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A Map to find decent & Cheap land  RSS feed

 
Posts: 32
Location: Snowbird Nomad
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My hope is that you may find this map useful if you are searching for land in the USA:

My criteria that I used on this map:
1. The land must receive at least 25 to 30 inches of rain per year. This means that anywhere west of the middle of the USA (middle of kansas) is off limits because the tools required to green the desert may be a bit too daunting for those without grants or organizational backing.
2. The land must be affordable (2000$ an acre or so).
3. I want to have privacy. No neighbors in eye-shot. 10 people per square mile or less.
4. An extended growing season (personal preference. I prefer to be able to grow stuff for as long as possible, without sacrificing other aspects of life)
5. Very few/no wildfires (sorry north Idaho and western Montana)
6. The land in question must be away from active mining, fracking and other processing factories. (Avoid pollution and having you land taken for mineral rights issues)

The final results are...(within the given areas on the map, duh)
-Arkansas: Lots of gas and oil operations. If you stay towards the center of the state you should be OK though. look at the maps I've linked.
-Pretty much all of Missouri is fine.
-West Virginia: Decided to cross off the list; too many gas, oil and coal operations.
-Kentucky: Be careful. look at the maps I've linked. If you stay towards the center of the state you should be OK though.
-The southern portion of Virginia is fine; cheap and no gas, oil and coal operations.
-Alabama: Stay towards the center counties on the designated area and you should be alright.

Watch this too...https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yX9NlKdyr-0

My top pick is Missouri, thus far. The wildfire issue can be managed somewhat; they aren't terribly common like they are in Idaho, but they still happen. It's like preparing for hurricanes if you live on the coast, or tornadoes if you live on the plains.
You might want to consider humidity if you are thinking about Alabama.
So long as you are avoiding the cities, you avoid most of the problems.
I've also been considering New Hampshire due to the low pollution, high quality of life and low political corruption. The downside? It's colder, shorter growing season, and land is bit more expensive. Probably worth it though.

Here's a link to all of the maps: (I don't want this post to be a million miles long)
https://imgur.com/a/3EHJHbM
These are my considerations, you might have different ones.
 
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Very interesting.  Thanks for your efforts!
 
pollinator
Posts: 528
Location: Western Washington
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I think this map is a great start, and you clearly put a lot of thought into it. You bring up some excellent points on other limiting factors. I have some thoughts:


I made a major oversight in my search for land. I wanted to be more remote, not less. But luckily my partner wanted to be closer to town and we compromised. Even so, we’re still pretty far out. It can get pretty lonely, and finding services (including farm-related services like tractorwork) can be hard sometimes, or expensive. It really is impossible to do everything yourself. I’m 23 and in decent shape in every way measurable, and even I can’t and don’t do everything on my farm. It can also be lonely. People are busy and get caught up in their own things.


We often dream of self sufficiency as homesteaders, but the reality is that it took a whole village to really do things and live comfortably back in the day. If I had time there are all sorts of things I would get into like mushroom cultivation and clothmaking. But my time is limited, so I don’t do those things. I focus on other things. It is true, back in the day people had a wide range of skills, but they often specialized in a few certain things and didn’t have in depth knowledge on specialized trades. The average person didn’t know about advanced herbalism or blacksmithing, for example. Pioneers did “make it” in small groups and families, but life was very, very hard and their hope was that that was only temporary, and that life would get easier as things got more “settled” and more people moved out.

 
Posts: 9
Location: North central Illinois
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James Landreth wrote:I think this map is a great start, and you clearly put a lot of thought into it. You bring up some excellent points on other limiting factors. I have some thoughts:


I made a major oversight in my search for land. I wanted to be more remote, not less. But luckily my partner wanted to be closer to town and we compromised. Even so, we’re still pretty far out. It can get pretty lonely, and finding services (including farm-related services like tractorwork) can be hard sometimes, or expensive. It really is impossible to do everything yourself. I’m 23 and in decent shape in every way measurable, and even I can’t and don’t do everything on my farm. It can also be lonely. People are busy and get caught up in their own things.


We often dream of self sufficiency as homesteaders, but the reality is that it took a whole village to really do things and live comfortably back in the day. If I had time there are all sorts of things I would get into like mushroom cultivation and clothmaking. But my time is limited, so I don’t do those things. I focus on other things. It is true, back in the day people had a wide range of skills, but they often specialized in a few certain things and didn’t have in depth knowledge on specialized trades. The average person didn’t know about advanced herbalism or blacksmithing, for example. Pioneers did “make it” in small groups and families, but life was very, very hard and their hope was that that was only temporary, and that life would get easier as things got more “settled” and more people moved out.


Hi, I just wanted to let you know about something that can help with both the isolation ( loneliness- cuz people dont realize that just going places yourself, if you even have the time & $, isnt always enough. One needs people, more than just even a great spouse- to share their home & interests ( tangible ones like a project ya got going on) with others, at least some of time) & need ( use for) for help. Workaway.info . We've had 4 come stay with us last year ( different times) & all were great experiences. Totally free to sign up with & use, as least as a host it is. Easy to use site. Totally love it !
 
Luke Furgason
Posts: 32
Location: Snowbird Nomad
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James Landreth wrote: It really is impossible to do everything yourself.  


We need others to buy our stuff, or pay us for our services, indeed.

James Landreth wrote: I’m 23 and in decent shape in every way measurable, and even I can’t and don’t do everything on my farm. It can also be lonely.  


I don't get lonely. I've been depressed before for weeks, but I've never been lonely. My sadness is brought on by living in suburbia; too many people and the bullshit that comes along with them. Guess we differ on that.

James Landreth wrote: We often dream of self sufficiency as homesteaders, but the reality is that it took a whole village to really do things and live comfortably back in the day.  


But they where still plowing the soil and knew nothing about permaculture!

James Landreth wrote: If I had time there are all sorts of things I would get into like mushroom cultivation and clothmaking.


Mushrooms are hella easy; buy a plug on amazon and put it into the soil. Just make sure you get the right one though.
 
Luke Furgason
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AN UPDATE TO THIS POST:
While most of Missouri is great, the southern central portion of Virginia is probably my top pick. It's just far enough away from people to have access to stuff while maintaining privacy, security and affordability. Check out the areas in and around Charlotte County, VA. As of writing this I am preparing to live as a nomad, I'll be doing vlogs on that over on my youtube channel:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCM8TD3xOXKFaguSmZJWxCTQ
 
pollinator
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You Americans don't know how lucky you are.  Cheap land and decent climate.  Anyone want to marry me?
 
master steward
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Timothy Markus wrote:You Americans don't know how lucky you are.  Cheap land and decent climate.  Anyone want to marry me?


Here's the singles section: Permaculture Singles
 
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Luke Furgason wrote:AN UPDATE TO THIS POST:
While most of Missouri is great, the southern central portion of Virginia is probably my top pick. It's just far enough away from people to have access to stuff while maintaining privacy, security and affordability. Check out the areas in and around Charlotte County, VA. As of writing this I am preparing to live as a nomad, I'll be doing vlogs on that over on my youtube channel:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCM8TD3xOXKFaguSmZJWxCTQ [/quote

My farm is on the Southside of Virginia in Halifax County. If anyone has any questions or specific concerns about the area, I will be glad to try to help you.

 
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So how do you define 'cheap land'.
I prefer to use a term, 'economical' , because sometimes 'cheap' is really bad.

Plus, anything may be priced such that somebody can buy and others cannot, so a universal 'cheapnest' will not apply.

I wonder if ' low cost' is a better descriptor to use, in that it is not realative to afforability?
 
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