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Garden picture exchange!  RSS feed

 
pollinator
Posts: 450
Location: South West France
97
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Milo, do you mean the red plant ?

That's Elephant Head Amaranth which is an annual but self seeds here every year and our chickens love it.
 
Irene Kightley
pollinator
Posts: 450
Location: South West France
97
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Angelica in front of a young red hazel tree


Blackcurrants, Holly, Elder, Greengage behind the chicken shed


This little spot is the most vulnerable in our garden, just behind the chicken shed. I took the photo a few days ago and it shows (left to right) peach, blackcurrants, edible honeysuckle bushes, rasps, climbing beans, strawberries, Manchurian cherry, elder, mirabelle, peach tree. In the front there are a selection of flowers including comfrey, some rhubarb, and the little plants protected by sticks are courges, which (If they're not destroyed by the chickens) wil cover the ground and offer some shade around the other plants.


Mirabelle, with rhubarb, jerusalem artichokes and apple tree


Chinese quince grown from seed doing well in really heavy clay soil
 
Posts: 310
Location: Seattle, WA, USA
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Foreground: chard and carrots going to seed, comfrey, calendula, tomatos. Background: baby espalier, top bar hive, more stuff


Grape arbor, sage flowering, fox glove


Sage flowering, new huegelkultur with squash and yacon, raspberry trellis


Favas and Jerusalem artichokes, hops, grape, hardy kiwi


Fig, garlic, tomato starts in protective cylinders


Cosmos, bee balm, herbs, comfrey, blueberries
 
Irene Kightley
pollinator
Posts: 450
Location: South West France
97
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Now that is splendid indeed !
 
Posts: 408
Location: Georgia
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Great pictures are coming in. Thanks for sharing.
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My first Hugel bed...a traditional variety of lady's finger started fruiting

 
Posts: 275
Location: West Midlands UK (zone 8b) Rainfall 26"
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Camassias, globe artichoke, broad beans, rocket and land cress (going to seed, I love eating rocket flowers they taste like mustardy peanut butter), comfrey (mostly for making plant food, two plants allowed to flower for bees), flax (by request of my 16 year old son, heck, whatever gets them interested) !
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pollinator
Posts: 247
Location: Unincorporated Pierce County, WA Zone 7b
26
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Hello everyone,

I have been a lurker for quite some time and thought I would join with an offering. I inherited a plum tree (not shown) in poor shape two years ago and built a fruit tree guild around it. It is doing much, much better. Last spring, I planted two new, virtually identical plum trees, from the same nursery, on the same day. One I planted near a mulch bed/swale connected to a downspout, mulched regularly throughout the year, underplanted with lupine, comfrey, favas, daikon, nasturtiums, and a number of other things last summer. The other, I just ran out of time. It had to compete with grass, and I didn't realize HOW much difference having access to water was going to make. This spring, the difference between the two is stunning. The smaller tree doesn't look "bad"...the one in the fruit tree guild just looks so, so much better. It is several feet taller and wider...and the only real difference is what I did right off the bat..put it by a swale and built a guild around it. It was amazing to see the difference in action! I have since filled in the gaps under the larger tree with more plants and am going to turn my attention to getting the second tree caught up.


Plums></a>
 
Irene Kightley
pollinator
Posts: 450
Location: South West France
97
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Apios americana and honeysuckle with lizard






Mirabelle, elder, blackcurrans and poppies


Newest part of the garden with young trees














 
Posts: 23
Location: Portland, OR
1
bike forest garden woodworking
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Hi there, I've been gleaning lots of good information off these forums for a while now, but this is my first post. My wife and I bought a house with a nice-sized half acre yard here in Portland, Oregon three years ago and I've been fighting the lawn (and some blackberries) for garden space since then. This is really the first year where I feel like I've started to get ahead and get my garden established, so I thought I'd share a picture here.
When I started this area was all covered in sod, but with some advice from here and the help of my chickens, some layers of cardboard, good compost and a shovel I have been able to claim this area for my garden. There is still room for expansion, but I've got more plans for the area as well.
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Garden 2015
 
Posts: 13
Location: Zone 5b
5
homestead trees woodworking
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Compost power!
 
Posts: 9
Location: Minnesota
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A few of our growies!
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Jane Abbott
Posts: 9
Location: Minnesota
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More pics of the new old farm
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Posts: 3
Location: Seattle, WA
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This is my six week old hugelkultur mound, with two of my raised beds in the background.
The closest tree is a pear with 3 types grafted on, the middle a plum tree and the fat one is an almond that hasn't broke dormancy yet. Clover, strawberries, buckwheat and lots of flowers for ground cover, plus some squash and cucumber plants. This is just the first half to my whole design for hugelkulturs on this property, and it's all an experiment for me, but I think it's coming great so far!
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Posts: 10
Location: Tobago, Trinidad and Tobago
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San Antonio Farms and Stables, Garden, in Santa Cruz, Trinidad. A landscape photography assignment for the owners of San Antonio Farms and Stables. It is also part of Agro-tourism Photography Project.
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Posts: 35
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Southeast Texas. Small family run organic farm, its barely over my first year with this gig but its looking up.


https://www.dropbox.com/s/5udz1y0qe9q8eyz/IMG_20150512_112949_384.jpg?dl=0
^^ my German shepherd, little snowflake who hates being outside in the heat unless he has someplace cool/wet to sleep.

Direct link to my drop box farm folder because individual images are bandwidth heavy.

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/fz6hs1px9dz3wq3/AAASkW7-Fpch6HnP8e9ZsH7aa?dl=0
 
Posts: 27
Location: Aiuruoca, Brazil, 1250m
8
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Aiuruoca, Brazil

direct seeded chia field with Citrus and Bananas



Avocado Tree from the seed 7 years old, bananas , Vines and Roma,, food forest??



our thermal mass big buddy faced to the sun

 
Posts: 7
Location: Olney, Maryland
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Really enjoy looking at everyone's gardens, I always learn from copying other's ideas. Here is just a quick photo I took this past Sunday as I finished putting up some tall support cages for tomatoes. Last week I put down some newspaper, a three inch layer of decomposing shredded leaves and some mini pine bark nuggets to give it some texture for walking. This is in the paths around the few raised beds I have made from very old deck boards. In the beds after some mix of soil, vermiculite and compost I have a thin layer of chopped up straw and have been using some available biomass for chop and drop of Canada Thistle, Lambs Quarter, mint and wild raspberry that is invasive in my area. Because of our several past year deep freezes (below 0F) I have had an abundance of dead canes from Hydrangea and chop and drop the pieces mostly on the areas around the beds. Have limited Comfrey and will fix this in the future. Having fun in retirement. You may notice in the foreground bed there are some bundled bushy looking plants. These were from overwintering arugula seeds that was two big three foot tall bushes that came up early Spring as volunteers. I have tied them together and there are hundreds of seed pods that are almost dry enough to harvest into a bag while hoping she distribute again for overwinter and then Spring appearance. I have included a photo of the last pick of the arugula after a week of mid 90s temps from these volunteers and it was getting a little sparse, but these two clumps produced well for 3 months.

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Work In Progress
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Last Arugula June 22, 15
 
Posts: 74
Location: Prattville, Alabama, zone 8, 328ft
4
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nice
 
Posts: 17
Location: Somerville, MA
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Thanks for posting pictures everyone; I love seeing different people's ideas. Here is about half of my back garden, from a week and a half ago. From left to right:

Back Terrace
- apples, being espaliered trained to cable trellis (Wickson, Opalescent, Ashmead's Kernel, Tydeman's Late Orange)
- annual leeks, one perennial leek, horseradish, chamomille, perennial sorrel, rue, garlic chives, chives
- scarlet runner beans going up one pole, Sweet Meat Oregon Homestead squash going up the right hand pole

Mid Terrace
- Music garlic, King richard leeks, various carrots, lavendar, red fife spring wheat
- Seedling tomatoes, to go up strings on arched wood trellis
- Seedling asparagus (crowns mostly died from last year, drat)
- Junebearing strawberries, planted last year (AWESOME!)
- Borage, lovage, good king henry, lemon cucumber
- Baby hazenuts in cage for squirrel protection

Ground Level
- Hopi black dye sunflower plus various pole beans
- Assorted bush beans
- German butterball potatoes
- Penn. Dutch Butter popcorn, plus various pole beans

Against right hand fence
- Anna kiwi, to go up cable stay to back fence
- male kiwi, not sure where I'm going to send it, but maybe keep it pruned short on a pole
- three types mint (in pot)
- Nanking cherry
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Irene Kightley
pollinator
Posts: 450
Location: South West France
97
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The pumpkins are growing OK just behind the chicken shed



This is a view of our house (Which we haven't finished building yet.) and the gardens around it in Zone one and part of Zone two

 
Posts: 144
Location: Sacramento, CA
8
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This is my girlfriends house and her backyard was pretty much a barren dog run with half dirt/weeds and the other a sunbaked concrete slab. Long story but she didn't want to grow stuff on the dirt side so I got "permission" to garden the concrete section. I built these beds from fenceboards and painted them black per her preference. The beds were filled with some really nice compost we made from leaf litter and some soil from her yard, the one on the left has about a 1.5 feet but the one on the right is barely over a foot of soil. The real point is these are simple cheap beds put on concrete and planted in July which is WAY late in Sacramento and yet we have watermelon, thriving beens, both bush and pole, on the left are Thai basil and purple, there are green onions you can't see as well as chard and arrugula. The screens are made from 4' wide wire fencing and the overall effect is really nice. One the next set of beds is in, they will have a short 2' screen on them to keep her four legged chicken out of the beds. Her dog was a rescue dog from Taiwan (I know...WTF?) but it eats EVERYTHING, watermellon, tomatoes, even the peppers! So this patio is going to have a little gate and then we are going to backfill the concrete with decomposed granite and the effect should almost be worthy of Sunset magazine.

Anyway, here are a couple of pics....


This her dog eating watermelon

 
Posts: 71
Location: Italy
forest garden trees
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Very good photos...open space, nature and plants
 
Francesco Delvillani
Posts: 71
Location: Italy
forest garden trees
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Gabriel Guhr wrote:Aiuruoca, Brazil

direct seeded chia field with Citrus and Bananas



Avocado Tree from the seed 7 years old, bananas , Vines and Roma,, food forest??



our thermal mass big buddy faced to the sun




Fantastic....Is Avocado already ready to flower? It's awesome
Do you grow other tropical fruit trees?
 
pollinator
Posts: 2236
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
130
forest garden trees urban
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Tillage radish, self sown...
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Radish!
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Also,Radish!
 
steward
Posts: 3037
Location: Moved from south central WI to Portland, OR
545
bee bike chicken food preservation hugelkultur urban
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Wow, that's quite a radish!

Impressive.
 
William Bronson
pollinator
Posts: 2236
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
130
forest garden trees urban
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Thanks! It's crazy hot, tried roasting them, still to hot, this one is in a vinegar/salt/sugar brine with apple slices.
 
Julia Winter
steward
Posts: 3037
Location: Moved from south central WI to Portland, OR
545
bee bike chicken food preservation hugelkultur urban
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You might want to try fermentation, so a brine with just salt and let the lactobacilli make the "vinegar." It seems to take the heat out of radishes.
 
William Bronson
pollinator
Posts: 2236
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
130
forest garden trees urban
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Julia, I will be doing that next, I have more of these out in the yard and a lacto ferment is my ideal.
 
Francesco Delvillani
Posts: 71
Location: Italy
forest garden trees
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Very very nice photos congrat
 
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My first 2 hugelkultur beds, they are in fact sunken as we are in a coastal area that gets quite dry in the summer.
In the first I just have lupin getting the soil ready, I was more daring in the second one and planted some brassicas.

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Hugelkultur1
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Hugelkultur2
 
Posts: 25
Location: Ontario Canada
dog food preservation cooking
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Transforming the front lawn.

Grubs killed this whole area of lawn. Decided to grow perennials and flowers, since part of it is septic bed.

Eventually the remaining grass will become white clover.
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Posts: 3
Location: Dallas, TX
chicken hugelkultur urban
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We're a micro farm in the Dallas Tx suburbs. We were really inspired by the Grow Food, Not Lawns movement and have been eliminating the grass and focusing on perennial edible medicinal and pollinator friendly plants! We started with one 10x10' raised bed (We have hardpan clay soil), at first we were busting sod, then I found permaculture and we began using the lasagna method of heavy cardboard, newspaper, soil & mulch. Actually, the first bed was an accidental hugal bed! I had a bunch of big wooden clipping from pruning trees, and unfinished compost, and dumped it on the bottom, then covered with soil. That bed was prolific!

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Okra in Texas
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Front Yard, Doesn't look like much, but there's 2 plum trees, Raspberries, Passionflower, Garlic, Flowers, Lemongrass, onions, cucumbers and more
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One Section of the backyard, rotates seasonally, tomatoes in this image
 
Posts: 1
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I have had so much fun flipping through your pictures I thought I would share one of our permaculture garden.
So far the construction is complete-ish we still need to construct climbing structures for climbing veggies.. we produced over 2000 tomatoes this year.
The goal is to make the entire property eatable. we are about 40% of the way there...
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This is our garden in the works.
 
Jackie Sawicky
Posts: 3
Location: Dallas, TX
chicken hugelkultur urban
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We've been working on eliminating all grass from our property (except for a small yard carved out for the dogs). In the chicken photo, you can see a last patch of grass that's currently being smothered by a giant cardboard box. It will become another raised bed next paycheck The front yard has 2 massive oak trees, and we planted an herb garden under it, but I need to transplant the full sun plants, they need more rays. We also love medicinal/smokable/teable/magical plants. And cut flowers for the farmers market. Our long-term goal is to buy 5 acres or so and become full-time farmers/homesteaders. This home in the 'burbs is practice!
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Laying down carboard. Same bed as that monster okra!
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Beds on the side of the house
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Our Backyard Flock
 
Irene Kightley
pollinator
Posts: 450
Location: South West France
97
chicken fiber arts food preservation forest garden fungi goat homestead rocket stoves sheep solar
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I love the Rudbeckia Donna !

I'm sitting up late tonight waiting for the conserves to finish bubbling away, so I thought I'd post a few pics just to say hello to everybody !

This is the back terrace of the house we've built. To the left is a cellar and it's covered in an open climber covered gloriette which we had to build to keep the cellar cooler in summer. The beds in front of (South facing) it are all raised hugel beds, also to keep the cellar as cool as possible.



This is the gloriette from the terrace, looking over the garden which is on a steep slope. We decided to build the cellar there to help stabilise the earth behind the house.



This part of a quick growing hedge I planted to protect the north of the new potager from searing west winds. It still does a great job doing that and the perfumes from the roses, honeysuckle, wisteria, jasmine etc are heavenly and it's always full of bees and birds' nests. I did intend to rip it out once I planted shrubs and they became established but I like it just the way it is.



This is me opening up and spreading sheeps' wool over an established hugelkultur bed to renovate it










 
pollinator
Posts: 10556
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
456
cat chicken fiber arts fish forest garden greening the desert trees wood heat
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Your place is so beautiful, Irene!
 
Posts: 79
Location: New England USA, Zone 7a
1
bee hugelkultur urban
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I am loving looking through this thread. Those of us in the northeast US just got a whole lot of snow dumped on us... these photos are such great reminders that seasons change. We won't be cooped up inside forever!
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