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Eastern White Pine wind break

 
Posts: 31
Location: King William, VA
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Hi there.  I am planning on planting a row or two of Eastern White Pine bare root seedlings along the edge of my field this fall as a wind break, and privacy hedge to obstruct the view of this house.  Does anybody have an opinion as to if I need to provide deer protection for these seedlings?

I was browsing the internet and found this product:  https://www.treepro.com/

Does anybody have experience with the Treepro tubes or anything similar to this?  I am going to be starting to plant a lot of trees on my property in the upcoming years and  would like to ensure the best success rate possible.  Any other tips for ensuring a high success rate when planting seedlings?  
windbreak-field.jpg
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master pollinator
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I have had some issues with moose chewing upon some Black Spruce I planted, but White Pine seem to be immune.

I am not sure I would plant White Pine as a windbreak though, only because if you plant it close enough to be effective, it will self-prune over time and get tall and spindly. If you plant it out more, it will grow up to be pasture pine, but then that will take awhile to happen. But I have never planted windbreaks before, so what do I know? I am just going by the traits of the tree a I have observed them.

 
Joshua LeDuc
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Travis Johnson wrote:I have had some issues with moose chewing upon some Black Spruce I planted, but White Pine seem to be immune.

I am not sure I would plant White Pine as a windbreak though, only because if you plant it close enough to be effective, it will self-prune over time and get tall and spindly. If you plant it out more, it will grow up to be pasture pine, but then that will take awhile to happen. But I have never planted windbreaks before, so what do I know? I am just going by the traits of the tree a I have observed them.



Well, luckily I don't have to worry about moose in Virginia!  Yeah, my neighbor planted a windbreak with white pine that is looking really healthy.  That's where I got my idea for planting.  
 
Travis Johnson
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Joshua LeDuc wrote:

Travis Johnson wrote:I have had some issues with moose chewing upon some Black Spruce I planted, but White Pine seem to be immune.

I am not sure I would plant White Pine as a windbreak though, only because if you plant it close enough to be effective, it will self-prune over time and get tall and spindly. If you plant it out more, it will grow up to be pasture pine, but then that will take awhile to happen. But I have never planted windbreaks before, so what do I know? I am just going by the traits of the tree a I have observed them.



Well, luckily I don't have to worry about moose in Virginia!  Yeah, my neighbor planted a windbreak with white pine that is looking really healthy.  That's where I got my idea for planting.  




Well I would go by what you see thriving in your area, and not pay much heed to what I say then! I really mean that. Maybe the cold stunts pasture pine or something here? My Grandfather planted some White Pine in the 1950's, but it never did well. It got White Pine Blister Rust and some 80 years later, there still are no logs to cut and sell. We never had good luck planting trees here for some reason: Black Spruce, White Pine, High Bred Hackmatack, etc.
 
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Hi Joshua,

I live a few counties west of you in Virginia. The pine bark beetle is wreaking havoc with pines right now. Maybe Eastern Red Cedar would be a better option.
 
pollinator
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I planted white pine into a field when they were about 12" tall.  They are all well over six feet and the deer haven't bothered them.  They love my willows though.
 
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If you're worried about disease or something, you could always do a staggered row of a few different conifers.  Then if some don't work out, the rest can carry the load.  Near me I see where they did windbreaks of pines and hybrid poplars.  The poplars shoot up and give wind protection for the first 10-20 years, then the pines take over for the rest of the century.
 
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I use white pine here for my windbreaks and they are fantastic.  I planted a lot of them a few years ago, they are 12 feet tall or so and very thick.  I love them.

I have poplar as well, but I only really need wind breaks here to stop the very cold winds coming in the winter.  That's the reason white pines are ideal for me.
 
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I wouldn't worry too much about deer munching on white pine.  Maybe mix in some eastern hemlock for variety (assuming it grows in your zone).
I'd also recommend white cedar, but deer will browse on that when times get tough.

As far as tips for planting seedlings, I'd prepare the holes ahead of time and be sure to mulch them well.
Also best to plant in the fall so they have more time to get established before the summer heat sets in.
 
Joshua LeDuc
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Barbara Martin wrote:Hi Joshua,

I live a few counties west of you in Virginia. The pine bark beetle is wreaking havoc with pines right now. Maybe Eastern Red Cedar would be a better option.



Barbara,

Yikes, really?!  Yeah, I was trying to avoid cedar because of the CAR, but maybe that would be a better option.  Thanks for the heads up!
 
Joshua LeDuc
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Scott Foster wrote:I planted white pine into a field when they were about 12" tall.  They are all well over six feet and the deer haven't bothered them.  They love my willows though.



That's good news.  How many years did it take to get them to 6 feet?
 
Joshua LeDuc
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Mike Jay wrote:If you're worried about disease or something, you could always do a staggered row of a few different conifers.  Then if some don't work out, the rest can carry the load.  Near me I see where they did windbreaks of pines and hybrid poplars.  The poplars shoot up and give wind protection for the first 10-20 years, then the pines take over for the rest of the century.



That's something to chew on for sure!  I was born and raised in Fall Creek, WI, so I bet it's starting to feel like late summer where you are!
 
Joshua LeDuc
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Pete Podurgiel wrote:I wouldn't worry too much about deer munching on white pine.  Maybe mix in some eastern hemlock for variety (assuming it grows in your zone).
I'd also recommend white cedar, but deer will browse on that when times get tough.

As far as tips for planting seedlings, I'd prepare the holes ahead of time and be sure to mulch them well.
Also best to plant in the fall so they have more time to get established before the summer heat sets in.



That's good advice Pete.  Yes, I plan on planting this fall.
 
Joshua LeDuc
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Trace Oswald wrote:I use white pine here for my windbreaks and they are fantastic.  I planted a lot of them a few years ago, they are 12 feet tall or so and very thick.  I love them.

I have poplar as well, but I only really need wind breaks here to stop the very cold winds coming in the winter.  That's the reason white pines are ideal for me.



Wow, those are quick growers!  
 
Scott Foster
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Joshua LeDuc wrote:

Scott Foster wrote:I planted white pine into a field when they were about 12" tall.  They are all well over six feet and the deer haven't bothered them.  They love my willows though.



That's good news.  How many years did it take to get them to 6 feet?



Joshua, they are in the fourth year.  White pines grow fast if they like where they are planted.  I put them in a field, watered them the first year and chipped around the drip line.    Also, I kept them weeded as they grew.

I took a couple of pictures off of the deck.
IMG_0060.JPG
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The far side of the fence-Birds like to land on the leader and break them off.
IMG_0061.JPG
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Another one just beyond the fence line.
 
Joshua LeDuc
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Scott Foster wrote:

Joshua LeDuc wrote:

Scott Foster wrote:I planted white pine into a field when they were about 12" tall.  They are all well over six feet and the deer haven't bothered them.  They love my willows though.



That's good news.  How many years did it take to get them to 6 feet?



Joshua, they are in the fourth year.  White pines grow fast if they like where they are planted.  I put them in a field, watered them the first year and chipped around the drip line.    Also, I kept them weeded as they grew.

I took a couple of pictures off of the deck.



Those darn birds!  lol....  Looks nice Scott!
 
pollinator
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Your extension office or Conservation District probably does a spring giveaway of local tree seedlings.  When I went 5 or so years ago, I could have taken as much white pine as I wanted at the end of the giveaway.  The deer did nibble on the buds the first two years, but it didn't stop the trees from growing taller.  They're now at least 8 feet tall.  Frankly, I don't notice their height anymore because they do a great job of screening my house from the neighbor and his security light.
 
Joshua LeDuc
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Ruth Meyers wrote:Your extension office or Conservation District probably does a spring giveaway of local tree seedlings.  When I went 5 or so years ago, I could have taken as much white pine as I wanted at the end of the giveaway.  The deer did nibble on the buds the first two years, but it didn't stop the trees from growing taller.  They're now at least 8 feet tall.  Frankly, I don't notice their height anymore because they do a great job of screening my house from the neighbor and his security light.



Thanks for the advice Ruth.  I'll keep on the lookout!
 
Ruth Meyers
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I went looking, and it appears that Conservation Districts are no longer giving away seedlings.  They sponsor sales though.

Your local doesn't list that as a service or activity: http://www.trswcd.org/index.htm
(though they are encouraging cover crop mulching, I see.)

I went down the hall to ask what West Virginia does now.  I was given an order form for Clements State Tree Nursery.

http://www.wvcommerce.org/ClementsNursery

Out of state ordered are allowed.

 
Joshua LeDuc
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Yes, in Virginia they do have cheap seedlings that are sold in the fall and spring.

http://dof.virginia.gov/nursery/index.htm
 
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