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How to grow winter squash

 
steward & bricolagier
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I am giving away a bunch of winter squash seeds here Seeds want to go places!! and I have had several new users ask me how to grow them.
Can I get some permies to tell them?

:D
 
steward
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Plant seeds an inch deep.

Stomp them in really well.

Add one inch of water per week (rain or irrigation).

Weed, weed, weed, weed, weed, weed.

 
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As we're in the gardening for beginners...

In addition to Joseph's recommendation, do plant them after danger of frost has past. In the spring. They do not grow during the winter, as I once imagined.
 
pollinator
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It depends where you are. for me, plant them inside in mid May plant out 1st June and pray we get a warm enough summer for them to do anything.
 
pollinator
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Joseph Lofthouse wrote:
Stomp them in really well.



Interesting, I've heard this advice about carrots too. I didn't stomp in my kabocha seeds, and I only got 4 or 5 germinated out of... 50-80? So maybe this is key.

Next year I will stomp stomp stomp!
 
gardener
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Any seeds planted in dirt would benefit from the capillary action or wicking of water to help them sprout.

Pressing down the dirt that covers a seed helps the wicking process, as opposed to having airy soil on top.

The one thing I’d like to add is that squashes like a good, fertile ground, they would do poorly in poor soil. Add plenty of compost before planting, and/or feed during growth.
 
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I agree with all of the above, plus: Give them a lot of space! If you squeeze them in, they might grow but not produce well, or might ripen late. Give them rich soil -- not fully finished compost or manure is fine for squashes -- and a few feet of space in each direction. The best ones I've grown were at the edge of the garden, so they could sprawl onto the driveway (though they also had plenty of garden space around them, since the root systems also need space, not just the visible sprawl. I got over 50 lbs from two plants (25 kg).
 
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