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the quest for super soil

 
gardener
Posts: 6785
Location: Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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ian labo wrote:Hello Dr Redhawk. Do you  think your super soil can equal the amount of harvest in a chemically fertilize farm. And how about  the amount of work invested. I have concerns over the prohibitive price  of chemical fertelizer in the near future due to many things but primarily due to the cost of petrol.

Thanks

Ian


When your soil is in a state of good quantities of bioactivity the yield will be equal to or surpass the "modern fertilized farm". There will also be higher nutritional values in the bioactive farm product.  Chemicals tend to remain in the soil or wash away to contaminate the hydrological area. That's why many ground water and channels and streams/rivers are contaminated by field run off. The artificial nutrients, by lack of proper soil biology, simply can't be used by the plants.

Redhawk
 
Bryant RedHawk
gardener
Posts: 6785
Location: Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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Skip Smith wrote:Hi Redhawk.
My garden is recently cleared oak forest with stumps intact.  There is sc orange  clay soil that drains well. Last year the potatos grew to half an inch instead of full sized.  It has earthworms and snails ladybugs stink bugs and big black ants.  It's all on a 1:6 n facing slope.  
I need to grow food fast.  I broke up the mat of roots and decayed leaves on the surface and mixed it with the orange clay soil beneath and added lime and some wood ash.  It needs more nitrogen.  I bought some ca nitrate.  Can I put a very small amount in to get things jumpstarted without hurting the worms and good bacteria too much?  Nothing wants to grow but I have grown about 5 huge daikon after scattering hundred of seeds.  My radishes and  turnips only grew to one inch but my dads are three in high.  Similar weather.  Temperature max 65 F and min 35.  
Also I want to make use of all the leaves and urine but don't want to smell it at all.  How can I make a completely inoffensive smellin leaf compost pile that has lots of microbes?  I got molasses hoRse salt lick and can  chop the leaves with a weedwaker. Thanks

 

At this point I would spread that leaf heap over the soil as Hans suggested. Then I would start building wood chips on top of that to a thickness of 3 to 6 inches. Then I would make mushroom sluries and pour those over the wood chips. When you are ready to plant again, just plant inches wood chips, the roots will go down into the soil through the chips and composting leaf mulch.

Redhawk
 
pioneer
Posts: 479
Location: On the plateau in crab orchard, TN
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Have boards 3 foot wide for my 3 beds per 3 rows.   Growing watermelon, spreaded out all over, tried planting sweet potatoes in part of a lawn.  they like to spread too.  got some super size beets too.  have mints in buckets in front yard.
 
The only thing that kept the leeches off of me was this tiny ad:
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