culms" are trimmed a few inches above the rhizome.




Price and shipping
The photo at left portrays a typical order of one rhizome set after the culms have been trimmed to prepare for shipping.
Each rhizome set order costs a flat rate of $59 per rhizome set, which includes $19 for USPS priority mail packing and shipping. If you order multiple rhizome sets, each set will be shipped in it's own box with its own tracking number.

We only accept orders that will be shipped to the continental United States.

Affiliate commission rate
You receive 9%, or in other words, $5.31 per order
If you think you know other folks who might want to place an order, you can create a permies affiliate link to this thread using your permies affiliate code. If anyone clicks on that affiliate link and then purchases rhizomes from us here, you will receive your percentage of the sale. There is more information at this link: https://permies.com/wiki/affiliate

About giant river cane
Arundinaria gigantea, giant river cane, is the largest of the three native North American bamboo species. Its native range includes the southeastern United States, west to Missouri, up the Mississippi Valley to southern Illinois and up the Ohio River to southern Ohio and Maryland. Vast canebrake ecosystems once filled river valleys here in the Central Appalachian mountains as recently as two hundred years ago composed of thousands of acres of giant river cane in low woods, areas with moist ground, and along riverbanks. Today, most of those canebrakes are gone, but river cane still grows in wild places that are hard for humans or grazing animals to reach.

The cane from Arundinaria gigantea has traditionally been used for craft and agricultural purposes. The variety of uses for river cane exceed the space available to list, but the Wikipedia articles for Arundinaria and Arundinaria gigantea are one starting point.

How big does it grow? How fast does it grow?

In our experience, this species tops out at about 20 feet. In diameter, the thicker culms are up to about three quarters of an inch; stout enough individually to serve as a fishing pole or a beanpole, but not strong enough to serve structural purposes.

Arundinaria bamboos primarily reproduce vegetatively through leptomorphic (running) rhizome growth. Arundinaria expand slowly compared to the most famously invasive running bamboo, but under good circumstances, this cane could become invasive as well, so select your site thoughtfully.

Order fulfillment
We dig and ship about once per week from the beginning of sales until the last frost in our area, usually around May 1. The rhizomes will be shipped within 24 hours of being dug to ensure their viability. You will receive an email the day your rhizomes are shipped so that you can prepare to receive your order.

$9,999.00

[December-April] Native North American bamboo rhizome sale - Giant River Cane - Arundinaria Gigantea - US shipping
  • Free USPS priority mail shipping anywhere in the continental US
Seller Mark William

Planting the rhizome set
Please plant your rhizome set as soon as possible, and until then, keep the rhizomes from drying out completely. If you need to wait more than a day or two to plant the rhizomes, "heel them in" to a temporary site outdoors, or in a cool indoor location like a garage, as you might a bare root tree.

Arundinaria gigantea is part of the grass family, and it may help to think of site selection and care in that way as a starting point. It can tolerate some shade, but does need a regular supply of sun and moisture. Don't plant your cane directly in a wetland, but find a site that is regularly moist without being saturated by water.

To plant your rhizome set:
  • Remove an area of soil approximately the same size as the package, then loosen the soil in the bottom of the planting area.
  • Place the rhizomes in this area, orienting the culms upward.
  • Cover the rhizomes with soil. Ensure at least an inch of packed soil above all sections of the rhizome. You may need to mound soil over the site to cover all sections.
  • You may find it convenient to place small stones along the rhizomes to help them conform to the new site if you find them bending upward and out of the soil. We suggest limiting the weight of each stone to a pound or two.

  • About wild cultivation
    Please be aware that these rhizomes are intentionally not grown in sterile conditions or soil. They are grown outdoors in USDA climate zone 6b in their natural habitat. During packaging, we remove loose soil along with any other visible plants that were growing along the rhizomes.

    How fast will they grow?
    For at least a year, your bamboo planting will be mostly underground and we suggest using flags or another marker to ensure the small cane culms aren't lost or accidentally mowed down. In their native environment, transplanted rhizomes will grow new culms that are approximately six to eight inches tall by the end of their first year, so choose a marker that will last until at least the second year when you can expect them to reach two or three feet in height. While the rhizomes are becoming established, you should plan to weed around the site periodically to ensure it isn't overrun by established or more invasive species.

    Return Policy
    We will not accept returns nor offer refunds. However if your river cane arrives safely from USPS but is not viable, we will ship one replacement rhizome package for the cost of shipping rounded up to the nearest whole dollar amount. We will only ship one replacement per customer or order.

    About Us
    Your purchase supports a homestead farm and family cemetery in Appalachia. Mark is a theater artist and nonprofit administrator from the Eastern Kentucky. Much of his professional work involves community-led food and agriculture programs. The farm has a focus on supporting citizen-led ecology, sustainability, and responsible wild harvesting practices.
    COMMENTS:
     
    steward
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    Hi Mark,

    Your "international shipping" button shows $9,999 as the price. Is that corect or a typo?



     
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    Liv Smith wrote:
    Your "international shipping" button shows $9,999 as the price. Is that corect or a typo?



    Hi Liv, thank you for the question! I would not like to offer international shipping, but I could not come up with a value for that price which would disable it (I tried things like putting in 0 or -1).

    Is there a more tidy way for me to disallow non-US sales?
     
    Mark William
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    Hi everyone! All orders received before Thursday have been sent out.

    We had another hard frost here, which is good for keeping the rhizomes dormant but makes digging even more of a challenge! We can still fulfill more than 25 orders, and I'll update the thread again once we run out or the weather turns too warm.

    For now, I expect to ship the next batch of rhizome orders late this week.
     
    Mark William
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    All order placed by yesterday, April 3, have been shipped.

    We are still having frosts and occasional snow here, which I expect until about May 1. For now, we can continue to dig and ship rhizome sets, but don't wait too long!
     
    Mark William
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    Last night we experienced what I expect will be our last frost here. If there is anyone else considering placing an order, please do so as soon as possible. There will probably just be one more rhizome digging this season!

    Thank you all for the orders so far!
     
    Posts: 67
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    Are these still available or is the season done?  I'm near Huntington, WV so probably not far from you.

    Also, what size does this variety typically get to?  Particularly outside diameter if the stalks?  Thanks.
     
    Mark William
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    Roy Ramey wrote:Are these still available or is the season done?  I'm near Huntington, WV so probably not far from you.

    Also, what size does this variety typically get to?  Particularly outside diameter if the stalks?  Thanks.



    I would be glad to accept one more order, but I will plan to edit the original post to end sales soon. There isn't new growth yet on the arundinaria but I expect it will start growing any time now and the received wisdom is to stop digging rhizomes by then.

    In my experience, the outside diameter is at most about 3/4 inch. The thicker culms are stout enough to serve as a fishing pole or as a beanpole, but they are not strong enough to serve structural purposes.

    As far as height, I have read that it can grow to 25 feet, but the largest ones in this area tend to be about 15 feet tall.
     
    Roy Ramey
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    Mark William wrote:

    Roy Ramey wrote:Are these still available or is the season done?  I'm near Huntington, WV so probably not far from you.

    Also, what size does this variety typically get to?  Particularly outside diameter if the stalks?  Thanks.



    I would be glad to accept one more order, but I will plan to edit the original post to end sales soon. There isn't new growth yet on the arundinaria but I expect it will start growing any time now and the received wisdom is to stop digging rhizomes by then.

    In my experience, the outside diameter is at most about 3/4 inch. The thicker culms are stout enough to serve as a fishing pole or as a beanpole, but they are not strong enough to serve structural purposes.

    As far as height, I have read that it can grow to 25 feet, but the largest ones in this area tend to be about 15 feet tall.



    Mark, thank you for the quick reply.  I know that time is of the essence right now.  However, I will need to pass this one up.  I have a variety which regularly gets 1.5" to 2", but I'm hoping to find a variety for here that will get a little larger than that to use for a little more of structural projects.  If you have or know of such a variety, then I'd be interested in that.  Thanks again.
     
    Mark William
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    Roy Ramey wrote:
    Mark, thank you for the quick reply.  I know that time is of the essence right now.  However, I will need to pass this one up.  I have a variety which regularly gets 1.5" to 2", but I'm hoping to find a variety for here that will get a little larger than that to use for a little more of structural projects.  If you have or know of such a variety, then I'd be interested in that.  Thanks again.




    You might look into Guadua Angustifolia, native to South America. I don't have any firsthand experience, but it seems like a better fit for your parameters. Good luck!
     
    Roy Ramey
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    Mark William wrote:

    Roy Ramey wrote:
    Mark, thank you for the quick reply.  I know that time is of the essence right now.  However, I will need to pass this one up.  I have a variety which regularly gets 1.5" to 2", but I'm hoping to find a variety for here that will get a little larger than that to use for a little more of structural projects.  If you have or know of such a variety, then I'd be interested in that.  Thanks again.




    You might look into Guadua Angustifolia, native to South America. I don't have any firsthand experience, but it seems like a better fit for your parameters. Good luck!



    Thank you so much.  I will look for this variety.
     
    Mark William
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    I was able to check on a rhizome set that we planted in our local area in March.

    It may be a little hard to see against this background, but I noticed that a little bit of green growth on two of the old culms. The rhizomes must be settling in well! This area has northwest exposure, but it is sheltered by a large boulder. It also is a fairly damp boulder which I think has been keeping the rhizomes moist even though the soil is shallow.

    I hope other folks start to see signs growth from their rhizomes as they come out of dormancy. It will take a couple years for the rhizomes to begin actively expanding, but should be settling in and producing some new growth this year as your temperatures come up.
    IMG_20220516_110322-2.jpg
    A little bit of new growth from a transplanted rhizome set
    A little bit of new growth from a transplanted rhizome set
     
    Mark William
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    I recently had an opportunity to visit the arboretum in Lexington, Kentucky which includes several plantings of Arundinaria gigantea.

    The most exciting is a relatively large canebrake of perhaps 1/2 or 3/4 an acre that is located under a canopy of mostly 30-35 year deciduous trees. These included the tallest giant river canes I have yet seen yet, at about 20 feet tall. At the arboretum I noticed that the Arundinaria growing in partial shade were taller than the cane growing in full sun.

    I took some photos which I thought I'd share.
    PXL_20221022_193856989.jpg
    [Thumbnail for PXL_20221022_193856989.jpg]
    PXL_20221022_194252169-2.jpg
    [Thumbnail for PXL_20221022_194252169-2.jpg]
    PXL_20221022_194306005.jpg
    [Thumbnail for PXL_20221022_194306005.jpg]
     
    steward
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    Mark, just curious about the edibility.  Have you tried eating the spring shoots, and if so, what did you think?  
     
    Mark William
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    Greg Martin wrote:Mark, just curious about the edibility.  Have you tried eating the spring shoots, and if so, what did you think?  



    I have not, but I have to admit I have only known about potential food uses for Arundinaria for a year or two. I have read that this species has been eaten by humans in general, but I can't attest to the palatability of the particular A. gigantea we are growing here -- yet!

    I have eaten bamboo shoots from a can thus far in life, so this thread may be where I post my first experience harvesting them fresh.
     
    Greg Martin
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    Will you sell them again this coming spring?  Then in the future I can report back too!  Very cool plants!
     
    Mark William
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    Greg Martin wrote:Will you sell them again this coming spring?  Then in the future I can report back too!  Very cool plants!



    Yes indeed, thank you for the interest! We're looking forward to offering rhizomes for sale once the temperatures consistently drop below freezing here. Hopefully by some point in December -- it's been a warm fall so far here.
     
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    Okay, so you start digging these up in Nov/Dec. Should these be planted then, too?
     
    Mark William
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    Tyler Blevins wrote:Okay, so you start digging these up in Nov/Dec. Should these be planted then, too?



    Yes, and thank you for asking. The rhizomes are ready to be planted as soon as possible once they arrive.

    In my own experience I have kept rhizomes alive for a couple of weeks by treating them like bare root trees -- shallowly burying or "heeling in" the roots, and making sure they don't completely dry out.
     
    Tyler Blevins
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    Mark William wrote:

    Tyler Blevins wrote:Okay, so you start digging these up in Nov/Dec. Should these be planted then, too?



    Yes, and thank you for asking. The rhizomes are ready to be planted as soon as possible once they arrive.

    In my own experience I have kept rhizomes alive for a couple of weeks by treating them like bare root trees -- shallowly burying or "heeling in" the roots, and making sure they don't completely dry out.



    Thank youuuuu. That is so helpful. I ordered a few rhizomes off eBay a month or so ago but was terrified of killing them by planting them outside just as freezing temps roll in. Of course now I'm afraid I killed them indoors anyhow. Might order from you and give it another go. I just had a really hard time finding information about how to grow them from rhizome outside academic papers from agricultural schools which are way higher tech than me. Thank you again for your overview.
     
    Mark William
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    I'm excited to say that I can now accept orders for the winter season!


    Photograph: Rhizomes after one season of growth
    Today I revisited the rhizomes I planted approximately nine months ago which are portrayed in the first post.

    The first photo attached to this post illustrates what a successful Arundinaria gigantea transplant should look like after a year. I don't want to jinx these canes, but based on its growth I believe this has established itself and will do well from here forward. I have a couple of transplants that aren't quite as full, but those plantings also have put on a couple of inches of growth over the last year on a few new culms.


    Photograph: Diameter of mature culms
    One of the questions that has come up a few times relates to how large the culms grow. This is a logical question if you are thinking of crafting or building with bamboo. The cane culms in the second photo are shown with a Sharpie marker for scale. Every once in a while culms grow bigger than these, but this size is relatively easy to find in a mature canebrake and they are a little bit larger than the marker.
    PXL_20221218_212742730(1).jpg
    Giant river cane transplant after one season of growth
    Giant river cane transplant after one season of growth
    original_a0cd7138-830a-4db0-8c59-e4a143a5fbdc_PXL_20221220_173336684.jpg
    Mature culms from a giant river cane, with Sharpie marker for scale
    Mature culms from a giant river cane, with Sharpie marker for scale
     
    Mark William
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    Today I received an order which was placed via affiliate link, which is to say that someone followed the instructions in the first post of this thread to generate a code.

    I had meant to set up the listing this winter in order to provide $5.13 in commission when someone helps me sell one order via an affiliate link, but I believe due to the way I had configured shipping prices behind the scenes, this person was awarded less than $4 in commission.

    I should have corrected things now, but if I would be more than glad to pay the difference if the person who I owe could get in contact. Sorry for that, and thank you to customers and affiliate-linkers!
     
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    Hi,

    I've been looking for a supplier of Arundinaria gigantea for some time. I'm in KY too and I am wanting to reintroduce the cane to my area. My house and acreage are located in a flood plain, so would it be fair to say I could plant it in most places and it would grow? I don't want to plant too far away from my house. There's a creek not far from the house, but I just know the deer will get it if I put it down there. Would appreciate the advice before I order.

    Thank you!
     
    Mark William
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    Kim Lockwood wrote:Hi,

    I've been looking for a supplier of Arundinaria gigantea for some time. I'm in KY too and I am wanting to reintroduce the cane to my area. My house and acreage are located in a flood plain, so would it be fair to say I could plant it in most places and it would grow? I don't want to plant too far away from my house. There's a creek not far from the house, but I just know the deer will get it if I put it down there. Would appreciate the advice before I order.



    Yes, if I were you I would also plant it near your house.

    I might avoid putting it right against the creek anyway, because while it should not dry out completely, soil that is usually wet or swampy can be too much wet.

    In case it's useful for you or someone else, I'm attaching a photo from Wikipedia of an arrangement I've also seen at the arboretum in Lexington Kentucky and in some local landscaping -- a clean edge that allows the cane to be integrated into a lawn or orchard.

    Please let me know if there's anything else I can add to help.
    Cane_P6200080_Ar.jpg
    Cane Ridge in Kentucky
    Cane Ridge in Kentucky
     
    pollinator
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    Mark William wrote:
    The most exciting is a relatively large canebrake of perhaps 1/2 or 3/4 an acre that is located under a canopy of mostly 30-35 year deciduous trees. These included the tallest giant river canes I have yet seen yet, at about 20 feet tall. At the arboretum I noticed that the Arundinaria growing in partial shade were taller than the cane growing in full sun.



    Very nice to see that they can handle some shade. I lack any full sun/moist soil areas but I do have a perfect spot for these on a forest edge that stays moist. So that leaves me with timing. The ground is frozen here in northern Missouri so should I wait to order? Or order now to hold my place with delayed shipping? Not sure how much you'll have available this year.  
     
    Mark William
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    Matt Todd wrote:
    Very nice to see that they can handle some shade. I lack any full sun/moist soil areas but I do have a perfect spot for these on a forest edge that stays moist. So that leaves me with timing. The ground is frozen here in northern Missouri so should I wait to order? Or order now to hold my place with delayed shipping? Not sure how much you'll have available this year.  



    Thanks for this question. If you would like to place an order, I am can hold it until either the last week of March or the first week of April and send it at that time.

    I am confident I am going to have enough rhizomes this season to meet demand, so I am mostly constrained by the climate. The person who I learned from only transplants during the times of year when there are still nights that get below freezing. I can count on occasional frost here up until the beginning of April, so I may continue after that, but it's hard to know.

    Last summer, I began experiments with transplanting rhizomes during other seasons in the hopes I can eventually offer that as an option. Maybe in another year or two I will have enough experience to talk about that, but for customers I am sticking with the proven approach of planting in the cold months.
     
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    Based on the weather, I've decided that April 15 will be the last day I accept orders.

    If the price is still $57 here in this thread, I'm still taking orders. Once I change it to $9,999 then sales are finished for the season.
     
    Mark William
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    Today I went into the middle of a section of mature Arundinaria gigantea cane in order to harvest garden poles. I find it quite beautiful to be surrounded by bamboo!

    While I was harvesting the poles, I thought I would dig up some rhizomes. Usually I dig river cane rhizomes from places where the cane is expanding and the rhizomes are about a year or two old. I also try to find places that have a layer of rock or clay a foot or so down. My experience today reminded me of some reasons why I prefer and would recommend harvesting rhizomes from younger growth on marginal soil!

    When the cane is growing in healthy, loose soil, the horizontal rhizomes can be as far as three feet below the surface. In addition to the extra digging this requires, large rhizomes are more fragile and tend to snap apart. I feel that large rhizomes also are more prone to drying out.

    I'm attaching one photo showing this mature stand of giant river cane, as well as another photo showing the relatively small amount of rhizome I was able to get after quite a bit of shovel work. If you look closely at the rhizomes I dug, you can see that it snapped apart in several places; I believe these small sections are viable, but because I do think they tend to dry out quickly I replanted them on the farm rather than packing them up for sale.

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    Dug rhizomes from mature giant river cane which have split into pieces
    Dug rhizomes from mature giant river cane which have split into pieces
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    Stand of giant river cane with full size mature culms
    Stand of giant river cane with full size mature culms
     
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    Hi Mark, i didn't see an option for buying a certain quantity, so i just placed separate orders. Let me know if that doesn't work for some reason.
     
    Mark William
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    Zach Grice wrote:Hi Mark, i didn't see an option for buying a certain quantity, so i just placed separate orders. Let me know if that doesn't work for some reason.



    Thank you very much, that works perfectly. I've learned as a result of this thread that the permies site is not programed (yet?) for ordering multiple items at once. You've done it exactly as it should be, and within about a week I'll email you with your USPS tracking information.
     
    Mark William
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    Towards the end of last week, my vehicle developed a mechanical issue and I have been mostly near the house. In general that is not a bad thing this time of year because there is plenty to do in the garden. That includes checking in on various 'experimental' transplanted Arundinaria rhizomes.

    The attached photo is the culm of a rhizome I transplanted in September 2022 from a source in South Carolina. In other words, I transplanted this individual near the height of summer when it was not dormant. The new growth is very encouraging to me, because it would be much more convenient if I could safely transplant rhizomes during other times of the year.

    As always I also have to bear in mind that our farm is just north of the geographical center of distribution of Arundinaria gigantea -- the area where I live may be about as close as possible to the perfect environment.  I can't assume that transplanted rhizomes will do as well in another place if they are moved during the summer, which is why sales will end in a few days.
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    Transplanted river cane with new growth
    Transplanted river cane with new growth
     
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    Mine are coming up now. I was so worried that the cold had killed them, but I also covered them with foam insulation panels for extra protection. Now there are 4 little culms coming up. I'm so stoked!
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    Mark William
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    I'm so excited to see these beauties settling in to their new environment. Thank you for posting photos!

    Here at the farm, I'm planning a trip to the river cane patch this weekend to fulfill remaining orders for this season. I'll leave orders available until then, but afterward orders will be on hold until the weather turns cold again. It has been very gratifying and a positive to offer our bamboo on these forums. I really enjoy being able to share this plant while getting paid for the work of digging and packing it.
     
    Mark William
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    I'm posting to clarify that sales have ended for this season. Thanks so much to our customers and folks who have posted in this thread. I expect to resume taking orders in December 2023, but I'll be keeping an eye on this thread in the meantime and sharing any photos or new information I'm particularly excited about.
     
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    I'm interested in trying it. I have identified a suitable spot on my land and want to confirm with someone more knowledgeable, as well as gain a greater understanding of its ecological niche / growing guild.

    I'm in the Ohio river watershed and I'm looking for plants to replace the ones I'm aggressively removing such as garlic mustard and honeysuckle.

    This is the spot as seen from upstream. A culvert under our suburban yard drains half the neighborhood into the forest next door. This tiny creeklet runs under our backyard fence, takes a 90 degree turn to run along the side yard, with gouging on one side of the turn and silting on the other, and bends its way down into the forest next door. We basically live on a dead-end street with suburbs on the left and forest on the right.

    We've installed extensions of the Kentucky board fence to prevent human intrusion into the creeklet, and the slopes along the creeklet banks are lined with riprap at about a 30-45 degree angle.
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    Mark William
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    I'm interested in trying it. I have identified a suitable spot on my land and want to confirm with someone more knowledgeable, as well as gain a greater understanding of its ecological niche / growing guild.

    I'm in the Ohio river watershed and I'm looking for plants to replace the ones I'm aggressively removing such as garlic mustard and honeysuckle.

    This is the spot as seen from upstream. A culvert under our suburban yard drains half the neighborhood into the forest next door. This tiny creeklet runs under our backyard fence, takes a 90 degree turn to run along the side yard, with gouging on one side of the turn and silting on the other, and bends its way down into the forest next door. We basically live on a dead-end street with suburbs on the left and forest on the right.

    We've installed extensions of the Kentucky board fence to prevent human intrusion into the creeklet, and the slopes along the creeklet banks are lined with riprap at about a 30-45 degree angle.



    I would be very excited if other folks would offer their perspectives on your situation, and I will share what I know from my experience with river cane in terms of environments and conditions where I have known it to succeed.

    My go-to image when thinking about incorporating river cane into a landscaped environment is this image from Cane Ridge in Kentucky, probably not that far from your location: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cane_P6200080_Ar.jpg

    I am not involved with that landscaping on Cane Ridge, but I can attest for the fact that seasonal use of loppers and periodic string trimming or mowing can keep river cane within a landscaped boundary as has been done in that photograph. Once river cane is well established, it seems to hold its own against honeysuckle vine, although I would not expect that even an established population would overtake honeysuckle unless it were under a forest canopy. I have never noticed garlic mustard growing within a mature canebrake, but on the other hand I can't rule out that those two species would coexist peacefully.

    Regarding honeysuckle vine, I do think that over time if the cane is protected from honeysuckle, it might slowly creep into the shade of the forest. Mature forest understory of the Ohio River Valley is one of its native habitats, but that would take years or decades to expand very far.

    I personally have river cane growing near several culverts. It was not until your post that I thought about whether they would be a threat to culverts, but my instinct is that the river cane rhizomes aren't strong enough to damage culverts. Often river cane is found in the wild here along remote highways and railroad right of ways, and I can't say I've ever noticed it damaging that kind of infrastructure with its roots.

    Please let me know if there is more that I can say to help you with the scenario.
     
    Matt Todd
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    Satisfied customer! I cleared a bit of ground where they would stay moist but still get a bit of sun. Planted the rhizomes on April 1st. Now May 17th, I'm seeing the first sprouts. So excited to have a native bamboo, because I always wanted some cane but dismissed the possibility since usually you can only find invasive non-native.
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    Mark William
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    I have opened up sales through the end of May 5, 2024.

    There have been big changes at the farm this year, and I regret that I was not able to fulfill mail orders over the winter months.

    In terms of my field observations, river cane seemed to be growing slower than in 2021 or 2022 which I am attributing to a dry spell in the middle of the season last year. Thankfully the nearby river cane transplants that I've visited recently seem to be healthy.
     
    Mark William
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    I'm grateful to have received several orders. Yesterday I thought I would be able to do some digging, but bands of heavy rain thwarted me.

    I did get a chance to take a few photos of the edge of the patch where I am digging rhizomes this year. I'm also planning to take a few more photos portraying the amount of rhizomes that go into each priority mail box, if I don't forget. I am trying to develop better habits about photographing work while it's in-progress.

    As you can see in one of these In this case, River Cane does grow almost all the way down to the creek. Usually it stays in the floodplain above the creek or river where its roots don't stay wet. Maybe it gets close to the creek here because it's relatively small, and it is growing down a fairly steep slope.
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    Mark William
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    I've filled orders placed through April 29, but unfortunately I was not able to get any additional photos showing how much goes into an order.

    The main reason being I trim the culms and pack them into boxes, and it happens out of the back of my vehicle along an unpaved road. This is relevant because I couldn't find a backdrop to place the rhizomes on where they didn't blend ambiguously into the soil or turf or dirt road below them in the photo.

    If I want to do this I should bring a big sheet of cardboard or something similar so that it's possible to clearly see the rhizomes.

    That said, I was thrilled to find a very promising clue about propagating this species. In reading the literature on A. gigantea and getting advice on propagation, I have heard speculation that it might be possible to propagate giant river cane by bending a culm down to the ground and weighing it down with a rock. Some bamboo species will reportedly root into the ground when treated this way, but the literature on Arundinaria doesn't include anything about it.

    I noticed a few culms being held tightly against the soil by a large fallen limb, and I could clearly distinguish new root development at the nodes. I would guess the culms were held against the ground 6-10 months but I'm not expert enough to really say.

    I'm looking forward to experimenting with this in the future. It seems like once a planting has reached the stage of growth where it has several healthy culms, this process could increase the rate that it expands. I haven't grown other bamboo, but I do get the impression that Arundinaria gigantea is among the slower growers in its category.
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