Win a bunch of tools from Truly Garden and Loma Creek! this week in the Gear forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • James Freyr
  • Mike Haasl
  • paul wheaton
  • Dave Burton
stewards:
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Joseph Lofthouse
garden masters:
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Steve Thorn
  • Eric Hanson

SWF, 41-The fish in my pond don't like living off grid.

 
Posts: 45
Location: Corinth, KY
forest garden fungi homestead
  • Likes 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm not even sure if I'm ready to date yet. I'm still healing from a previous relationship but I do miss the companionship of another. Just thought I would throw a line out there and see if there are any fish that like to swim in my end of the pond. Then I have to figure out if the fish are my type. If I had to choose a fish I would choose one that is colorful, easy-going, adaptable, able to sustain its lifestyle. In other words, "have your sh*t together", aka, not be a bum and live off of other people and give nothing in return. Wow this went south fast. Obviously setting boundaries is a weakness of mine. I told you I'm still healing. Anyways, I guess I'm just looking for a friend first. I'm not willing to move at this point in my life. I have a beautiful paradise in Kentucky and I'm starting this journey on my own.

I'm in the process of building my own house with the help of my brother and after I'm finished with my pole barn, I will be embarking on building my dream house...cob/strawbale hybrid. I did an apprenticeship on building with cob and have taken a permaculture design class, grew up on a farm and love staring at trees. I have one grown daughter who is "kind of" on her own so now its time to do something for me and that's creating a sustainable life in the woods. I have a daytime job until I can sustain my lifestyle with various incomes coming from the land (workshops, BnB, harvesting, anything else I can do to make a living).

I'm an INFP and #9 on the Enneagram if that means anything to anyone.

I'm really a nice person, although I may not articulate it in my post or I try to come off funny and it ends up being awkward. I'm just a little banged up but aren't we all?
 
pollinator
Posts: 670
Location: Ontario, Canada
144
homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Diane, I think you come across just fine and I get where you're coming from and what kind of person you're looking for.  I've found it very difficult to find someone with a similar outlook while in an urban environment and I'm hoping my move to the sticks will make it easier to find what I'm looking for, though it may backfire ;)

I totally get why you'd want to stay in Kentucky; if I had a choice of climate and beauty, I'd look to settle in Kentucky, Tennessee or North Carolina.  I hope you find the right partner.
 
Diane Maldonado
Posts: 45
Location: Corinth, KY
forest garden fungi homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
He'll Timothy!

Thank you! I was worried about it because who really has all their ducks in a row? I guess the type I've been used to is not really a good definition of an adult. Lol you know like paying for bills, be able to support yourself without mooching off of others. But you live and you learn. I'm an optimist and believe we go through things so we can gain valuable lessons. I've been thankful for all my challenges.

Yes living in an urban environment is hard especially if you want to live off grid. I lived in the suburbs once and I hated it. I felt like I was suffocating but that's because I grew up on a farm.

I don't think your plans will backfire. I've had setbacks many times which some consider backfire but I just keep chugging away until I get it right. I'm very determined and if the off grid lifestyle is really what you want then go for it. Regrets only come from things you didn't do not the risks that you take. Well some may disagree. Lol

Tennessee and North Carolina are beautiful states as well. You can't go wrong with any of those three although I am biased.

I also wish you well on your journey!
 
pollinator
Posts: 377
Location: Clemson, SC ("new" Zone 8a)
41
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Diane Maldonado wrote:...I've had setbacks many times which some consider backfire but I just keep chugging away until I get it right. I'm very determined and if the off grid lifestyle is really what you want then go for it. Regrets only come from things you didn't do not the risks that you take. Well some may disagree. Lol



Well said, Diane!  You just summed up my own homesteading attempts in a nutshell: setbacks, determination, more setbacks, and just keep chugging along, LOL!

I am just about exactly your age, and I don't blame you for saying "enough of this BS, its time to partner myself with another adult."  My own GF and potential future homesteading partner is much younger (going on 26), sometimes rather immature, and suffering from clinical depression.  While she doesn't "bum off of me," at least not financially speaking, I am growing rather impatient to see her get her own shit together.  Otherwise, it remains hard for me to believe that she could someday become the wife and mother I would need her to be.  So I see no reason for you to lower your standards, nor apologize for being up front about them.

Running a homestead is surely a job for two, make no mistake about it.  And I garden from a wheelchair, so you can imagine how impossible the prospect of going solo looks from my perspective!  Yet I believe that you'd be better off starting out solo, as hard as that would be, than with someone else who is merely a dead weight.

And make no mistake about this, too: we permies, sadly, exhibit more than our fair share of bums, moochers, and just generally immature personalities who will not satisfy the criteria you set for a partner.  I've met a lot.  Every August I attend a permaculture gathering in western NC.  It would be a long drive for you, but you really should attend, so check it out: http://www.southeasternpermaculture.org/.  To be clear, I absolutely love it, and I love the people I meet there.  But based on my observations of all the permie types I've met along the way, there is a reason permies have gained a reputation as "hippy dreamers."  Especially the younger ones.  They have big hearts, and crazy beards, and lofty ideals... and damned little to show for all their dreams.

The primary problem seems to be that many think living sustainably has something to do with sitting around stoned half of the time.  Go figure.

BTW, on a tangential note: if the case happens to be that you are not suffering from mental illness yourself, then you should add that to your self-description, above.  Seriously.  That alone would set you apart from the majority of 21st Century American women.

Also, just FYI, I did a lot of online dating in my younger years, and I can tell you from experience that adding photos to your post - several good photos of yourself, plus of your land - will lead people to take you much more seriously.  Men especially, as we are visual creatures.

Anyway, I would love to talk about your homesteading plans, and particularly the design and construction of your cob/straw bale hybrid home.  The centerpiece of my own suburban-scale homestead is a passive solar straw bale home of my own design.  It isn't finished yet, but I've been working on it for a lot of years.  I am already confident from observing its performance (even unfinished), that I will live comfortably through South Carolina summers without air conditioning; I am not installing one.  So, I call that a green building win!  Now, I'm not off grid, as it sounds like you plan to be, so I could install AC if needed.  But I just love getting those charts from the power company showing my bill at $30/month through the summer while my neighbors' usage shoots up to $200+  ; )

I would be very interested to see your building and site plans, if you've gotten that far.  I'd say we should meet someday, but with a 7-hour drive between that's probably unlikely to happen.  But respond or send a PM if you'd like to talk any further.  Best of luck with all of your plans, and with finding the right partner with whom to pursue them!
 
Diane Maldonado
Posts: 45
Location: Corinth, KY
forest garden fungi homestead
  • Likes 8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I can't edit my original post but I would like to clarify that I am not suffering from any mental illness...maybe visionary disease. For those of you unfamiliar with this sort of disease-its where you have all these dreams but time, money and doing it solo are the biggest hindrances. I do not take any medications for any health problems and I don't go from angel to devil in .2 seconds because someone left a towel on the ground.

Now the controversial stuff...I believe in monogamy and loyalty provided my partner puts in as much as effort as I do. I won't cheat I'll just kick you to the curb. I grew up Catholic but consider myself more spiritual. There is truth and good deeds in all religions and non-religions. Politically I'm all over the place. I don't agree with either side 100%.-Both sides are just the same anyways.  I'm much more complex than putting myself in a category. I'm open minded and accepting of everyone...except pedophiles. I may disagree with you but it doesn't mean I can't be your friend.  Now that some of you self-eliminated yourselves, if you stick around then welcome to the party. Or just a bonfire and some s'mores and good music. lol
IMG_0098.JPG
Photo of a lady
me.jpg
Photo of a lady
20150524_172540.jpg
woodland
1432520672937.jpg
[Thumbnail for 1432520672937.jpg]
IMG_2400.JPG
driveway
 
Matthew Nistico
pollinator
Posts: 377
Location: Clemson, SC ("new" Zone 8a)
41
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Haha, are those your toes stretched out before a campfire?!  : )

You look very nice, as does your land.  How many acres?  What are you hoping to do with the land once your house is completed?

I agree with you about politics: the two parties make such a show of their differences, yet most party members don't comprehend (nor are they willing to admit) that in many ways they are two sides of the same coin.  I refer to myself as libertarian with socialist leanings.  So hard to fit inside just one box!

My GF and I are currently inhabiting a space of responsible non-monogamy, a first for both of us.  Over a year into that phase of our relationship, and things seem to be working out.  We will see in the future both if we want to continue and exactly what kind of non-monogamous lifestyle we wish to lead.  Personally, I find most people's concept of traditional monogamy too commingled with jealousy for my taste, but if you can make it work for you and your partner then great for you.

Keep the pics coming.  I promise you: the more you post, the more people will take an interest.

Best wishes!
 
Diane Maldonado
Posts: 45
Location: Corinth, KY
forest garden fungi homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Matthew Nistico wrote:Haha, are those your toes stretched out before a campfire?!  : )

You look very nice, as does your land.  How many acres?  What are you hoping to do with the land once your house is completed?

I agree with you about politics: the two parties make such a show of their differences, yet most party members don't comprehend (nor are they willing to admit) that in many ways they are two sides of the same coin.  I refer to myself as libertarian with socialist leanings.  So hard to fit inside just one box!

My GF and I are currently inhabiting a space of responsible non-monogamy, a first for both of us.  Over a year into that phase of our relationship, and things seem to be working out.  We will see in the future both if we want to continue and exactly what kind of non-monogamous lifestyle we wish to lead.  Personally, I find most people's concept of traditional monogamy too commingled with jealousy for my taste, but if you can make it work for you and your partner then great for you.

Keep the pics coming.  I promise you: the more you post, the more people will take an interest.

Best wishes!



Lol yes I have Hobbit feet and can grow cabbage into between my toes. Hehe

Thank you for the compliments. I'm very proud of my land. I have 20 acres and it's mostly wooded and maybe 2 acres of that is flat open space. I sent you a message on what I plan to do with my land. But short story short, harvest my bounty,  teach workshops and have a BnB.

So I do have strong opinions on monogamy and open relationships which I won't get into. But I think if it works for you and your partners then who am I to tell you how to live. It's just not my cup of tea. Some of my upbringing has been engrained into me along with Disney and romance novels warping my expectations. I'm fully aware of the difference between fantasy and a relationship which take a lot of work. Hell I can't even get one decent guy let alone two. Too much work with two guys. Lol
 
Posts: 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi, Diane, I'm Timothy or Timo and I accidentally found this site while exploring small scale threshing machines.  I live in Tollesboro, KY, about 12 east of Maysville, KY, because nobody has ever heard of Tollesboro.  Actually I am 4 miles north of Tollesboro, out in a hollow called Poplar Flat where I have 18 acres, a house and a pole barn and 5 cats, all of which I own free and clear except for the cats who only give their friendship to people who love them.

I am a retired structural engineer, 72, and built my own house after being laid off in 2012, I have lived all over the mid West and visited various foreign countries and States in our Union during my working career.  I was married and divorced twice and have no kids.

I am not off the grid but working at being more self sufficient, I harvest rain for my water supply and heat my pole barn with fire wood.  The chimney on the main house will be done this year and then I will be able to heat the house with local fire wood as well.  I have a garden which I am trying to defend against the raccoons with a good fence this year.  Four peach trees were planted last year and the first asparagus crop is due next Spring.  There is no zoning in this part of Kentucky so I did all the plumbing and wiring in my house, no inspections were required, I am a veteran of 6 years in the Nuclear Navy so I knew what I was doing.

I live by myself (except for the cats) but it would be nice to have a companion who has a similar interests and outlook on life.
SAM_0264.JPG
a recent picture
a recent picture
Aug-24-2018-1.JPG
my house
my house
Dec-18-2018.JPG
the pole barn on a cool morning
the pole barn on a cool morning
 
Posts: 39
1
forest garden rocket stoves ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
!
 
Posts: 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Barefoot alot?
"What's your sign?" [grin] (star/zodiac)
 
Posts: 6
Location: Zone 9b
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Diane, Steve here. If you haven't found what your looking for please let me know. I'm about to make a major life change and I believe we might be able to create a symbiosis. As for being able to support myself I'm more than capable. I'm definitely not looking for a handout or a leg up.
 
Posts: 8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hello, I live in Ky, and have been living off grid for 10 years. I'm looking for a friend, partner, and soulmate. I'm a veteran. I'm the outdoors, nature loving type. I'm a very caring , and giving man, so if you would like to chat, I'm here.
IMG_20181028_154931449.jpg
Photo of a man
 
Posts: 1
building woodworking homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Good Evening Diane,
I just wanted to let you know I sent you a Purple Mooseage.
Thanks,
Justin
 
Posts: 123
Location: Gaines County, Texas South of Seminole, Tx zone 7b/8a
15
dog trees greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I find it the same out here in western Texas to find someone willing to go off grid and be more self sustaining as well.  I love you land it has a lot more shade then the mesquite that I have here on my land that I have been working on now for 4 years.   I too am looking for a good partner or friend that would like to live and work on being less reliant on the current economy as things right now seem to look as it in itself is becoming unstable with changes going on.  

I have a stable job as a Jailer out here.  Almost debt free as I have less then a year on my Truck to pay off and then speed up and pay my last of my other loans shortly after as well.  Land been paid off for year.  Then I can really focus more investment on the land here or if I decide to find better less challenging land to work with that has more to offer.  Other then that I manage to get stuff on my own until I find the right fish out in this dry pond.
20180519_220847.jpg
2018 picture. I rarely take pictures of myself.
2018 picture. I rarely take pictures of myself.
 
Diane Maldonado
Posts: 45
Location: Corinth, KY
forest garden fungi homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hello Timo. Thanks for your message and nice to meet you. I have actually heard of Tollesboro and actually looked for land there once. I’m glad to see you are working your way to an off grid lifestyle as I am. It does take a lot of hard work but it is very rewarding.

I wish you much success in your journey.

Timo Wiley wrote:Hi, Diane, I'm Timothy or Timo and I accidentally found this site while exploring small scale threshing machines.  I live in Tollesboro, KY, about 12 east of Maysville, KY, because nobody has ever heard of Tollesboro.  Actually I am 4 miles north of Tollesboro, out in a hollow called Poplar Flat where I have 18 acres, a house and a pole barn and 5 cats, all of which I own free and clear except for the cats who only give their friendship to people who love them.

I am a retired structural engineer, 72, and built my own house after being laid off in 2012, I have lived all over the mid West and visited various foreign countries and States in our Union during my working career.  I was married and divorced twice and have no kids.

I am not off the grid but working at being more self sufficient, I harvest rain for my water supply and heat my pole barn with fire wood.  The chimney on the main house will be done this year and then I will be able to heat the house with local fire wood as well.  I have a garden which I am trying to defend against the raccoons with a good fence this year.  Four peach trees were planted last year and the first asparagus crop is due next Spring.  There is no zoning in this part of Kentucky so I did all the plumbing and wiring in my house, no inspections were required, I am a veteran of 6 years in the Nuclear Navy so I knew what I was doing.

I live by myself (except for the cats) but it would be nice to have a companion who has a similar interests and outlook on life.

 
Diane Maldonado
Posts: 45
Location: Corinth, KY
forest garden fungi homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My sign says move along! Lol just kidding. I used to barefoot until I lost my sixth toe. Well only part of that is true. I’m an Aries/Taurus cuspian. But I don’t let that define me. I’m much more complicated. Lol

Budge Muller wrote:Barefoot alot?
"What's your sign?" [grin] (star/zodiac)

 
Diane Maldonado
Posts: 45
Location: Corinth, KY
forest garden fungi homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
In all honesty I haven’t found what I’m looking for. But I really haven’t been looking either. It’s been on the back burner while I assess what I’m really looking for. I’m not really looking at a timeline either. I think just a friend right now and hopefully that can turn into something more. I want to build a friendship up more. It takes the pressure off and let the other person be themselves without worrying if they are accepted enough to hop into bed with them. I would really like to find my soul mate if anyone believes in that stuff anymore. I’m guessing I’m going through a phase right now after watching the outlander. Lol call it unrealistic but I believe there are couples that can have that type relationship...well without all the sword fights and treason. Lol sorry I just rambled on. Lol

Steven Hendrickson wrote:Hi Diane, Steve here. If you haven't found what your looking for please let me know. I'm about to make a major life change and I believe we might be able to create a symbiosis. As for being able to support myself I'm more than capable. I'm definitely not looking for a handout or a leg up.

 
Diane Maldonado
Posts: 45
Location: Corinth, KY
forest garden fungi homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator


Hello James. Where are the trees!?!?

James Everett wrote:I find it the same out here in western Texas to find someone willing to go off grid and be more self sustaining as well.  I love you land it has a lot more shade then the mesquite that I have here on my land that I have been working on now for 4 years.   I too am looking for a good partner or friend that would like to live and work on being less reliant on the current economy as things right now seem to look as it in itself is becoming unstable with changes going on.  

I have a stable job as a Jailer out here.  Almost debt free as I have less then a year on my Truck to pay off and then speed up and pay my last of my other loans shortly after as well.  Land been paid off for year.  Then I can really focus more investment on the land here or if I decide to find better less challenging land to work with that has more to offer.  Other then that I manage to get stuff on my own until I find the right fish out in this dry pond.

 
Posts: 36
4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
You sound very interesting but I am slightly lost on the fish metaphor.
 
James Everett
Posts: 123
Location: Gaines County, Texas South of Seminole, Tx zone 7b/8a
15
dog trees greening the desert
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
West Texas and Trees were taken out by farmers many years ago to make crops and put in live stock.  Most of what is coming in now on my land is from me allowing them to take back over and most of it is Mesquite.  I do see some Elm, Lotebush, Hack berry, Soap berry.  As I get more work done on my land I am working on establishing more varieties of stuff and as landscapers move in debris I am hoping for a seed or to to take off on their own.  As far as getting trees establish will be determines on how well they root through caliche.
20190715_211239.jpg
Front yard area I am working on.
Front yard area I am working on.
20190502_154009.jpg
what most of my yard looks like.
what most of my yard looks like.
 
Diane Maldonado
Posts: 45
Location: Corinth, KY
forest garden fungi homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Comparing it to the fish in the sea metaphor.


Terry Waller wrote:You sound very interesting but I am slightly lost on the fish metaphor.

 
Posts: 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hello Diane, I can relate to a lot on your post, been doing all my own work plumbing, electrical, construction and hire helpers as needed, would be great to have a partner to work with towards a common goal of self sufficiency, I have land in Nevada with waters wells, a bit hot in the summer 118. Been looking at Kentucky, any lakes or rivers close to you?
 
Diane Maldonado
Posts: 45
Location: Corinth, KY
forest garden fungi homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Daniel Sandoval wrote:Hello Diane, I can relate to a lot on your post, been doing all my own work plumbing, electrical, construction and hire helpers as needed, would be great to have a partner to work with towards a common goal of self sufficiency, I have land in Nevada with waters wells, a bit hot in the summer 118. Been looking at Kentucky, any lakes or rivers close to you?



Well I am partial to Kentucky. There are many lakes in Kentucky and of course there is the Ohio river although I don't recommend eating any fish from it. There are a few smaller lakes like Williamstown and Corinth lake that people can take their boats out on. There's also Lake Cumberland, Dale Hollow lake and Cave Run Lake. There are a lot more but I'm more familiar with those. Cave Run is really nice and its situated in the Daniel Boone National Forest and boasts of great hiking trails and camping in Red River Gorge. Let me know if you are interested in more about Kentucky. I'd love to talk about it as well as sustainability.
 
Posts: 3
Location: Toivola, Michigan
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I feel for ya. I’m 59, a semi-retired Science Prof who is “re-homesteading” 100 yo farm in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. Thus far my pond appears totally fishless. Your pics and everything look great. The issue may well be due to societal changes. Trying to sell my home in the mountains of Colorado, an awesome place with an incredible view where I reclaimed the 5 ac of land with native trees and other vegetation, built outbuildings, raised beds, mini greenhouses, cleaned up a lot of crap, upclassed and upgraded the home. Since I’m an active and very educated person who has nothing to do with pop culture, I looked for the same in a partner. Most men, not dummies or druggies by any stretch, thought burning wood and wood pellets rather than burning gas for heat, having chickens, growing food, exercising, was “too hard and too radical”. I kid you not. Dudes willingly ski in avalanche conditions, climb routes so hard they’re sore for a month but helping with firewood or clearing snow is “too hard”. Though this house is very reasonably priced and is rare in that I have acreage so close to town, folk want little, no maintainable disposable ski homes they don’t have to care about or tend.
I started building my self reliance skills at 17 when I bailed out of a dysfunctional suburban family and headed north. Sadly, now most folk simply have little/no skill set anymore, nor, given today’s obesity epidemic, do they have the health or stamina to do anything remotely close to homesteading. In the UP, I’m in a very small and spread out community and while there are some that’d like to help, it’s the same deal, they’re unhealthy. The Midwestern diet does no one any favors. I refuse to abandon this farm so I’m trying to do everything solo and I help out the one fellow off grid couple. Since you’re much younger and in a different region, you may want to try Planet Earth Singles. Do keep in mind that some on that site are not really interested in homesteading but are guys on the edge, looking for a home and meal ticket. Yep, someday I’d hope to meet a fellow academic interested in staying healthy and throwing away what passes for society but I’m not holding my breath and nor should you. I keep getting stuff repaired task by task, generally while singing the classics then take a well earned rest by reading good literature by kerosene lamp in front of a warm fire. Don’t give up your dream.
 
Diane Maldonado
Posts: 45
Location: Corinth, KY
forest garden fungi homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Miskwa Yellowknife wrote:I feel for ya. I’m 59, a semi-retired Science Prof who is “re-homesteading” 100 yo farm in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. Thus far my pond appears totally fishless. Your pics and everything look great. The issue may well be due to societal changes. Trying to sell my home in the mountains of Colorado, an awesome place with an incredible view where I reclaimed the 5 ac of land with native trees and other vegetation, built outbuildings, raised beds, mini greenhouses, cleaned up a lot of crap, upclassed and upgraded the home. Since I’m an active and very educated person who has nothing to do with pop culture, I looked for the same in a partner. Most men, not dummies or druggies by any stretch, thought burning wood and wood pellets rather than burning gas for heat, having chickens, growing food, exercising, was “too hard and too radical”. I kid you not. Dudes willingly ski in avalanche conditions, climb routes so hard they’re sore for a month but helping with firewood or clearing snow is “too hard”. Though this house is very reasonably priced and is rare in that I have acreage so close to town, folk want little, no maintainable disposable ski homes they don’t have to care about or tend.
I started building my self reliance skills at 17 when I bailed out of a dysfunctional suburban family and headed north. Sadly, now most folk simply have little/no skill set anymore, nor, given today’s obesity epidemic, do they have the health or stamina to do anything remotely close to homesteading. In the UP, I’m in a very small and spread out community and while there are some that’d like to help, it’s the same deal, they’re unhealthy. The Midwestern diet does no one any favors. I refuse to abandon this farm so I’m trying to do everything solo and I help out the one fellow off grid couple. Since you’re much younger and in a different region, you may want to try Planet Earth Singles. Do keep in mind that some on that site are not really interested in homesteading but are guys on the edge, looking for a home and meal ticket. Yep, someday I’d hope to meet a fellow academic interested in staying healthy and throwing away what passes for society but I’m not holding my breath and nor should you. I keep getting stuff repaired task by task, generally while singing the classics then take a well earned rest by reading good literature by kerosene lamp in front of a warm fire. Don’t give up your dream.




Thanks for your thoughtful response and thank you for the compliment. I also believe societal changes are part of the issue. We have become more polarized in everything. There is no in between.  I have encountered very different types of people within the off grid/homesteading community and am part of a few homesteader groups on facebook but have to be cautious of those as well. I find two types of homesteaders....very conservative and very liberal. Not all are like that but its hard to find someone who aligns with my views.  I don't assign myself to either side because one is just as bad as the other. My views are pretty much all over the place. I grew up on a farm and lived in a very traditional household but decided to take a different path. I left the country and lived abroad for a few years and gained a lot of perspective which shaped me into who I am today as well as what I think my purpose is in life.

I work in higher ed and see a lot of generational differences. Its a little disheartening.  It is hard to find a person who shares some of my interests and views as well as hold a thoughtful conversation. I feel like I'm stuck between the two worlds...mainstream and my world. lol I'm creating my own sanctuary and will be inviting others to have either an experience or learn about making a lifestyle change and would like to teach how to build your own cob house as well as other off grid living skills.  I'm at a point right now where I would love to have great conversations with anyone but its far and few in between. I'm not necessarily focused on jumping into a relationship right now because I feel settled on my journey and done looking. I guess I'm more picky now because I have created boundaries so I won't get taken advantage of.  Being focused on my place and going to work everyday leaves little time for mate hunting. lol  But if it happens it happens.

I've tried online dating sites like Meet Mindful and other sites but have completely given up on those. All I seem to meet are child molesters, cheaters, druggies and mooches. Maybe my radar is broken. lol So yea, I don't have any faith in those websites. If you ever feel like chatting, you can send me a purple moosage.
 
Miskwa Yellowknife
Posts: 3
Location: Toivola, Michigan
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I’ll send you that moo sage when I figure out how to do it. Yep, in higher education, I felt like I was living in two very different worlds; theirs and mine. Right now I teach Environmental Science online and get queries from students who want to know more about homesteading. Finally feel like I’m doing my job as an Elder🙋🏾. Sadly, most online dating works for folk who are very average; there were studies by OKCupid and others that came to this conclusion. No degree higher than Bachelors, live urban or suburban, if you’re rural, better be Uber conservative and Christian. You need to be White, not too tall or short, have the requisite 2 kids, maybe a dog. Live average, watch TV, not too much culture, zero out of the ordinary. If you’re female, YOU will have to be the one to relocate. Dunno about you, but I fail on all counts.  I too, got mostly ski dudes in bad shape, and folks willing to meet in my town only because they had no options back home, and assorted weirdos. Was cyber stalked once. As of last week, PlanetEarth Singles currently has literally no one 50-80 in my state. Match had two druggie looking dudes in their 20’s.
 
Posts: 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

I'm an INFP and #9 on the Enneagram if that means anything to anyone.



I guess there is a pretty decent amount of #9 in the permaculturec scene, because they are longing for a different style of life than  #3 capitalism  (me too).
PS: Two eyes to fall in love with. So sad, Kansas is not in Europe ... I whish you to find a fitting partner.
 
Diane Maldonado
Posts: 45
Location: Corinth, KY
forest garden fungi homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Fred Fisher wrote:

I'm an INFP and #9 on the Enneagram if that means anything to anyone.



I guess there is a pretty decent amount of #9 in the permaculturec scene, because they are longing for a different style of life than  #3 capitalism  (me too).
PS: Two eyes to fall in love with. So sad, Kansas is not in Europe ... I whish you to find a fitting partner.



Kansas?! I don't know about Kansas but if Kentucky was in Europe that would be fine with me. The idea of living abroad is tempting. I've lived in South America for a few years and loved it. It really changed my perspective which led me to this lifestyle. I am planning a vacation next year to the UK. Very excited to see where my ancestors came from.
 
Fred Fisher
Posts: 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Diane Maldonado wrote:

Kansas?! I don't know about Kansas but if Kentucky was in Europe that would be fine with me. The idea of living abroad is tempting. I've lived in South America for a few years and loved it. It really changed my perspective which led me to this lifestyle. I am planning a vacation next year to the UK. Very excited to see where my ancestors came from.



Sorry I messed up US-State names a bit.  This sounds like an very interesting Trip for you.  I wish you to get to know your roots. Some years ago my parents had some visits from australia from far relatives whose parents migrated to australia. They were all very interested to learn about the country their ancesters came from.  I never lived  abroad so far, but made some visits to other countrys. And it ist true, as soon as you leave the tourist-tracks you are likly to learn something new.
 
We find this kind of rampant individuality very disturbing. But not this tiny ad:
A rocket mass heater is the most sustainable way to heat a conventional home
http://woodheat.net
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!