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Making Geta Japanese shoes

 
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A few days ago I was looking around for Geta. I found many but could not find one in my size. I have thought about making my own. Has anyone made there own geta? If so what plans or research did you read? Any unique tools or skills needed?

The following video is a quick overview of the process.

 
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Wow - that video brings back memories from years ago when I was in Nihon for 10 months. I've worn them but never made any. I would look at the tipping points in normal gaits to size up the location of the blocks. The guys filmed would have learned the skill by apprenticing for years - just choosing where the blocks will sit on the wood so that the grain is correct for the strength may be fairly critical.
 
T Blankinship
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Ok an apprenticeship would be the way to go.  I made my first geta last night but was in a rush due to a storm brewing. I need more practice but I think it is a good start.
DSC_0086.JPG
1st try at making geta
1st try at making geta
 
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Hey - you try and you learn from what you tried! I give apples for "trying"!

A picture of your foot on one of them would be helpful, but it appears to me that you need your attachment point for the back part of the strap to be further back on your geta. You don't want to feel as if your foot is always at risk of slipping off - particularly because the "SAFETY FIRST" hat I frequently don here on permies is worried you'll twist an ankle slipping off.

How did you attach the bits of wood together?
 
T Blankinship
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Yes the attachments do need some work. I am thinking that a bigger strap would help. I need to make another pair that fixes the following: Foot movement on shoe, better way to attach the strap, better comfort when on the foot and easier to take off and on. Here is a picture of me with the geta on.  
DSC_0088.JPG
[Thumbnail for DSC_0088.JPG]
 
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I know from previous geta purchases that the straps are usually REALLY tight, like the first time you wear them you wonder if you're going to need a crowbar to get your toes under them (then again, as a large-footed barbarian in Japan I usually felt that way whenever footwear or slippers was involved....). My geta were always very well secured on my feet. Maybe that's why the straps are usually made of something nice and soft (I had a few where the straps were padded velvet), so they can loosen up and still keep the shoes on safely.  
 
T Blankinship
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Tereza Okava wrote:I know from previous geta purchases that the straps are usually REALLY tight, like the first time you wear them you wonder if you're going to need a crowbar to get your toes under them (then again, as a large-footed barbarian in Japan I usually felt that way whenever footwear or slippers was involved....). My geta were always very well secured on my feet. Maybe that's why the straps are usually made of something nice and soft (I had a few where the straps were padded velvet), so they can loosen up and still keep the shoes on safely.  



That helps me out a lot. My thought starting this project was that geta were something like a flip flop. Having the geta tight on the foot would solve the issue I have been having with my foot moving on the geta. I just need to get more wood to make another pair.
 
Be reasonable. You can't destroy everything. Where would you sit? How would you read a tiny ad?
Perennial Vegetables: How to Use Them to Save Time and Energy
https://permies.com/t/96921/Planting-Perennial-Vegetables-Homestead
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