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Attaching Joists to a Beam

 
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I'm planning to build an upper floor/mezzanine in my workshop. It will have 2x10x13 joists supported at one end by a stud wall and at the other by LVL beams. The beams will be 5.25''x9.5'' x 13' long. My question is, can the beams be connected via joist hangers or do I need to rest the ends of the joists on the beam? The reason being, joist hangers would give me more head room. But would the joist hanger design tend to pull loose from the load? Please see the attachment. Thanks!
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Wayne,

On my house, my joists rest on top of my beam.  I think this is the most sturdy way to construct a joist/beam connection.  You can further strengthen the connection using hurricane clips to anchor the joist to the beam.  I don’t know if this is a necessary step, but it beats toenailing the joist and it is both cheap and incredibly simple.

I am not a carpenter, but this is what I did when I built my deck.

Eric
 
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Hi Wayne, I think the standard/code way would be to do it either way.  As I understand it, if you nail the joist hangers the way they're "supposed" to be nailed, it shouldn't pull away like your detail shows.  The angled nails that go into the ends of the joists should be long so that they go well into the beam.  So the common short nails for the flange of the joist hanger and longer ones for the toenail ones.

If you're really worried about it, you could nail on some galvanized metal strapping along the underside of the joists and continue it onto the under side of the beam.  One strap at each joist should give some more peace of mind.
 
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They look different to the hangers i have seen, all the ones iv used clip over the top of the beam +1 with the big nail! 😁
 
pollinator
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If the beam cannot twist, the joists cannot pull away at the bottom. At least, not without movement elsewhere in the assembly.

I would use heavy steel, quarter inch or so, where the beam connects to the post. Set it on top, then add an angle fitting underneath, and/or overlapping plate on the sides, secured with bolts,  structural screws, or in a pinch heavy lags.


It may not be necessary per code, I have no idea.. but it would definitely be stronger.

I suppose you could also substitute structural screws for the lower nails on the joist hangers. They certainly would not pull out and are pretty hard to snap.
 
Wayne Webb
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Thanks all, you have been most helpful. I will definitely be using some extra steel to connect the beams to the joists. This configuration will allow more room to move things under the beam/s. I will be storing materials like blocks of EPS foam up there, as well as keeping some of my stationary metal fabrication tools up there like a 50'' slip roll, 48'' box brake etc.
 
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Wayne


Google ["simpson strongtie" joist hanger specifications]

Change out the "specifications" for "installation" if the install guides don't show also.

Your application s/b easily accommodated. There is also a type of hanger which wraps over the top of a plate or beam and also one which wraps around the stud or column. At this time metal connectors are a very rich product field.

If you have not done this type of thing before, may I suggest you
1) study the bearing/footing requirements for the columns which hold the beam
2) study the requirements for the bearing stud wall; including how the joists may be positioned along that wall
3) get a full size (not the tiny ones which hit the market last year) "palm nailer" which you will need to install metal connector nails properly; you could also get a metal connector gun, but those can be pricey and finicky and you still need the palm nailer for tight corners
4) Read the code. The IRC is a very very valuable compendium. Most of it is sensible and understandable.


Regards,
Rufus
 
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If this was me, I might do it differently just because I hate buying crap when there are better/equal ways of doing the same thing with what I already have.

For me, in looking at the laminated triple beam the floor joists are being hooked too, I would lay up the middle portion of that laminated beam, so it would be (1) 2x8 or whatever dimension it is, but only one of them. Then I would through nail through that single 1-1/2 inch framing lumber, and into the floor joist going across. Through nailing is so much stronger than toe-nailing. I would also lay out my wall so that a stud was underneath every floor joist so that the weight would be transferred directly onto the foundation below. Then after all my floor joists were nailed to this single framing lumber member. I would put on the outside portion of the laminated beam. I would not be shy an spikes either. Then I would infill on the inside portion of the beam, cutting pieces to fill in between where the floor joists were,

That would give you a super-solid connection without having to buy steel joist hangers.
 
Rufus Laggren
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+1 --> Place joists over studs in the bearing wall.

> site built beam...
Done that. Works. Takes a little more time. Need to verify the span per load. Pay attention to the width which will need to be supported at the ends. Solidify an exact plan because the odd inch here/there can be a real headache. There are tables for building beams from sawn lumber.

+1 --> Blocking (tightly; full depth or close) between joists at the beam.Help keep joists straight over time.

What _is_ required by code:
International Building Code (IBC), in addition to having to install blocking where joists overlap over a center beam, blocking is also required every 8 feet for 2x10 and taller joists. ... As long as blocking meets this requirement, it does not necessarily have to be centered over the length of the floor joists.

And a more recent code: (IRC modified for CA, 2016)
R502.7.1 Bridging [ie. blocking]
Joists exceeding a nominal 2 inches by 12 inches (51 mm by 305 mm) shall be supported laterally by solid blocking, diagonal bridging (wood or metal), or a continuous 1 inch by 3 inch (25.4 mm by 76 mm) strip nailed across the bottom of joists perpendicular to joists at intervals not exceeding 8 feet (2438 mm).

Here is the IRC link. It's a good site with relatively easy access to many codes:
https://up.codes/viewer/california/ca-residential-code-2016/chapter/5/floors#5

The page linked above relates to all floors generally. The first half is about wood floors. Language is mostly understandable. Much more data than any particular issue needs, but but the span tables may be helpful. A quick skim gives an idea of what the "authors" felt important to floors and then it's a matter of running down the subsection titles to find your area of interest.

Have a plan for lifting heavy structure like the beam. You want to be able to adjust stuff easily and safely once the piece is (mostly) in place.


Regards,
Rufus
 
Travis Johnson
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To "lift" the beam, you can nail 2x4's at 45 degree angles on each end, and then slide the beam up the 2x4's, first moving one side, and then the other. Me and Katie did this with a 16 foot 8x8" beam in our timber framed home. She was 7 months pregnant at the time. There is no heavy lifting because you are just sliding the beam up an inclines plane. When you need to take a break, just use c-clamps to keep the beam from sliding back down.

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I love that technique Travis
 
Rufus Laggren
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Geometry at work!  Working alone, you get cunning and creative... <g>


Rufus
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