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I love a volunteer plant!

 
pollinator
Posts: 189
Location: Piedmont 7a
55
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Went out to the compose pile yesterday, and what do I find but a lovely volunteer!  Not sure what it is - any sharp eyes out there?  Guessing either a cucumber, melon, or maybe acorn or butternut squash.
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Volunteer in compost
 
gardener
Posts: 1058
Location: Maine, zone 5
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Hmmm....I'm going to go with one of the Cucurbita maxima types, though not sure.  Here's a link to a nice how to identify squash page by our super resource Joseph Lofthouse.  He may swoop in to give you a much more reliable answer.  I guessed based on the leaf margins and this picture of Joseph's, though there are a few differences.
 
master steward
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Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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Lacking a peduncle, fruit, or flower, I'm thinking that it's a maxima squash (buttercup, banana, hubbard, kobocha, sweet meat, etc)
 
gardener
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Location: Galicia, Spain zone 9a
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I have volunteer potatoes in my chestnut tree pot. They may have to go....
 
pollinator
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This Japanese Maple was a volunteer last year and it made it through the winter.  In the top left you can see some volunteer asparagus.  I must have dropped some seeds last year.  I don't have a picture but I had a bunch of perennial strawberries come up this year.  The bed doubled in size.  
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Japanese Maple and asparagus
 
garden master
Posts: 791
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
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I have some volunteer Japanese maples too and tons of crepe myrtles, they are two really nice looking plants to me.

I love it when they have lots of new little plants!
 
Posts: 388
Location: Roseburg, Oregon
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I love volunteers! My quest in gardening is to try and find/breed semi feral crops that come back or stay for several years.

I grow potatoes this way. Plant 1 year then harvest forever.
 
No matter how many women are assigned to the project, a pregnancy takes nine months. Much longer than this tiny ad:
3 Plant Types You Need to Know: Perennial, Biennial, and Annual
https://permies.com/t/96847/Pros-cons-perennial-biennial-annual
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