Win a deck of Permaculture Playing Cards this week in the Permaculture forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • James Freyr
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Anne Miller
  • r ranson
  • Mike Jay Haasl
  • Dave Burton
  • Pearl Sutton
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Joseph Lofthouse
garden masters:
  • Steve Thorn
gardeners:
  • Dan Boone
  • Carla Burke
  • Kate Downham

How does an apartment dweller make the world a better place?

 
Posts: 79
1
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
what about some guerilla composting? In Sweden (unlike Germany), there is no way to compost "officially" your scraps and peels, so I have found some semi-wild dark corners in a central city park where I put my compost, where no-one goes, and the rabbits/hares in the park love it.
 
steward
Posts: 28902
Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
hugelkultur trees chicken wofati bee woodworking
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Learn about all of the permaculture things that you cannot do ... yet.
 
paul wheaton
steward
Posts: 28902
Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
hugelkultur trees chicken wofati bee woodworking
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Learn survival skills for living in the wilderness.   Just putting this bit of knowledge in your head can convert a dreary job from "have to do" to "part of a strategy".
 
Posts: 180
Location: Sunizona Az., USA @ 4,500' Zone 8a
8
greening the desert
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
If you have a usable balcony or  patio, a Tower Garden would be cool.  
Picture1222161058_1.jpg
[Thumbnail for Picture1222161058_1.jpg]
 
steward
Posts: 2149
Location: Sunshine Coast, BC
618
hugelkultur forest garden fungi trees books chicken bee
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Have 'New to You' parties. Everyone brings things they no longer want/need - clothes, toys, tools, etc. - and exchange. The left overs get taken to the thrift store/recycling. Add some food and you've got a party!
 
paul wheaton
steward
Posts: 28902
Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
hugelkultur trees chicken wofati bee woodworking
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Encourage a block-wide annual super-yard-sale to get reuse of stuff.
 
paul wheaton
steward
Posts: 28902
Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
hugelkultur trees chicken wofati bee woodworking
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Set up a local free-store, where reusable stuff can be set out for others.
 
pollinator
Posts: 1354
Location: RRV of da Nort
165
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
@Paul W: "I thought about phrasing this as carbon footprint or Eco footprint... but I think this can be far richer than that."

Network with those in your complex or block of complexes to get together face-to-face for the exchange of information on what works and what doesn't work in terms of leaving the apartment life for a landed one.  Engage in opportunities, when able and willing, to help pro bono on Permie-type growie/construction installations in your region which will be more of an education than you thought possible and in ways you never imagined.
 
pollinator
Posts: 145
Location: Courtrai Area, Flanders Region, Belgium Europe
26
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Attitude is half the battle. You don't have to be mad, but it helps - things as usual, got us in trouble - so you may as wel be an optimist and change yourself.



Apart from the above.... this may help with the rest of it.

Appartment living in a city is potentially a very ecological way of living. Permaculture is another but is of course focussed on land to use. Not everybody is suited for that life. Besides there is not enough land to permit everybody doing that. Trying to 'go back' to farming your own stuf may be our undoing. We need a high yield agriculture that will not damage the environment. Permaculture is one way to find that.


Buy local, buy in season, buy low tech, diversify your supply. Organise locally. Preserve local food when in season.


Do not complain about rubbish littering the streets - take it away when you walk the dogs. Be seen when you do it. Others will see you, might talk to you and follow your example. Organise and get media attention.
Try to live without waste.

To parafrase Lincoln - if you turn waste in to something usefull, have you not destroyed waste.


Experiment. Find out what works - better find out what does not. Share your experiences, get feed back.

Frugality is close kin to permies. Almost all permies-stuff is informed and creative frugality. Frugality pays. In my opinion it is the common sense, economic backbone of permaculture.

Reuse, read, refurbish, rethink, recreate - think out of the box - read, informed minds create better things, see more opportunities, see connections.....

Talk about your thoughts. Write about your toughts. It's a great help in organising your thinking. If you get better, publish.

We cannot do everything what needs doing. That's no reason to do nothing.
Grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference. If anything gets us, it will be lethargy.
 
Posts: 145
7
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

paul wheaton wrote:Wash and rinse your clothes with cold water. Most of the time your clothes will be just as clean and the energy cost is usually less than 1/10.



Better yet, use rain water to do laundry.  Tap water is highly processed / chlorinated .  . . rain water is all natural.

 
Erwin Decoene
pollinator
Posts: 145
Location: Courtrai Area, Flanders Region, Belgium Europe
26
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
A word of caution on the use of rain water.

I am very sure that the use of rain water is very dependant on the season, on your location and on the nature of your water harvesting system. Anybody downwind from a city or polluting industry or even a neighbour who burns plastics in his stove should be carefull.

I know for a fact - own research - that in some cases dioxine-like substances form by burning plastics and those substances do get in the soil and rainwater tanks of neighbours.

If you live isolated, no sweat but in the suburbs, near industry, downwind from major industries, beware.
 
Posts: 94
Location: Lancaster, UK
8
forest garden trees urban
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
learn to cook - from scratch - and invite people to share your meals
 
Posts: 2
Location: Bismarck, ND
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

paul wheaton wrote:Go poo-less.  No more soap or shampoo in the shower. It turns out that our body Funk is entirely water soluble.



I've seen a lot of references to this as I read through the site, and I'm just curious why it "make[s] the world a better place" as opposed to using natural or organic soaps, or oatmeal scrubs, etc.

I understand doing it to save money but unless its highly processed soap with a lot of artificial additives, I haven't connected the dots between the simple act of "using soap" and negative things.  Is it just due to the processing infrastructure associated with creating and distributing soap products, even if they are low impact?
 
paul wheaton
steward
Posts: 28902
Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
hugelkultur trees chicken wofati bee woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Jason Bohrer wrote:

paul wheaton wrote:Go poo-less.  No more soap or shampoo in the shower. It turns out that our body Funk is entirely water soluble.



I've seen a lot of references to this as I read through the site, and I'm just curious why it "make[s] the world a better place" as opposed to using natural or organic soaps, or oatmeal scrubs, etc.

I understand doing it to save money but unless its highly processed soap with a lot of artificial additives, I haven't connected the dots between the simple act of "using soap" and negative things.  Is it just due to the processing infrastructure associated with creating and distributing soap products, even if they are low impact?



- overall better health
- stop smearing toxic gick on your body every day
- use much less water, especially hot water
- smell better
- improved sense of smell
- save money
- save time

Your "organic" soap is probably made with some serious chemicals.  Probably lye.


 
Tracy Wandling
steward
Posts: 2149
Location: Sunshine Coast, BC
618
hugelkultur forest garden fungi trees books chicken bee
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
And shampoos, conditioners, etc - organic or otherwise - all come in plastic containers. I'd love to get away from buying things in plastic containers.
 
Jason Bohrer
Posts: 2
Location: Bismarck, ND
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks!  Now at least I see where you guys are coming from.
 
Posts: 9
3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
You don't need land or much in the way of resources to Guerrilla Grow food bearing trees and shrubs. I made this video that shows you how I do it: https://permies.com/t/66077/Guerrilla-Growing-Food-Bearing-Trees#561373
 
pollinator
Posts: 54
Location: Zone 4, SD
11
goat cat dog chicken wood heat homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Ask your landlord/apt. manager if there is any land he/she would let you use for a small garden.   Remember when my grandmother was kind of forced into an apartment situation and took over the small strip of space between the parking lot and the back of the buildings to grow her garlic and carrots etc.
 
steward
Posts: 6039
Location: Missoula, MT
1328
hugelkultur purity forest garden books food preservation
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Reduce food waste:
  • try to use up all the food you buy before it goes bad
  • take leftovers for lunch at work (in re-usuable containers, of course!)
  • freeze, dry, or can any food that you can't use up in time
  • freeze leftovers to make free and frugal soup
  • save veggie scraps to make veggie scrap broth
  • buy less food by either growing more (and harvesting only as needed) or through meal planning

  •  
    Jocelyn Campbell
    steward
    Posts: 6039
    Location: Missoula, MT
    1328
    hugelkultur purity forest garden books food preservation
    • Likes 2
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Re-invent leftovers for the bored or picky palate - turn tomato soup into a curry, or add leftover marinara sauce to chili, make a casserole or pot pie with leftover meat or veg, add leftover cooked veg to a scramble or frittata, etc.
     
    pollinator
    Posts: 321
    Location: New Zealand
    14
    • Likes 2
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Give up on make up.

    Use simple cleaning products like baking soda and white vinegar.

    Make your own soap.

    Buy bulk organic supplies and share with neighbours
     
    • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
    • New Topic
    Boost this thread!