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Determining annual average temperature

 
pollinator
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Location: Victoria BC
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Looking at various building options, and it would sure be handy to have a good idea of annual average temperature at my site, and at other places I have lived.

I'm sure this data is around, but so far haven't found it... anyone have a good resource? I am in Canada, if that is significant.
 
gardener
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Yup- Environment Canada's Climate Normals and historical weather archives. The normals are a 30 year average of a bunch of parameters, average monthly min, max, and average daily temps, precipitation, max precipitation, max and min temps, etc, including if I recall, heating and cooling days. The historical weather data is daily weather data dating back as far as the late 1800s for current and historic weather stations around Canada, downloadable as either an .xls or a .csv, cant recall which.


https://climate.weather.gc.ca/climate_normals/


https://climate.weather.gc.ca/historical_data/search_historic_data_e.html
 
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Catie George wrote:The normals are a 30 year average of a bunch of parameters,



In other words, climate change will bring new meaning to the term, "new normal."
 
pollinator
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Jason Hernandez wrote:In other words, climate change will bring new meaning to the term, "new normal."


To my mind, it would be helpful to the OP if you could suggest a reasonable correction factor to apply to the existing data. Thoughts?
 
Catie George
gardener
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Douglas Alpenstock wrote:

Jason Hernandez wrote:In other words, climate change will bring new meaning to the term, "new normal."


To my mind, it would be helpful to the OP if you could suggest a reasonable correction factor to apply to the existing data. Thoughts?



If I recall, I usually use 1.5-2C as the correction factor. One might be able to get a correction factor by comparing 2 sets of normals data, and subtracting the difference though it wouldnt be particularly statistically significant or sound.  I am too  lazy this morning to check but if it showed a 1 C difference and the difference was 10 years, you could fudge the data by 1C/10 years
 
gardener
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Current data is reveling that global warming is accelerating but not in a manner that can be expressed through math standardised computations. The issue seems to be linked to the rapid changes in jetstream trajectories, which  are shifting both faster and in more erratic ways, making predicting weather events harder even with the improvments in algorithms used. These problems make calculating conversion factors less accurate than it used to be.

Today, we need to keep our own records since annomolies are more abundant and distance can cause differences in as little as 1/2 mile.
Redhawk
 
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