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Cut flowers for indoors

 
Posts: 106
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It may not be edible, but I LOVE having flowers to bring indoors for most of the gardening season here.    Sharing a few of the bouquets I've enjoyed from my own yard this past year,   I am not shy about including "weeds" as well,   I let fleabane grow everywhere for example.    And anything with interesting foliage as well, like y willow.    I make a fresh arrangement for my work lobby every week as well to share with clients:  

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pollinator
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Beautiful!  I just started growing flowers to sell along side our produce at farmers markets.  I didn't pay all that much attention to them until around 3 years ago.  Now I find myself really enjoying them.  

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Heather Staas
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beautiful!  How are they doing as a sale item,  is it popular?    (and now I must have iris....   lol)
 
T.J. Stewart
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Thank you, Heather.  :)  They don't do too bad.  Some of the markets that we do are better than others for them.  Are you thinking of starting a business selling what you love? :)
 
Heather Staas
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Ha, well, always more ideas than time right?      I'm currently self-employed doing what I love (dog training) and it fills up many of my hours quite well.    Although I would be lying if I said I don't often think of adding a small "farm stand/self serve"  right inside my current lobby!    It could happen...     (if only I had multiple mes)
 
pollinator
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Any recommended things to grow for cut flowers? The flowers in the 'forest garden' gave me much joy last year, and I'd like to add to their ranks.
So far I have echinacea (pink and white), eucalyptus, alliums and rudbeckia.
 
T.J. Stewart
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Heather Staas wrote:Ha, well, always more ideas than time right?    .... (if only I had multiple mes)



LOL That's the truth!  .... (I know the feeling).  We do markets and have a farm stand that is semi self serve.  The farm stand is the easiest.  I really want to work my way out of farmers markets and into u-pick farm memberships, whole sell to local producers (fruit, herbs, and flowers), and just the farm stand.

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Heather Staas
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Charli,  one of the only things this house came with was 4 large rose bushes.     I never appreciated roses before!    The are excellent thorny habitat for small birds and mammals, create a lot of ground protection,  and the blooms start in June and then reblooms go right through to the mid fall for me.   I had no idea they were so versatile.    I'm working on figuring how to develop and use rose hips (I understand, I think, that not all types of roses are useful this way).    Almost all of my flower arrangements included roses.     I also use a lot of non-conventional fillers...  like catmint and marigolds.  They are WONDERFUL in bouquets and long-lasting cut.   Who knew?   And they are both already hard working permaculture plants in their own rights.   How about sochan/ cutleaf coneflowers?   LOTS of tall yellow daisy like flowers on long stems,  and lots of delicious greens in the spring.  
 
pollinator
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Charli Wilson wrote:Any recommended things to grow for cut flowers? The flowers in the 'forest garden' gave me much joy last year, and I'd like to add to their ranks.
So far I have echinacea (pink and white), eucalyptus, alliums and rudbeckia.







I like my hydrangeas, crocosmia (though they will take over if you don't watch them), goldenrod, campanula, buddleia, clematis and of course roses--I have a lot of others too, mostly perennials, though some years I'll raise things like sweet peas, dahlias and cosmos .  Most of mine are legacy plants from a previous owner, though I did put in loads of spring bulbs myself, as well as a few others.

For a couple of years I was taking a photo of my weekly homegrown bouquets, but life happens.  I still pick the weekly bouquet but it's for our cemetary visit now.
 
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