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Exists? Indoor clothes drying rack that won't fall apart

 
steward
Posts: 1191
Location: Torrey, UT; 6,840'/2085m; 7.5" precip; 125 frost-free days
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I'm thinking about getting a pulley-mounted rack even though the only place for it is suboptimal. Something like this. I'd rather have a folding rack by the wood stove, but...I've had two crappy folding racks in the past, don't want to waste any more funds on junk. Does anyone have a non-flimsy floor rack to recommend through actual use? Something the cat won't knock over? Won't sag under a load of jeans and towels? I'd rather spend an extra buck now and not have to replace it in a year or two.

 
steward
Posts: 7926
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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I have seen the hanging ones like you linked to. The ones I have seen are nice. Popular in parts of Europe.

I tend to agree with you on the folding ones. They are either flimsy ("One more cobweb and she's history!") or they take two people to set up and move, plus gobble up a lot of space even when not in use. I have yet to see one of the folding ones that looks like it would outlast a good pair of jeans.

 
Posts: 1947
Location: Southern New England, seaside, avg yearly rainfall 41.91 in, zone 6b
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I got a great one at a yard sale. It's very sturdy. It does take up a little space. I can't hang a big load on it but I use it all the time and it's in great shape.

My nasal passages and the house plants like the moisture in this dry indoor air!
 
pollinator
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Location: Anjou ,France
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How about this idea?
http://www.pulleymaid.com/beedboard_rack.htm
I would forget buying one just get someone to make you one . It does not look that difficult.

David
 
Matu Collins
Posts: 1947
Location: Southern New England, seaside, avg yearly rainfall 41.91 in, zone 6b
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My husband gave me "Permaculture: a Design Manual" for xmas this year, maybe he could top that if he handcrafted a wall-mounted drying rack like that...
 
Ann Torrence
steward
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Location: Torrey, UT; 6,840'/2085m; 7.5" precip; 125 frost-free days
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I remember Erica at NWEdible repurposed a baby play pen to make something like that wall mounted rack. Sadly, no wall space in the laundry area or I'd have already been thrifting.

It's sunny, 45F and 20 mph winds here, so I actually have the sheets out on the line. But cloudy tomorrow. And damp. But probably no snow We need the precip.

 
David Livingston
pollinator
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Pullymaid who I linked to above also have a zigzag dryer , We used to have one years ago http://www.pulleymaid.com/zigzag_clothes_airer.htm . It would not be too difficult to make . Its just 4 or five identical frames attached using simple hinges . On our very old one these hinges where just strips of hessian attached with what looked like big drawing pins
David
 
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http://www.homesteaddryingracks.com/

We have the big one. It is HUGE, like Amish family HUGE. It is STOUT, the dowels are full 3/4 inch. I have caught children CLIMBING on it.
 
David Livingston
pollinator
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I must admit it is an impressive rack

David
 
Ann Torrence
steward
Posts: 1191
Location: Torrey, UT; 6,840'/2085m; 7.5" precip; 125 frost-free days
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R Scott wrote:http://www.homesteaddryingracks.com/

We have the big one. It is HUGE, like Amish family HUGE. It is STOUT, the dowels are full 3/4 inch. I have caught children CLIMBING on it.


Awesome. Just the kind of thing I was hoping someone had a line on. Thanks!!
 
Posts: 100
Location: Chimacum, WA Sunset Zone 5, USDA Zone 8B
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My mother, who lives alone, has a rack very similar to this one www.pulleymaid.com/free_standing_airer.htm and it works quite well, even when loaded down with towels and jeans. It folds up out of the way easily, when needed, though she just leaves it out 99% of the time. It is sturdy when set up but she can easily move it around at her 69 years old.
 
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I ordered mine from here.

http://amishhomeplace.com/dryingracks.html
 
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Buy some coat hooks and mount them on wall studs across the room from each other. Make a small rope with loops on each end so that the rope is removable when done hanging clothes on them. Then use them as regular old coat hooks.
 
R Scott
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Location: Kansas Zone 6a
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Ikea also has a couple stainless ones that are staples of the tiny house movement. But they have a modern look that doesn't look right just everywhere.
 
Posts: 100
Location: Denver, Co 6000ft bentonite clay soil
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Depending on how much space you have I have one of these: http://www.amazon.com/Household-Essentials-Portable-Umbrella-Style-Clothes/dp/B001H1GUXW/ref=sr_1_2?s=storageorganization&ie=UTF8&qid=1419347332&sr=1-2&keywords=umbrella+clothes+drying+rack

It seems to be sturdy enough. If I use it outdoors I put some old pavers on the legs or it can blow over. I really only have two complaints. One is that it doesn't spin and the other is the plastic parts. I haven't seen any signs of wear yet but the plastic still bugs me.
 
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I would think Building one is very simple. I see the one out of wood dowels. I would think of Round Pipes. Seems like they would last forever. I use Hangers and they work great. 10 items on old wooden hangers. They dry overnight. Then I put the wooden hangers back away.

Or maybe you could go to IKEA and buy one. Oh No That's Right,, We are on PERMIES ...
Good Luck.
 
Matu Collins
Posts: 1947
Location: Southern New England, seaside, avg yearly rainfall 41.91 in, zone 6b
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My old drying rack fell apart.
 
Jeremiah wales
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I just finished Lunch with my neighbor. He is a 60 year old adult male with major brain damage. He lives on his own and is my closest neighbor. I keep an eye on him. To make sure he is ok. We were talking about this Thread about clothes rack.
He has a washing machine and no dryer.
His answer to this thread was WHaaaaaat??
He made his own clothes dryer. He put 4 eye hooks in the ceiling of one room. Strung a nice rope thru all 4 eye hooks. and that's it. He leaves them for one day and they are dry by end of day or the morning. His reply to all of you is. You should just do what I did. It works Great...

Folks this is an honest and serious answer from him. Consider it. Good Luck
 
Jeremiah wales
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Matu Collins wrote:My old drying rack fell apart.

were the kids climbing on it?
 
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Hmm.. What is your thoughts, is it great idea to find a compact dryer rack? I mean , it can be shape and compact in the unfolded state , and it should be quite roomy when the rack is open. Have ever met such racks? What is your thoughts about this question?
 
Posts: 94
Location: Lancaster, UK
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I made one out of two childrens cot sides..... dead easy, functional, strong, and folds up out of the way when not in use I made mine with just 2 sides, but you could just carry on and make it bigger, which would also make it more stable. The hinges are just cloth tapes tacked on
IMG_4446.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_4446.JPG]
 
Posts: 79
Location: Vermont
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I have one like this.  Got it on amazon when I used to shop there, but it is available at other online shops like ebay. Really easy to put up and down and store away.  I have dried a king sized sheet on it by draping across the gull wings.
gull-wing-stainless-steel-clothing-rack.jpg
[Thumbnail for gull-wing-stainless-steel-clothing-rack.jpg]
 
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