• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Anne Miller
  • Mike Haasl
  • Pearl Sutton
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • r ranson
  • Burra Maluca
  • Joseph Lofthouse
master gardeners:
  • jordan barton
  • Leigh Tate
  • Carla Burke
gardeners:
  • Greg Martin
  • Jay Angler
  • John F Dean

Ending portable gas can/tank frustrations

 
steward
Posts: 4332
Location: West Tennessee
1844
cattle cat purity fungi trees books chicken food preservation cooking building homestead
  • Likes 8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I imagine many of us here on Permies are old enough to remember the old style 5 gallon or any size portable gas tanks that worked. At some point in the not too distant past, regulations changed and manufacturers of new portable tanks came up with clever, but not very functional in my opinion, ways to meet new regulations in place. I'm referring to the kind that have a push button on the pour spout, or the kind as shown in the first picture, that has this clumsy contraption of a filling neck where the little red buttony tab gets pushed, the entire tank is lifted upside down and placed as such in a filler opening that a small tab on the filling neck rests on the edge of the lawn mower fuel tank for example, thus depressing the telescopic neck allowing fuel to flow. I imagine that may be confusing for one to imagine if someone has never used one of these poorly designed portable gas tanks.

My brother surprised me the other day with pieces to convert a portable gas tank and make it like the old kind, with an unobstructed neck and a vent for the opposite side of the gas tank. I had no idea these things were out there. With a 1/2" drill bit, I put a hole near the top of the tank for the little yellow vent, and simply removed the original neck and screwed on the new one. Easy peasy, and now I have portable fuel tanks that no longer cause frustration.

IMG_20210422_094755569.jpg
Portable fuel tank with original crappy filling neck
Portable fuel tank with original crappy filling neck
IMG_20210422_095113676.jpg
Portable fuel tank with new vent installed and new filling neck
Portable fuel tank with new vent installed and new filling neck
 
Posts: 54
Location: southern oregon
11
foraging woodworking homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Nice! Where do I go to find these parts?
 
James Freyr
steward
Posts: 4332
Location: West Tennessee
1844
cattle cat purity fungi trees books chicken food preservation cooking building homestead
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hey Randal, here's one link of many I found: https://www.amazon.com/Replacement-Improved-Flexible-Compatible-Rubbermaid/dp/B08T8FTWMV/ref=sr_1_12?dchild=1&keywords=gas+tank+pour+spout&qid=1619188191&s=automotive&sr=1-12-catcorr

It took a minute to find them as I was using the wrong words in the search field, such as filling neck. I found using the words gas tank pour spout yielded what I was looking for. I was even in tractor supply yesterday and noticed them on the shelf there as well.
 
randal cranor
Posts: 54
Location: southern oregon
11
foraging woodworking homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks James. I try to buy local first, but not a lotta choices here, without driving.
 
Posts: 83
Location: S. New England
25
fungi foraging trees chicken bee wood heat homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks James! ...I logged in just to upvote. Will be getting some of these soon.

FWIW -in my experience, the "environmenatlly-friendly" contraption does far more harm than good, as I simply remove the nozzle altoghther out of frustration when refueling and often spill/overfill.
I'd been wonderng if some entreprising individual had yet created such a conversion, glad someone beat me to the punch and saved me the R&D expense.
 
master steward
Posts: 10740
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
3101
3
hunting trees books food preservation solar woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
At my local big box store (Menards) they sell the bendable nozzles that screw right on in the place of the new fangled shitty nozzles.
 
master gardener
Posts: 1039
Location: Coastal Salish Sea area, British Columbia - USDA zone 8-9
470
goat books chicken food preservation pig solar wood heat rocket stoves homestead ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My friend has the old style nozzles which are hard? they are one solid piece with a filter at the beginning. The new style which seems to be the only available nozzle is the telescoping nozzle. The telescoping nozzle in my opinion is crappy and begins to leak from the joints.

The other option i have is i use a shake suction hose to fill tanks up. I use it all the time and prefer it actually. I do not need to hold this heavy 5 gallon jug up in the air while trying to get the nozzle into the gas tank.
gift
 
Rocket Mass Heater Manual
will be released to subscribers in: soon!
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic