Win a copy of Grocery Story this week in the City Repair forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • r ranson
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Anne Miller
stewards:
  • Mike Jay
  • paul wheaton
  • Joseph Lofthouse
garden masters:
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Steve Thorn
  • James Freyr
  • Greg Martin
  • Dave Burton
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Dan Boone

!!!!! Why fungi are a great addition to your homestead

 
gardener
Posts: 1716
Location: Olympia, WA - Zone 8a/b
668
hugelkultur kids forest garden fungi trees books bike homestead
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator



Are you supporting fungi on your homestead? Fungi are incredibly useful helpers on any wild homestead. This week’s blog post—Fungi on the Homestead - 3 Benefits of Fungi—summarizes all the amazing benefits of fungi into 3 core categories.

These categories are:
1. Building Soil
2. Helping Your Plants Grow
3. Providing an Edible Harvest

You could write a book for each of these 3 categories but the blog post covers both enough to help you start to understand why fungi are so beneficial to your homestead.

When I see the fruiting bodies of fungi (mushrooms) popping up in an area I have just started transforming I know I’m doing something right.

What I Find to be the Most Amazing Part of Fungi



Fungi are just simply amazing with their ability to help build soil and unlock nutrients for your plants and provide great harvests for you and your homestead. But what I really find amazing with fungi is their ability to create an interconnected web with most of the plants in an ecosystem.

This interconnected web is often referred to as the wood wide web.

Nature is all about creating connections between diverse members of an ecosystem, but this fungi/plant network is just amazing.

The wood wide web is not just about the fungi sharing nutrients and water with plants in exchange for sugars. It goes far beyond this simple exchange network.

Through the wood wide web plants can share nutrients with each other and not just with fungi. In addition, the plants can even send warnings about pests to each other.

But one of the most amazing aspects of the wood wide web is that it has been shown that when a tree is dying it will sometimes dump its nutrients in a final sacrifice to help support the next generation of seedlings growing around it that are all connected through the wood wide web.

For me the biggest lesson to take after you learn about the wood wide web is that fungi are key to a healthy, resilient and abundant wild homestead. Because of this I whenever I’m getting ready to plant in a new area I always make sure to support a rich fungal community.

This means lots of wood chips and other organic material. I’m always chop-and-dropping and adding mulch to my planting areas.

I want to create the habitat that will support the most fungi. This also means that I love building hugelkultur beds and I’m often adding snags and other woody debris to the surface of my planting areas.

The result has been a ton of fungi growing on my wild homestead.

What Do You Do to Support Fungi on Your Homestead?



There is a lot you can do to support fungi on your homestead. What do you do?

I like to add mulch, woody debris and of course a diverse plant community to support the widest range of fungi possible.

I would love to hear what you do. Please leave a comment saying how you support fungi on your homestead. And before you head out make sure to check out the blog post for more information about the 3 core types of benefits provided by fungi.

While you are over on the blog most make sure to leave a comment! If you are the first to do so you will get a piece of pie! The pie will get you access to some special features on perimes, discounts at some vendors, and you can use it to purchase some products on the permies digital marketplace.

If you leave a comment on the blog post make sure to leave a post here on permies too so I can easily give you the slice of pie.

Thank you!
 
pollinator
Posts: 2992
Location: Toronto, Ontario
352
hugelkultur dog forest garden fungi trees rabbit urban wofati cooking bee homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I compost my kitchen scraps and rabbit’s litter, whose bedding is composed of raw wadded paper byproduct, which the worms love. As we eat a lot of fungi, we have a few different species competing in around the compost and in the garden. Dominant, I think, is the King Oyster, but recently I have seen some enoki poking up from under the bin.

I posted the above on your blog. I thought it relevant.

-CK
Staff note (Daron Williams):

Thank you for commenting on the blog post! You were the first so pie for you!

 
Daron Williams
gardener
Posts: 1716
Location: Olympia, WA - Zone 8a/b
668
hugelkultur kids forest garden fungi trees books bike homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Chris Kott wrote:I compost my kitchen scraps and rabbit’s litter, whose bedding is composed of raw wadded paper byproduct, which the worms love. As we eat a lot of fungi, we have a few different species competing in around the compost and in the garden. Dominant, I think, is the King Oyster, but recently I have seen some enoki poking up from under the bin.

I posted the above on your blog. I thought it relevant.

-CK



Nice! Thanks for sharing! Did you inoculate your garden/compost to get the edible mushrooms started?
 
pioneer
Posts: 215
Location: The Arkansas Ozarks
24
cat dog forest garden rabbit building solar rocket stoves woodworking wood heat homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Daron,

I have several modes of encouraging fungi.  I have many loads of wood chips decomposing in piles and on top of the garden as mulch.  Some areas on the garden had visible white stands of fungus growing in the mulch.  I have three bins of worms and inoculated the bins with some mychorizal fungi from an old rotten log.  The hope is that they will become super charged worm castings.

I am also waiting to find some native edible fungi with which I can inoculate some of the wood chips. My neighbors have found some morels and lions mane, but they didn't know at the time that I wanted a few for inoculation.  I am searching for more.

Sincerely,

Ralph
 
Chris Kott
pollinator
Posts: 2992
Location: Toronto, Ontario
352
hugelkultur dog forest garden fungi trees rabbit urban wofati cooking bee homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I started with a King Oyster slurry from the trimmings of a mushroom risotto, and a couple of  half-off bags from the grocery store, and they took off. The enoki was accidental, in the compost from trimmings, but welcome.

-CK
 
Posts: 88
Location: SW New Mexico, 5300'elevation, 18" precip
13
goat hugelkultur forest garden chicken greening the desert homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We have been hauling detritus from our streambed to the garden. It's a bit of an uphill haul on foot with a back pack but definitely worth it! Our little stream floods occasionally, depositing lots of branches, twigs, leaves, pine cones, seeds, bugs, you name it from higher elevations into piles along the bank. After a couple of months/years it starts to break down somewhat and when we dig into the piles there are hundreds of earthworms and fungal webs and probably nutrients that are missing from our soil.

We've been using the more broken-down castings from the earthworm activity in these piles in seedling soil mixes and the more rough stuff for mulch on shrubs and trees. We also add a good layer of the fungal- rich detritus to the bottom of fruit tree holes to encourage a fungal dominated soil. The new trees seem to be loving it! Lots of mushrooms too.

If we had a burro, we'd be mulching the entire garden with this treasure of a resource!
 
pollinator
Posts: 997
Location: Longbranch, WA
127
goat tiny house rabbit wofati chicken solar
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Rebuilding the homestead after the housed burned Iknew I would have to move the boysenberries to permit regrading for the new house. The power company was riming the spur line that crosses or property and I had them dump the chipe on the up hill end of where I planed to move the berry crowns. They had a few months for the mycilium to grow in the pile. I dug the sod out in 2 diches put the crowns in at 3 foot spacing and filled around them with the chips then put the sod upside down on top.
despite being transplanted they bloomed and produced more fruit than in there original position.
 
I am mighty! And this is a mighty small ad:
Solar Dehydrator Plans - Combo Package download
https://permies.com/t/solar-dehydrator
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!