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Cooking stove for 200Sqft Tiny home

 
master gardener
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Hello folks

I am going to be building a tiny home on a round wood sled. It will be skiddable. I am wanting to only cook with wood. We currently do this with a fisher stove in the main house. And we now have a rocket oven!!! We are almost propane free!



so following the same principle in this tiny house. I would like to be able to cook with only firewood. I would also like to gain some experience making a rocket cookstove/DSR/vortex stove/ matt walker cook stove.


My main concerns are.
The floor will be Nominal 2x8s 16"OC and the flooring might be 2x4s. Will this be strong enough for one of these stoves?

it is a small space and i am wondering if this it too much of a stove for 200Sqft. How will i know?

Cooking is the main function of the stove for me.

Need more information?

Thanks for any help!

I can always create a small j-tube outside to cook on, however i would like to have the option of cooking inside for when the weather is rainy/windy.
 
gardener
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I don't think your issue is weight-bearing so much as flexing. A masonry stove cannot tolerate any flexing of the floor under it, so you will have to either ensure the house is totally rigid, or make a rigid platform to set on the floor. If you primarily want cooking use with minimal heating, you can reduce the mass to as low as you can get while holding the works. You might even make a braced metal frame/base to set the insulated refractory core in. If you have a metal shell instead of brick, you may be able to significantly reduce the footprint of the Walker tiny cookstove. Also, depending on the usage, particularly if you don't plan on being able to cook with four pots at once, you can probably scale down the Walker design to a 4" or 5" equivalent core and make the overall stove narrower.
 
jordan barton
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thanks for the reply glenn.

So is the flexing concerns all of the time? Or are the flexing concerns when/if i need to move the tiny house on skids? I figured i would need to dismantle the stove if i needed to move the tiny house.

I can always change the flooring/floor joists to accommodate a heavier stove.

Matt walkers stove seems simple in my mind. It incorporates all of the elements i would want from a stove. I am mostly concerned with it being just to dam big of a stove for such a small space.

Maybe i would be worth it for me to contact him via email.......


Would you happen to know about other small masonry stoves designs i could take a look at? The Vortex stove seems like too big of a stove. Of course i could always come up with another means of cooking food when it was to warm inside the house. I just imagine cooking beans on the stove for 4 hours would be hot!

 
Rocket Scientist
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Hi Jorden;  Flexing would only happen when moving the house.
Take a look at this thread. Its rather long but a good example of making a small masonry stove.
https://permies.com/t/43809/Masonry-stove-diy-build-feasible
 
pollinator
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That's about the size of our house. We've got a super basic metal box wood stove, about 15x20".  I would hate to have that thing going long enough to even boil a bit of water in the summer.  Even in winter, it's sometimes hard to run it hot enough for long enough to cook anything substantial without heating the house up unreasonably. I realize you'll have the mass absorbing heat, but still, it might be tough to make it work all year.

Another thing about cooking in such a small space is it produces a lot of humidity. And all your clothes smell like whatever you cooked for three days afterwards.
 
pollinator
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Jan White wrote:That's about the size of our house. We've got a super basic metal box wood stove, about 15x20".  I would hate to have that thing going long enough to even boil a bit of water in the summer.  Even in winter, it's sometimes hard to run it hot enough for long enough to cook anything substantial without heating the house up unreasonably. I realize you'll have the mass absorbing heat, but still, it might be tough to make it work all year.

Another thing about cooking in such a small space is it produces a lot of humidity. And all your clothes smell like whatever you cooked for three days afterwards.



About the size of my tinyhouse too, and I really second the humidity issue. I currently cook with propane, and extended cooking times in summer is Not Good; planning to have Really Good ventilation, and ideally a way to cook outdoors most of the warmish seasons, is important.
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