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!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Hope in a World of Crisis - Water Cycle Restoration

 
pollinator
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I have been blessed with incredible mentors throughout my life, leading me to experience firsthand the magic that happens when humans partner with nature. A world more beautiful than we can even imagine is possible. Yet, if you tune into the news today you are left with snapshots of a world in despair. You see the many environmental and humanitarian catastrophes and conflicts around the world, but what a lot of people don't see is that these are a result of our relationship with water. The severe anthropogenic disturbance of the earth’s hydrological cycle is leading to increasingly extreme climate, and cycles of flood, drought, and fire. However, the ability to rebalance the water cycle and mitigate extreme climate is at our fingertips, but we all need to look first to nature for answers to find the true solutions.

How do we distill this understanding down to the most essential parts, so that it can be easily communicated to others? That was my goal when I set out to do this TEDx talk.

If you are distraught about the state of the world today and looking for tangible actions you can take, this talk is intended for you. If you want to help restore global water cycles and create a world of abundance and health, please share this video as widely as you can. Humans need to know what is possible to move into action. Building awareness about the immense possibilities and potential is the first step.

 
garden master
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Thank you Zach!  We watched your TED talk at the recent PDC at Wheaton Labs after covering this material....really nicely done.  I'll be sure to share it with several of my friends and ask them to pass it on.  I think there's a lot of acceptance of the way things are, without understanding and really internalizing how they were, how they got this way and how they can recover.  Projects for this recovery are so deeply compelling.  
 
pollinator
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Very hopeful thank you
 
Posts: 2
Location: Malolos, Philippines
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Thank you Zack for the wealth of information. I was born and raised in the northern part of the Philippines where Virginia tobacco is grown. Years of cutting trees from our mountains to cure tobacco had caused deforestation and now we are experiencing a damage hydrological cycle. Household hamd pump wells  are getting dry, boreholes in the fields that farmers use to irrigate their crops are getting dry. Most unfortunate is that the river that used to supplement the villagers diet all year round is now temporary and had become shallower due to siltation or soil erosion. The use of dangerous agrochemicals on crops is also a concern. And yet, the people here seem not to understand the connection or the gravity of the problem. The government officals doesn't seem to mind either and so are the tobacco manufacturing industry is deafeningly silent on the environmental impact of tobacco growing and use.

I tried helping set up school gardens, conduct workshops and created a food forest at my parents backyard but it seems to me i am not making any dent. It's kinda frustrating  Any suggestions?

Jo
IMG_8255.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_8255.jpg]
The picutre that says it all....deforestation, dry wells, water scarcity, gender inequality and poverty
 
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Thank you, Zack. Just yesterday I was considering how to start meaningful discussions around water. I live on the California coast where I am hearing more discussions around wide scale use of desalination to solve our domestic water problems. What people don’t realize is that desalination is to water what fracking is to fossil fuels — just a way to “consume” more of a precious, vital,  and limited resource because we are too lazy and profit-oriented to address the systemic problem:  a fundamental disconnect in our relationship with water. Without water, life does not exist, and yet we undervalue it, pollute it, and manipulate it without recognizing its power. Before we can restore the hydrologic balance the earth needs, as you point out, we have to get people to realize this simple fact. Thank you again and I will start by sharing your TedTalk far and wide.
 
gardener
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Australia has a Geoff, we have a Zach. Our American Hero. Nice job Zach! You simplify it so easily.
 
pollinator
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Jo Peralta wrote:Thank you Zack for the wealth of information. I was born and raised in the northern part of the Philippines where Virginia tobacco is grown. Years of cutting trees from our mountains to cure tobacco had caused deforestation and now we are experiencing a damage hydrological cycle. ...

I tried helping set up school gardens, conduct workshops and created a food forest at my parents backyard but it seems to me i am not making any dent. It's kinda frustrating  Any suggestions?

Jo



Keep observing and understanding what you DO have control over, and make those things work better, so your neighbors will come to YOU with questions. You have a backyard. turn it into a noticeable oasis. Keep conducting workshops, keep setting up school gardens. These things take time, so don't spread yourself too thin. Get one project up and running. Keep a journal to record all those inspired future projects. Train your successors to manage while you begin a new project.

Understand:

Sepp Holtzer
https://www.unquotebooks.com/download/sepp-holzer-s-permaculture/Sepp Holtzer  (Watch out for the join free membership ad.)

Brad Landcaster' 2-volume handbook on Rain-water harvesting (Volume 2 is especially relevant for desert settings).

https://www.harvestingrainwater.com/


https://youtu.be/2iQ-FBAmvBw

Apparently you can get cash money from doing water conservation!


 
Posts: 18
Location: West-central Pennsylvania
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Kudos!! I've been saying this for years, maybe decades.
Oceans rising but the ice caps aren't decreasing proportionately. Water tables all over the earth are dropping drastically. It shouldn't take great knowledge to figure out where the extra water in the oceans is coming from. For some reason, most of the global warming pushers can only see what to them seems obvious. From residential use to agricultural use to commercial and industrial use of water, our ground water is being used up and flushed down the drains and isn't being replentished.
Along with the drying of the soil making it hydrophobic, we're building so-called flood control projects through nearly every village, town and city that has any amount of water flowing through it. This speeds up the water course making it harder for stream beds to absorb any water because it's moving faster. That's still less water reaching our underground aquifers. Cities further downstream are getting hit with higher and faster water that floods them just as badly as it did before their current flood control projects, making it necessary for flood control project re-engineering which moves the water even faster toward those cities downstream, which of course, have to re-engineer their flood control projects to move even more water faster.
 
Jo Peralta
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Mark Kissinger wrote:

Jo Peralta wrote:Thank you Zack for the wealth of information. I was born and raised in the northern part of the Philippines where Virginia tobacco is grown. Years of cutting trees from our mountains to cure tobacco had caused deforestation and now we are experiencing a damage hydrological cycle. ...

I tried helping set up school gardens, conduct workshops and created a food forest at my parents backyard but it seems to me i am not making any dent. It's kinda frustrating  Any suggestions?

Jo



Keep observing and understanding what you DO have control over, and make those things work better, so your neighbors will come to YOU with questions. You have a backyard. turn it into a noticeable oasis. Keep conducting workshops, keep setting up school gardens. These things take time, so don't spread yourself too thin. Get one project up and running. Keep a journal to record all those inspired future projects. Train your successors to manage while you begin a new project.

Understand:

Sepp Holtzer
https://www.unquotebooks.com/download/sepp-holzer-s-permaculture/Sepp Holtzer  (Watch out for the join free membership ad.)

Thanks Mark. The first school garden I helped was my village school. Since there's no funding, we (PTA) including the 5th and 6th graders pretty much use whatever materials we found around and I tell you these are abundant such as   bamboo for edgings,  rice hulls for paths, rice  straws, moringa leaves and branches, ipll and kakawati(leguminous shrubs), cardboard boxes, kitchen waste, etc etc. We used my favorite Sheet mulching as a quick way to build a garden and to show that these biodegrables are important sources of improving degraded soil, as a way of recycling them into usable form instead of burning it adding to the greenhouse gases. I shouldered some of the cost then later on some alumnis pitched in. Remember, this is a poor community but top heavy bureaucratic school system. The garden went on to win the Provincial school garden contest and the Principal was given recognition and awards at a 5 star Hotel. Sounds like I am bitter eh? I am fine but a couple months after the contest, I went to visit and  was dismayed at the lack of efforts to maintain it.  There were issues of some parents working abroad not wanting their children to work in the garden for the reason that they are working hard abroad to make life better for them. Hint: working the soil for many here is for the poor and most people wants their children to become professionals so they can work abroad. Some parents helped some just don't care and that created resentment  then the issue that the teachers are benefiting from the produce. There are guidelines set up but it seems like its not being followed. To them the enthusiasm of creating one for learning and to supplement the diet of the number of malnourished children is just not there. I learned a lot of lessons from that project. I don't live in the area but visited every now and then my elderly father and siblings.

I created a low maintenance Food forest at my elderly parents degraded backyard in 2016. The challenge was how to maintain the fruit trees I planted for lack of water, long dry season  and lack of worker to maintain it. I set up swales around the perimeter that catches runoffs from the mountain nearby and planted bananas  and moringa trees along side the fruit trees and mulched heavily. I planted lots of perennials and vegetables that reseed by itself. Today, the bananas( from tissue cultured) supply the whole clan with ripe fruits every now and then and a source of planting materials for others as bananas were wiped out due to viral disease.  The trees are thriving and the bananas and moringa trees are excellent for chop and drop. Another problem here in the Philippines is the median age of small farmers is 58 and their children are either working abroad or working odd jobs in the city.The youth has no interest and I was hoping to at least spark their interest for food security and to create green spaces.

The government officials here has no idea about conservation strategies. Education education education is what is direly needed here and to be able to do this it requires collaboration of all the stakeholders involved. But unless I am the President's daughter to be able to influence policies or I am rolling with money to create model farms for people to learn from, my hands are tied---for now. As an individual, yes, I do things I enjoy doing in this regard and have control over. I dream tho of setting up an Eco-House complete with water harvesting system, solar panels, living fence, nursery, chicken tractor, a permaculture demo farm similar to Sepp Holtzer as a gathering place. Lastly, I am comforted by a friend's message saying....not to stress at the challenges thrown my way, that there's time for everything and to just let it unfold according to God's plan. Thanks for unloading the frustrations lol.

Brad Landcaster' 2-volume handbook on Rain-water harvesting (Volume 2 is especially relevant for desert settings).

https://www.harvestingrainwater.com/


https://youtu.be/2iQ-FBAmvBw

Apparently you can get cash money from doing water conservation!


 
Posts: 8
Location: Manotick (Ottawa), Ontario
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Blaine Clark wrote: Water tables all over the earth are dropping drastically.



I think you mean the water table in various spots on earth where the population and/or industrial activities have increased their water use beyond the rate of replenishment. In some places, such as Phoenix, Arizona, and Miami, Florida, the overuse has even resulted in land subsidence and sinkholes. But in general the water table is fairly stable, with changes up and down determined mainly by precipitation and changes to infiltration (which is where human activity, such as paving large areas or deforestation, comes in). See https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/groundwater-storage-and-water-cycle for more scientific information.
The climate catastrophism ("world of crisis") that seems to be on the rise interferes with clear thinking, mental health, and our ability to effectively help the less fortunate members of our species to better health and ability to flourish. Our favoured way (permaculture) of food production may be too labour intensive to scale up enough to feed the world, but we can still develop useful skills in small scale application and share what we learn.
Keep growing, permies!
 
Rufaro Makamure
pollinator
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David Wieland wrote:

Blaine Clark wrote: Water tables all over the earth are dropping drastically.



Our favoured way (permaculture) of food production may be too labour intensive to scale up enough to feed the world, but we can still develop useful skills in small scale application and share what we learn.
Keep growing, permies!



This prepares us more in troubling times especially economically, than we can imagine. I have been privileged to experience this. An example is when we had no power and we had to turn to a well for water, years back when we used it, the most we would get was 2 drums after two days, this time we have been using it and we get to approximately 3 drums and there are no signs of it running out. It is in a field that we started using zai pits, a decision we made years back could be the one saving us now. Growing our own food with the aim of minimizing external input is another advantage, I could go on and on.
 
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Jo Peralta wrote:Thank you Zack for the wealth of information. I was born and raised in the northern part of the Philippines where Virginia tobacco is grown. Years of cutting trees from our mountains to cure tobacco had caused deforestation and now we are experiencing a damage hydrological cycle. Household hamd pump wells  are getting dry, boreholes in the fields that farmers use to irrigate their crops are getting dry. Most unfortunate is that the river that used to supplement the villagers diet all year round is now temporary and had become shallower due to siltation or soil erosion. The use of dangerous agrochemicals on crops is also a concern. And yet, the people here seem not to understand the connection or the gravity of the problem. The government officals doesn't seem to mind either and so are the tobacco manufacturing industry is deafeningly silent on the environmental impact of tobacco growing and use.

I tried helping set up school gardens, conduct workshops and created a food forest at my parents backyard but it seems to me i am not making any dent. It's kinda frustrating  Any suggestions?

Jo



Read up on Wangari Maathai. I suspect you'll find some useful parallels, methods and inspiration.
 
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